Boot to MAC OSx from a USB Flash Drive

vbimport

#1

Any ideas how to do it…?
thanks.


#2

Your question isn’t really clear, but this is the basic explanation:


#3

[QUOTE=negritude;2726578]Your question isn’t really clear, but this is the basic explanation:

http://support.apple.com/kb/ht1948[/QUOTE]

The problem is that one of the criterias they have is that “the external USB storage device contains an installation of Mac OS X… which is compatible with (or shipped with) the Mac that the USB device is connected to”.

I want a generic MAC OSx, that I will be able to boot any computer with.
“Hiren’s Boot CD”, for example, has a generic Win7, WinXP and Win98 (and also Unix and more) that one can put on his USB drive, and boot with it any computer.
A similar idea has “UNetbootin” - on all kinds of operating systems.
I’m searching for the same thing, just with MAC OSx operating system.
Any ideas?


#4

Your Problems criteria is very simple i think you don’t have basic concept. best book for you it you become expert in this field buy dummies and read all the concept and share your point into forum criteria.


#5

[QUOTE=azeemkhan;2726593]Your Problems criteria is very simple i think you don’t have basic concept. best book for you it you become expert in this field buy dummies and read all the concept and share your point into forum criteria.[/QUOTE]

I’m an electronics & comp. engineer. I asume I know better than the avarage person… maybe even you…
I thought about it a bit more. If I understand correctly, the thing is that the UFD is manufactured electronicaly (eg Hardware) with an ID recognition code of a CD drive. This is why when it is connected to the computer, it recognize it as such (checked also on Mac OS).
So the only way is to baypass the protection using specific software.
Again. I will be happy to get ideas how to do it.


#6

Any installation of OS X should support booting on any Mac hardware supported by that version of OS X. To support the latest hardware, you will have to have the latest version of OS X (otherwise the kernel extensions will not exist), with the understanding that the latest version will [understandably] not support earlier hardware. And note that sometimes the latest version of OS X deployed via retail channels is not the absolute latest version, nor is it guaranteed to support the latest hardware (though that’s usually less of a problem now with the downloadable OS installations; it was more of a problem when you had to have the CD or DVD).

I’ve never seen anyone manage to successfully bundle .kext files for older Mac hardware with drastically newer versions of OS X (maybe 10.4 drivers on a 10.5 installation, or 10.7/10.8 drivers on a 10.9 OS installation, but that’s about it). Apple has some pretty strictly-defined cutoffs regarding what the can and will tolerate in this regard.

EDIT: I’d have a bootable copy of the installation disc (or installation image) on a USB drive just as soon as I had a full installation on a USB drive.


#7


#8

How do I ‘make’ such a USB Flash Drive?
(By the way, the previous post was put here by mistake. It should have been posted in a different forum)