Blockbuster closes 300 retail stores – can’t compete with Netflix

vbimport

#1

We’ve just posted the following news: Blockbuster closes 300 retail stores – can’t compete with Netflix[newsimage]http://static.myce.com//images_posts/2012/01/BlockbusterLogo.jpg[/newsimage]

Video rental chain Blockbuster will close its last 300 retail stores by January 2014.

            Read the full article here: [http://www.myce.com/news/blockbuster-closes-300-retail-stores-cant-compete-with-netflix-69485/](http://www.myce.com/news/blockbuster-closes-300-retail-stores-cant-compete-with-netflix-69485/)

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#2

I wish I could be sad for the demise of Blockbuster, but I’m not. I rarely if ever rent movies anymore (I mostly rely on VOD, and am dabbling in streaming), and when I do, I usually get something from Redbox. I can’t remember the last time I set foot in a Blockbuster store. I still see a few Family Video outlets here and there, but I expect those will also go the way of the T-Rex eventually.


#3

This makes me sad. I called this years ago and had a ton of viable ways for them to stay afloat. Their management must all be related to that of BlackBerry/RIM. Too many fat cats who don’t see what’s coming around the corner. The “Too big to fail” syndrome. I have fond memories of visiting the local Blockbuster/Jumbo Video/whatever to pick out a movie for a guy night/date/etc. I wish I could take my son and wife out and pick a flick from the “wall of movies”, but those days are gone. My 6 year old boy will never know the excitement of going to pick out a movie from a myriad of options on a Friday or Saturday afternoon and maybe pick up some overpriced popcorn/pop/candy at the checkout. I guess buying a recent release Blu-ray at Best Buy or Future Shop will have to suffice.


#4

I shed not a tear at their loss. When I first traveled in the US in 2002 and 2003, we went thru many places that had ma-n-pa video-stores being shutdown because a Blockbuster or HollywoodVideo was opening down the street.

They smashed thousands of those businesses - tens of thousands, perhaps. So now they’re enjoying that fate themselves. No tears for them.


#5

The saddest thing is that now people [I]are[/I] renting from RedBox and consequently limiting themselves to the 100 or so movies they carry.


#6

It’s sad not Blockbuster closing, but almost every video rental closing.
And as olyteddy posted, people are limiting themselves to what movies their onlise service as.
But it’s the modern ages, people only want big stores huge malls, and not work for anything.
In the “dark ages” when i was young, we had to go downtown and walk the streets going from store to store, to buy our food, clothes, etc…, now we want to buy all in the same place, and with video we are even too lazy to get out of the house!!!
Sooner or later we are going to pay the price, as Blockbuster killed small video stores, now netflix kills Blockbuster, and in some years there’s no competition, and we pay what they want to watch what they want, as there will be only one or two service providers!!!
This will happen in all markets, video, food, clothes, electronics, there will be only two or three big chains that control the market and the price of things.
Think about the quality of service and the price you pay for the cellphone company, internet, cable TV!!! There are only a couple of chains ruling the market and even those are merging…


#7

In a way it is sad–make it a blockbuster night became an iconic branding in the 90’s. It was always fun going into a video store and trying to pick out a film or a video game to rent.


#8

I guess it’s bittersweet?

Back in the hey day Blockbuster was my last choice. They were the most expensive place to rent movies from. I would try and rent from a local chain first and blockbuster was one of my last choices.

That being said I still used them a fair mount. They sheer quantity of new releases they had on hand was impressive. They were always the one spot you could get a new release and the odds of it being sold out were slim.

Now were in the 21st century and they’ve become obscelete. DVD/Bluray sort of took the reigns and if people want the physical product they buy it instead of rent it. For everyone else there is netflix, xbox market place etc…

I’m still surprise Dish paid as much as they did for it.


#9

One thing that these national chains did was survive longer in areas without broadband services, so they were a good counterpoint to the fallacy of “streaming is everywhere”. But Netflix does an even more thorough job, thanks to the postal system.

There’s a small town two hours away that has a surviving ma-n-pa shop, with still about 3,000 videotapes and 1,000 DVDs for their locals. Doris Day’s WHERE WERE YOU WHEN THE LIGHTS WENT OUT is there on VHS. So’s MONSTER OF PIEDRAS BLANCAS and INVASION OF THE SAUCER MEN.


#10

I use Block Buster by mail and I like it. Rent 3 movies and either mail them back or use in-store exchange for new release on Tuesday. Good service with very bad customer support people left because the support.
When Dish took over Block Buster the store manager said within a year they would be closed, yup she was right. A few months ago she said that Dish was trying to sell BB but had no buyers wonder why.

On an odd note how many swap meet movie pirates are going under because of this? Every Tuesday morning a guy would go to the local BB rent the new releases and go to his car. Would not leave the parking lot till he returned the movies.


#11

MrLoren, did he at least pull the shades? (I am thinking of the SEINFELD “Am I a Van Guy?” episode. If it’s rockin’, don’t come a-knockin’…)

Or else it’s the modern-day Cheech & Chong “open car doors” joke, this time with USB cords and power-charges dangling out.