British music industry disputes law that makes CD and DVD copying legal

vbimport

#1

We’ve just posted the following news: British music industry disputes law that makes CD and DVD copying legal[newsimage]http://static.myce.com//images_posts/2009/12/pirate-flag.jpg[/newsimage]
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Read the full article here: http://www.myce.com/news/british-music-industry-disputes-law-that-makes-cd-and-dvd-copying-legal-73593

            Please note that the reactions from the complete site will be synched below.

#2

For music, I believe there is a solution to piracy for the digital age:

[ol]
[li]The artists freely distribute their new music for publicity to build their fanbase.
[/li][li]They earn money when fans pay to watch them perform live on stage.
[/li][/ol]
Simple, but obviously not in favour of the music industry… :cool:


#3

“[I]he British music industry doesn’t accept the decision of the government which gives consumers the right to make copies of legally purchased music CDs and DVDs. The industry believes it should receive a fair compensation for making copies.[/I]”

That is and has always been absurd. First of when any consumer buys any tool for data storage (CD, DVD etc.) the price already contains a certain percentage which is for “future intellectual property content”. Those are the little stickers on the boxes.
Secondly if I already bought let us say a music CD, the CD is my property whilst the content is not, but the content is on my property. SIC! How do they want to separate one from the other. Anyway I have bought it and I am free to do anything with it except copying and distributing it for profit. BUT: I can freely copy it for my kids, for my wife and myself to listen in the car or have another copy in my different houses etc. That is my right as I have bought it for my and my families purposes.
Another question which seems to be off-topic, but is not. I subscribe for all HBO channels. I know I won’t be at home at a certain time when a certain movie will be broadcasted. I record it in my home where I have the subscription. I made a copy. Shall I pay extra money again? Hell not. I have the right to watch it when I want. I have payed for it.

All these actions do nothing but limit the natural rights of people who legally own intellectual property. This and the strive for extra profit that result in unreal prices give birth to piracy.

P.S.: And what about the books? Also intellectual property. Can I lend it, can I distribute it among my friends if I want? Again, shall I pay extra money for that as well? Or can’t I just read it in my circle of friends loudly every saturday evening? Or this is already an illegal distribution of the content?


#4

That’s right… people start doing the same thing they’ve been doing for years, and it can be considered “damage”, despite the fact that many people buy the music for just this purpose. The sky is falling. Civilization as we know it is coming to an end. If you need me, I’ll be in my bunker.

PS: the entire above paragraph was 100% sarcasm. These industry giants are hurting themselves and blaming the world, much like an angry self-destructive alcoholic.


#5

This is somewhat typical of the music industry though.

They’ll spend more money trying to restrict and annoy their existing paying customers than they will trying to encourage new ones. :rolleyes:

[B]Wombler[/B]


#6

I remember as a kid using a small “cheap” reel to reel to record radio played songs . All AM stations back then at least here in Amarillo Texas.
There were no 8-tracks , cassettes , much less CDs.
We did have vinyl to play on turntables.
I eventually had a cheap kid level on of those.
My parents didn’t let us use their turntable without close supervision.

I don’t remember hearing one word about piracy .
So shouldn’t I be grandfathered in since I started before anyone was claiming piracy ?


#7

Yeah back in 69-70 when in the army a buddy bought a nice Sony reel to reel and I bought a Sony cassette player and turn table duty free down in Panama .They had Electronic store and you could buy cheap and you could ship it home when you got reassigned back to the states.Well my buddy would go all over the battalion and get new 33s albums from other soldiers and we would record on his reel to reel and my cassettes . I forgot how much music on those reel to reels but we had guy coming all over the place wanting to barrow some music and trade us something they had.Here 45 years later it’s still goes on,when people hear something they like they have to have it,music to be listened to.
I’m just Screemin’ and Cryi’n the blues.


#8

I never bought a nice reel to reel.
I went strait to 8-track & then cassette.
I remember a friend with a nice one . I think it may have been a Sony .
I remember the reels on his holding 7 hours of music .
The amount depended on record speed.
Like VHS & even DVDs less time but faster speed equaled better quality.
He was into the tech stuff .
He had a quad amp & a remote(wired) joystick to control it.
Music to the amp was from the r to r.

BTW I still have a working 8-track player/recorder .
I have very few 8-track tapes left to play on it.
Not looking for “new” ones. & I don’t have any blanks left either.


#9

All these actions do nothing but limit the natural rights of people who legally own intellectual property. This and the strive for extra profit that result in unreal prices give birth to piracy.

:iagree::clap:
Totally agree!..While the world is fast changing due to all new technology,those moguls are attached to an old business model and close their eyes for new ways about how multimedia is used…
I understand that intellectual property has to be protected,but that became their main focus,instead of just a part of the job…

Flashback from the eighties that still baffles me :
Production cost of cd’s was much lower than vinyl,but cd costed almost twice because of it carried the ‘digital audio’ stamp…so who are the real thieves then??..:bigsmile:


#10

My first stereo I bought myself was a POS because I HAD to have a Reel to Reel to go with it. I think it was about 1977 and I bought a Akai 4000ds, the cheapest one they made, it didn’t even have the GX glass heads that would never wear out.
I had probably 50 tapes made from the radio and albums by the time I finally traded it off in the early 90’s and it had a groove worn in the heads from me using it pretty much daily. I also got Cassette decks so we could play stuff in our cars and my last one was a nice Denon that had 3 heads, bias adjust, and dolby c, sounded great, still have it but it’s on loan to my step dad.
I have since picked up a couple of the better 3 head GX Akai decks for a family tape project I did many years ago when step dad found a big box full of ancient reel to reel tapes made by his dad, family members and himself. Oldest one was from 1947 made on a original Ampex by his brother who was a DJ in the Army back then.
People always taped stuff, the radio stations mostly stopped playing whole albums because we would record them, and some wouldn’t even tell you how long it was so you couldn’t make sure to have enough tape loaded up.
I now also have a nice Panasonic DAT deck and a old mono tube RtoR deck I got to play some of those really old single track mono tapes step dad had, the DAT I got because it is early digital on 4mm tapes and is just really cool tech.
Now I do digital only pretty much but despise the loudness wars that have completely destroyed the quality of sound a CD COULD produce if they actually cared.
They are dinosaurs just like me, but they have never learned to move on and adapt like I have.
The first CD’s I ever heard were just awe inspiring on how quiet and dynamic the music was, not like they are now where it’s so compressed many ways that the levels hit 0 and never back off till the album ends, louder is better right:rolleyes:
We wont stop finding ways around anything they come up with, if they priced stuff more reasonably and made it OK to copy for personal use they’d probably sell a lot more then they do now, and maybe let artist actually make the music they’d like rather then the latest flavor of the day 100 times over.


#11

We wont stop finding ways around anything they come up with, if they priced stuff more reasonably and made it OK to copy for personal use they’d probably sell a lot more then they do now, and maybe let artist actually make the music they’d like rather then the latest flavor of the day 100 times over.

:clap::clap::clap:
Well said!! :iagree:


#12

The stupid thing is we are not allowed to break DRM to make these copies. Therefore their complaint is a waste of time as they DRM everything they can these days.