Blue dye CD

vbimport

#1

Hi!
I got a file from the Internet that I need to write on a CD.
They say that: “Only use media with a blue reflection layer”
and I’m willing to use blue dye discs, because my car’s CD-R did not recognize the CD by using any other disc.
For the first time I heard about dye color, started searching and found this site: http://www.cdmediaworld.com/hardware/cdrom/cd_dye.shtml
Found that I need a disc, that is made of Cyanine.
But sadly, I haven’t seen any CD that has blue dye in my life, also haven’t seen any of those companies, that are listed as manufacturers (except Pioneer).
Are these CDs still available on the market? Maybe some other brands exist, that are popular? Or maybe there is a place to order them?


#2

Hello regdude,
welcome to the forums! :bow:
Cyanine CD-Rs are still being manufactured by Taiyo Yuden (Japan) and they are easily the best CD-Rs you can get.
Where are you from?


#3

I’m from Latvia.
Haven’t seen any Taiyo Yuden discs in near shops.
I have read that Sony still makes these CDs, cost also twice more, but not sure if they are the right ones.


#4

Unfortunately, Sony does not produce any cyanine CD-Rs any longer.
99,9% of Sony branded CD-Rs are made by their OEM partners in India and Taiwan and the rest is produced by Sony DADC Salzburg in Austria. All current Sony CD-R media are based on phtalocyanine (“green”) dyes.

You can get some Taiyo Yuden made CD-Rs here:
http://www.ss.lv/msg/lv/electronics/audio-video-dvd-sat/dvd-and-video-technics/dvd-disks-mpeg-cassettes/flbig.html
http://aio.lv/lv/supplies/media/cd-r80hp10/


#5

I used to get Sony brand “music CD-R” here in the USA that was made by TY. This is the stuff made to work in set top recorders. If it says “made in Japan” on the wrapper, its TY.


#6

Well then I will have to look more for them.
Thanks for the help!


#7

My querry on this is the definition of “blue”

I remember the old original “Blue discs” which were a really nice
"Sapphire blue" color, but those old discs were SLOW burning
and have been discontinued for a decade or more.
I believe they used an “Azo” dye.

Then there were the “Blue-Green” discs like the T-Y made Sony “Audio” CD-R discs (discontinued) but are still made and sold under other brands.
I believe these are the “Cyanine” dye discs

Then finally there are the pthalo-cyanine dye discs that are
a pale green-gold color.

The old “Azo” discs were fantastic for long term stability but as previously mentioned were “creeping death” to burn and were
expen$ive. I have some Azo discs burned a decade ago that have been stored in my truck (parked outside in the sun) and those discs still play in my media-player.

But then again my vehicle media player will play CD-RW discs too, and as it will play any variety of DVD (including the elusive DVD-RAM discs) it isn’t exactly picky about what it’ll play.

THE thing to remember about the various discs is that unless there are burn tables in the firmware of the burner you want to burn them with the discs (And/or the drive) are useless relics.

last week I tossed two milk crates full of CD-RW drives, why?
because it just isn’t worth fighting with drives that don’t play nice with currently available discs… or Vice-versa


#8

[QUOTE=AllanDeGroot;2645651]My querry on this is the definition of “blue”

I remember the old original “Blue discs” which were a really nice
"Sapphire blue" color, but those old discs were SLOW burning
and have been discontinued for a decade or more.
I believe they used an “Azo” dye.

[/QUOTE]

Made by Verbatim, these were also cyanine, just an earlier formula.

I still have some, in the form of the “Digital Vinyl” discs that look like 45RPM records.


#9

[QUOTE=regdude;2645469]Hi!
[I]I got a file from the Internet[/I] that I need to write on a CD.
They say that: “[B]Only use media with a blue reflection layer[/B]”
[/QUOTE]

I wonder - whats the purpose of this??