Building a Hi-Def system: where do we start?

Let’s say that you have some cash and you want to build a Hi-def system, or upgrade your current system. What would you buy first given current availability and prices?

Also, let say that you have some of the system(s) already, what will be your next buy?


If I start from scratch, I would probably buy a flat panel HDTV first so I can watch digital cable channels. Then if cash allows, I would upgrade my PC to a Core2Duo or Quad Core and add HDCP video card and monitor. Next step would probably a blu-ray/hd-dvd drive for PC if the price is right. :wink:

How about you?

I [I]have[/I] an HD system, 50" Sony LCD RPTV (1080i). Do not discount a rear projection LCD or DLP, mine has a picture that rivals flat panel plasmas and LCD. In fact, it has a better picture than my Olevia 32" LCD HDTV (720p). They are very cost effective compared to similiar size flat panels. It is connected to a Yamaha 850w 7.1 (though I am only using 5.1 right now) with a Klipsch 12" sub, large Yamaha front speakers and Polk Audio side speakers. And an Oppo upconverting DVD player. I won’t buy an HD or Bluray because the units and DVDs are way overpriced. The upconverter is near HD and I can play all my burned DVDs (which [I]do[/I] upconvert by the way). Blank HD or Bluray media costs as much as an HD/BR movie, so save your money for now. Also, of course I have all the HD channels that Comcast offers (around 19 right now) so I’m pretty happy with that setup.
So that is what I would get, a nice 50" display, a good Home theater (even a economy $300 HT in a box is an improvement) and a good upconverting dvd play plus HD programming (cable, satellite whatever has the most HD channels in the area).

To build a High Definition system, I first need a progressive scan monitor. A 1080i monitor is NOT high definition. 1080p IS high definition. I am waiting for a 70" SED TV. Then you need a home theater receiver with HDMI connection. I use a Denon. Your DVD player must be progressive scan with HDMI connection. In order to incorporate all of the real HD broadcasts, an HDCP chip is required in all of the devices. My satellite box is a Pansat FTA with HDMI and HDCP. I use two front speakers, a center channel speaker, two side channel speakers, two rear channel speakers, and two powered sub woofers. The two front channel sub woofers and the two powered sub woofers are 12" Pyle Drivers. The mid range are Vifa(Denmark) and the tweeters and super tweeters are Optimus. All are mounted in walnut wood cabinets ceiling high. The side channels each have a mid range firing one to the front in phase and one to the back out of phase. The center channel speaker has one tweeter and two midrange drivers. The box is wall mounted below the TV set. The TV monitor is wall mounted ceiling high. Currently a 62" Plasma.

First is the screen. I already wanted to buy a plasma but I heard that Laser-TV will launch somewhen next year, so I think I can wait another few month :wink:

Have the screen and the system minus the burner so; first the burner then the player.

That is rediculous to say that 1080i is [I]not[/I] HD. I am not saying that 1080p isn’t better but 1080i is certainly HD and is a beautiful display. No broadcast is broadcast in 1080p and there are no plans anywhere or any time to do so because it takes up too much bandwidth. The only thing you can watch in 1080p is Bluray or Hd discs so it is kind of a waste for most people. Most people could not tell the difference between 1080i and 1080p unless the display is larger than 60" and who can fit that in their living room?

Most of the displays that I see in homes are over 60". I am getting a 70" display for my first one. I am waiting for the technology to get to an acceptable level. Progressive scanning eliminates all of the problems inherent with interlaced scanning.

[QUOTE=slytrans69;1930809]Most of the displays that I see in homes are over 60". I am getting a 70" display for my first one. I am waiting for the technology to get to an acceptable level. Progressive scanning eliminates all of the problems inherent with interlaced scanning.[/QUOTE]
Wow! You Long Beachers must be filthy rich. I’m not saying that a lucky few don’t have them, but here in poor Connecticut I have never seen a 60" HD Display in a home, only in a store.

[QUOTE=ricoman;1930838]Wow! You Long Beachers must be filthy rich. I’m not saying that a lucky few don’t have them, but here in poor Connecticut I have never seen a 60" HD Display in a home, only in a store.[/QUOTE]

If you’re watching 1080i/p from 10-12 ft, 70" is about right. the pictures are that good. Watching 480i/p from that distance might be pushing the limits a bit.

I have a 50" and sit about 8’-9’. Looks great (1080i). I’ve had it 2 yrs. and still say WOW! Just picked up that $98 Toshiba HD-A2 and am waiting on the Planet Earth HD package. Should be here any day. Can’t wait. Life is good.:cool:

[QUOTE=ricoman;1930944]I have a 50" and sit about 8’-9’. Looks great (1080i). I’ve had it 2 yrs. and still say WOW! Just picked up that $98 Toshiba HD-A2 and am waiting on the Planet Earth HD package. Should be here any day. Can’t wait. Life is good.:cool:[/QUOTE]
You are also going to start appreciating the upscaler in the Toshiba, it’s one of the best. DVD’s never looked so good.

In my case I have done the following

Purchased a 32" LCD TV when my old widescreen portable blew up.

Also upgraded my old AM2 4200 PC to a quad core Q6600, this means I have the CPU left over so purchased a 690G mobo (integrated hi-def acceleration capable graphics) and built it into an ultra slim case (1.8" high).

Then I ran out of HDD space on my 250GB drive, it was also noisey in a silent room. Replaced it with a 1TB Western Digital Green Power HDD, near silent (can still hear it seek but very little spindle whine), 4x the storage and runs cold so no need for a cooling fan for it.

The only drawback with the above is that the case only takes a slimline notebook drive so roll on the LG slimline HDDVD / BR drives and I will be in heaven (Shame none are on the drawing board)

A few weeks ago I answered “Flat Panel HDTV” as where to start. A week ago I got both a Toshiba 47" 1080p LCD and an HD-A30 HD-DVD player. Both are highly recommended for anyone starting out. The 47HL167 was $1500 from tigerdirect.com plus $177.50 for truck shipping. Which is pretty good compared to $2000 at Best Buy. If anyone gets an HD-DVD player, start out with the movie King Kong (2005).

Now that I’ve taken the red pill, I’m considering also taking the blue pill (err…I guess it’d be one giant purple pill then). Does anyone have any experience with the Panasonic DMP-BD30K? It seems like the logical choice, since (the few) reviews it has are positive and it’s the only one I’ve found that specifically says it plays both SL and DL BD-R. I don’t plan on buying a Blu-Ray burner any time soon, but this seems good for future proofing.

I voted for an HD PC as I already have a Samsung 47" Plasma, purchased a year ago. I’m with Ricoman, it’s [I]only [/I]1080i, but currently, and most probably until you need a new one, 1080p is only Blu-Ray/HD-DVD. I have re-screened a bunch of my DVDs and they are absolutely awesome in wide screen on this TV. i vs. p is like winesnobs, in a double-blind test most experts couldn’t tell you which one you’re lookin’ at. You don’t need a Blu-Ray and 1080p for King Kong to knock your eyes out. Look out for that Brontosaurus!

My kids are still being overwhelmed by all the new stuff they can see on their PS2 and N64 games.

On your way home with your new HDTV. Stop in at Target and buy a ~$20 RCA amplified, old-fashioned rabbit ear antenna. Don’t let anyone fool you into some really expensive “special” HD antenna, it uses the same one as your grandfather’s Admiral did. In most large cities in the US, CBS, ABC, NBC, FOX, WB and your local PBS are broadcasting in HD. Sporting events broadcast in 1080i are spectacular.

If you have Verizon in your home town or city check to find out if Verizon Fiber Optic has come to your neighbor if yes apply for Verizon “Fios” 3 play (TV with more than 300 digital and HD TV+Phone +High Speed Internet ) all for $99 month.

The Verizon Fios is the best and latest technology to start building HD TV & Entertainment system if you have Plasma, LCD or even DLP TV.

[QUOTE=TCAS;1933210]If you have Verizon in your home town or city check to find out if Verizon Fiber Optic has come to your neighbor if yes apply for Verizon “Fios” 3 play (TV with more than 300 digital and HD TV+Phone +High Speed Internet ) all for $99 month.

The Verizon Fios is the best and latest technology to start building HD TV & Entertainment system if you have Plasma, LCD or even DLP TV.[/QUOTE]

Yeah, my brother in Armonk, NY has the Fios 3 and loves it. Unfortunately they don’t have it here in my area of CT. I have Comcast with 19 HD channels but it costs a fortune and the lower “digital” (my ass) channels look pretty poor. The DishNet has a lot of HD but doesn’t have YESHD and I got to watch my Yankees in HD now that I’m use to it. Spoiled I guess. :wink:

Posted byRicoman
Unfortunately they don’t have it here in my area of CT

    I know they have in Darien Ct. My sister lives there. Hopefully it will come to you soon.:iagree:

i was wondering if a samsung 46’ 1080p T4665F was worth buying. any pros & cons? before i spend my money

[QUOTE=blackram;1937822]i was wondering if a samsung 46’ 1080p T4665F was worth buying. any pros & cons? before i spend my money[/QUOTE]

Making a purchase on a new t.v. can be quite difficult and sometimes overwhelming for an individual, here are some links for you to look at, you might be able to find some other individuals opinions on your particular t.v.


http://www.hdtvoice.com/voice/index.php

You could also try googling for reviews on your t.v and read them objectively.

Looking at what features that standout on a t.v. , to me there are some important features that I would look for apart from the obvious.

[B]Resolution:[/B] What does it support (1920 x 1080)

[B]Contrast Ratio:[/B] The most important part is the Native Contrast Ratio, not the Dynamic Contrast Ratio.

[B]Frame Rate Conversion:[/B] 120 Hz will become the new standard
[B]
Response Time:[/B] The lower the number the better. ( IE 4ms )

[B]View modes:[/B]

Different manufactures will have different viewing modes when the signal is feed to the T.V and will have different names. The more modes offered is a nice feature and to be able to manipulate the input will make one a happier person.

IE:

[B]Stretch[/B]

Suitable for viewing wide-screen 1.78:1 aspect ratio program, stretch mode will show very thin black bands at the top and bottom screen.

[B]Dot by Dot ( 1080i/p only)[/B]

Detects the resolution of the signal and displays an image with the same number of pixels on the screen.

[B]Full screen ( 720p only ) [/B]

Select when receiving a 720p signal.

[B]Zoom[/B]

Suitable for viewing wide-screen 2.35:1 aspect-ratio programs in full screen.

:cool::cool:

[QUOTE=platinumsword;1937896]Making a purchase on a new t.v. can be quite difficult and sometimes overwhelming for an individual, here are some links for you to look at, you might be able to find some other individuals opinions on your particular t.v.


http://www.hdtvoice.com/voice/index.php

You could also try googling for reviews on your t.v and read them objectively.

Looking at what features that standout on a t.v. , to me there are some important features that I would look for apart from the obvious.

[B]Resolution:[/B] What does it support (1920 x 1080)

[B]Contrast Ratio:[/B] The most important part is the Native Contrast Ratio, not the Dynamic Contrast Ratio.

[B]Frame Rate Conversion:[/B] 120 Hz will become the new standard
[B]
Response Time:[/B] The lower the number the better. ( IE 4ms )

[B]View modes:[/B]

Different manufactures will have different viewing modes when the signal is feed to the T.V and will have different names. The more modes offered is a nice feature and to be able to manipulate the input will make one a happier person.

IE:

[B]Stretch[/B]

Suitable for viewing wide-screen 1.78:1 aspect ratio program, stretch mode will show very thin black bands at the top and bottom screen.

[B]Dot by Dot ( 1080i/p only)[/B]

Detects the resolution of the signal and displays an image with the same number of pixels on the screen.

[B]Full screen ( 720p only ) [/B]

Select when receiving a 720p signal.

[B]Zoom[/B]

Suitable for viewing wide-screen 2.35:1 aspect-ratio programs in full screen.

:cool::cool:[/QUOTE]

thanks 4 the advice. i did check out the avsfourms & that was a great help. i think i will go with the samsung 46’ lcd