Burned DVD doesnt play smoothly

Before I start, here is what I use in burning
-ConvertXtoDVD
-Philips DVD+R

The 1st time I burned my movie into the philips DVD+R it was successful but when I checked it there was no data, so what I did was I burned the same movie again into the same Philips DVD+R and luckily the movie was burned successfully. I happily inserted my DVD into my DVD player and it played just fine but after a few seconds it started jumping from a second to another, now I wont understand my movie because of the many scenes that was not shown.

Is it still advisable to reuse the blank media in situations like this?

This can be related to burnning to fast, 8x is a good write speed for video backups.

You can only burn a DVD once, so your first attempt didn’t write anything. What burn speed are you using? Does the movie play from your hard drive without problems?

If the disk was actually burned the first time, the disk should have been closed, and therefore not capable of being burned again.

Try setting output from ConvertXtoDVD to the hard drive, then test the video by playing in the computer first. You might have to check it chapter to chapter to make sure the conversion itself is not screwed up. If the video plays ok on the computer, you will have more assurance that any problems that occur will be due to the burning process, or the quality of the disks you are using.

Once you have checked the dvd-video, burn it to a disk using ImgBurn. ImgBurn is a free burning program, and will not conflict with any other programs. You can find it here: www.imgburn.com Just install it, start the program and click on [I]Write files/folders to disc[/I].
You can drag and drop the folder containing your dvd-video into the main window. Make sure Output (at the top of the main window) is set to Device. Now here is the part that may be important with these Philips disks. Reduce burning speed to 8x. You can find this control on the right side of the main window of ImgBurn under Device.

If you are using a laptop burner, reduce the speed to 6x.

We generally recommend blank disks made by Verbatim with AZO on the label (not their “Life Series” disks) or ones made by Taiyo Yuden. The TY disks can be found online or under the JVC brand.

By the way, welcome to the forums blackbrigade.

Well I burned on my Toshiba laptop and the write speed was only 8x and I’ve read somewhere that use only half the max speed so I set it to 4x only. By the way I played it on my hard drive and it works fine for a few seconds until VLC (im using vlc because it can read most codecs) exits immediately.

I think the media is the problem here (At least I think it is). Well, I guess I wont reuse blank media that has been through burning processes whether successful or not.

Thanks for the replies… :slight_smile:

[QUOTE=blackbrigade;2586490]Before I start, here is what I use in burning
-ConvertXtoDVD
-Philips DVD+R

The 1st time I burned my movie into the philips DVD+R it was successful but when I checked it there was no data, so what I did was I burned the same movie again into the same Philips DVD+R and luckily the movie was burned successfully. I happily inserted my DVD into my DVD player and it played just fine but after a few seconds it started jumping from a second to another, now I wont understand my movie because of the many scenes that was not shown.

Is it still advisable to reuse the blank media in situations like this?[/QUOTE]

Some older DVD recorders and players do not “support” DVD+R media. I had a similar experience trying to play a finalized DVD+R in a circa 2003 Toshiba VHS/DVD combo player/recorder.

DVD “+” formats were first recognized as a valid DVD format by the DVD Forum, a consortium of manufacturers and others, on 25 January 2008.

DVDFab is the software to use now, and Verbatim Media. Burn in Data form the VOB Files. If you are serious about good Back ups, get the paid version of DVDFab and use a solid Workstation with a fast Processor, and plenty of Memory. Laptops are not Workstations and I don’t recommend them for serious Video Editing. :cool:

With my stand-alone Panasonic, Magnavox, Philips, and other DVD recorders I prefer JVC/Taiyo Yuden 8x Premium Line DVD-R media for master recordings and archival recordings. Vertbatim DataLifePlus 8x DVD-R media is also suitable for such work.

For use with duplicators and computers I use 16x Verbatim AZO series or JVC/Taiyo Yuden 16x media for distribution of material with a normal lifespan expectation.

For short-interest duplicated material I sometimes use the throw-away China Magnetics Corporation (CMC) media, Verbatim Life Series, Magnavox, TDK, HP, Philips and/or other brands that are often found on sale for $12.99 per spindle of 100 DVDs. Even though that CMC media is the same as Memorex, I refuse to use media bearing the Memorex brand name. The other brands do not have such a bad reputation, e.g., TDK used to be among the best retail brands but not since TDK became part of Imation Corporation:

http://www.imation.com/en-us/

Pictured below are some examples, the throw-away grade China Magnetics Corporation Verbatim Life Series at the left, the good Mitsubishi Chemical Corporation Verbatim AZO series at the center and the outstanding JVC/Taiyo Yuden Premium Line media at the right.