Blue-Ray Disc Drives and Restrictions/DRM

vbimport

#1

I have been flashing DVD drives region free (RPC-I) and RPC-2-Auto Reset (when RPC1 not available) for a long time.

I have recently been looking into Blue-Ray Disc drives and was wondering about whether the drives enforce region codings.

Also, I have noticing that many of the Blue-Ray Disc drives support reading or writing DVD type media.

Do Blue-Ray disc drives that support DVD type media also enforce DVD region codings?

Do Blue-Ray disc drives that support support any other region codings?

Are there other restrictions / DRM in the Blue-Ray Disc drives/firmware that one should know about?


#2

The region coding has not really changed with BD-R drives that I am aware. At this point, MediaCodeSpeedEdit does have a RPC-2-auto reset patch ability for some LG BD-R drives.

Programs like AnyDVD HD have been updated to handle all the new protections they’ve dreamed up for Blu-ray, as well as removing the region code restrictions and HDCP limitations.


#3

Thanks for the response deanwitty.

It would be preferable to have drives RPC1. I wonder if making firmware RPC1 has become more difficult for ala42.


#4

[QUOTE=Ascii2;2657837]Thanks for the response deanwitty.

It would be preferable to have drives RPC1. I wonder if making firmware RPC1 has become more difficult for ala42.[/QUOTE]
You’re welcome.

Please feel free to ask ala42 yourself in this thread.


#5

[QUOTE=Ascii2;2657837]It would be preferable to have drives RPC1. I wonder if making firmware RPC1 has become more difficult for ala42.[/QUOTE]
I cannot speak for ala42, but in my opinion auto-reset patches have one big advantage over RPC1.

If a drive is RPC1, then the player software needs to keep track of your region changes and you at least need to have certain software to reset these changes. With RPC2, the player software has to let the drive take care of the region, meaning with auto-reset firmwares the whole job is done without the need of additional software.


#6

[QUOTE=Liggy;2657900]I cannot speak for ala42, but in my opinion auto-reset patches have one big advantage over RPC1.

If a drive is RPC1, then the player software needs to keep track of your region changes and you at least need to have certain software to reset these changes. With RPC2, the player software has to let the drive take care of the region, meaning with auto-reset firmwares the whole job is done without the need of additional software.[/QUOTE]

It was my understanding that [B]software [/B](software DVD players, operating systems, etc.)[B] could implement region restrictions, but are under no technical obligation to do so[/B]. Many might partner or enter into agreements which might require certain behaviors of the software (like region checking and enforcement).

It seems that 32-bit and 64-bit versions of Windows have a region enforcement system. Other operating systems like Linux and DOS do not seem to implement region restrictions on DVD media. Further their are software players for 32-bit and 64-bit Windows that disregard the Windows region setting and also claim to be able to play region coded DVDs of a region setting different than what is represented in many optical drive’s RPC-2 firmware.

In my opinion, RPC-1 should always be preferred to RPC-2. The software interference, should it exist, may be dealt with (rather easily). RPC-1 is also truly the only acceptable means for being region free (the auto reset firmwares will require powering down the DVD drive RPC-2 auto-rest region changes have been used up).

On a side note, it would be good it the Windows 2000/XP/Server 2003 DVD region checking/enforcement system could be patched to disable it.


#7

[QUOTE=Liggy;2657900]With RPC2, the player software has to let the drive take care of the region, meaning with auto-reset firmwares the whole job is done without the need of additional software.[/QUOTE]I forgot to mention that there also is no guarantee that software won’t enforce a region regardless the region setting in RPC-2 firmware (though I have never seen this implemented).