Beware the 1080p HD scam on small screens

vbimport

#1

Beware the 1080p HD scam on small screens.

[newsimage]http://static.rankone.nl/images_posts/2010/08/NlnZkd.jpg[/newsimage]Are you in the market for a small HDTV? If you opt for a 1080p model that is less than 46 inches you may be paying too much, according to new information released by the Los Angeles Times.


Read the full article here: [http://www.myce.com/news/beware-the-1080p-hd-scam-on-small-screens-33243/](http://www.myce.com/news/beware-the-1080p-hd-scam-on-small-screens-33243/)


Please note that the reactions from the complete site will be synched below.

#2
  1. Uniformity of electronics with larger models?
  2. 22" TV’s double as PC monitors :wink:

Seriously! Who buys a 22" TV unless it’s for tucking away in the kitchen (or elsewhere) or for Dual use as a monitor?
In this case, you’re probably going to be relatively close to the TV away, so you WILL benefit from the finer resolution, and benefits of the finer resolution for monitors is obvious.

This issue has been debated to death for the last 5 years.
People with good eyes will see the difference between 720p & 1080p depending on screen size & distance. Many can’t tell the difference between a HDTV and the old CRT TV’s.

With the introduction of HDMI on Video cards now, the debate is a non-issue.

Note This comment was typed on a laptop with 15" screen with 1920x1080 resolution. And I saw the 720p version before deciding on the 1080p version.


#3

The idea that only screen size determines whether you can see 720p or 1080p is ridiculous and utterly wrong!

The distance you sit from the screen is just as important as the size of the screen. If you sit one foot away from a 26" screen you can definitely see the difference between 720p and 1080p, but if you sit twenty feet away from a 50" screen you probably can’t.

The only ripoff scam here is people paying L.A. Times for writing this kind of “news”. :stuck_out_tongue:


#4

I think the point is, if you’re using the display for TV/movie viewing only, you’ll most likely never be sitting/standing close enough to see the difference on a smaller TV. And, as the article notes, if you’re using the small display as a monitor as well, then you will take advantage.


#5

I have heard this and its bullocks. Our eyes can discern far higher resolutions that this at smaller sizes. If people can’t tell the difference its because the video processor is crap or some other factor.


#6

[QUOTE=DrageMester;2538590]The idea that only screen size determines whether you can see 720p or 1080p is ridiculous and utterly wrong!

The distance you sit from the screen is just as important as the size of the screen. If you sit one foot away from a 26" screen you can definitely see the difference between 720p and 1080p, but if you sit twenty feet away from a 50" screen you probably can’t.

The only ripoff scam here is people paying L.A. Times for writing this kind of “news”. :p[/QUOTE]
:iagree:

[QUOTE=Blu-rayFreak;2538690]I think the point is, if you’re using the display for TV/movie viewing only, you’ll most likely never be sitting/standing close enough to see the difference on a smaller TV. And, as the article notes, if you’re using the small display as a monitor as well, then you will take advantage.[/QUOTE]
:iagree:

[QUOTE=ivid;2538711]I have heard this and its bullocks. Our eyes can discern far higher resolutions that this at smaller sizes. If people can’t tell the difference its because the video processor is crap or some other factor.[/QUOTE]
:iagree:

Yet again, human stupidity, general laziness and complete ignorance have been combined to generate a “news” story :iagree:

Is it just me, or does “news” these days seem to be more bum-fluff and less research & accuracy?

Or was it always like that, and now that I’m older and more cynical, I just notice it more?


#7

Unless it’s more than 2000x2000 resolution then sorry I still have better than 20x20 so I can see the difference between 720p and 1080p even on a 9" screen… going to look for the this guys article so I can go laugh at him on his own site.

They don’t seem to have the article on their site guess they where too embarrassed to post it there.


#8

Its realy no use having 1080p unless your going to be using it fully for graphics and xbox 360 bluray etc for normal tv and sky hd virgin is only 1080i which realy is 720p so u wont see any difference. CRT was better because sharpness was greater and people on there looked more real than plastic.

raf


#9

You do the math, but the human eye can only determine 300dpi (Dots per inch), any greater and you cannot determine the difference. (quoted for what Apple told us about the iPhone 4’s HD Screen)


#10

[QUOTE=ed205gti;2538951]You do the math, but the human eye can only determine 300dpi (Dots per inch), any greater and you cannot determine the difference. (quoted for what Apple told us about the iPhone 4’s HD Screen)[/QUOTE]

This is partly true as the screen gets smaller then it would be a strain to keep up with resolution.

the formula for this is = 1080p DPI use (2203/TVsize).

so say a 50" would have a DPI at 44.06 which is no problem keeping up with resolution.
now take an Iphone which has a 3.5 inch screen would be 629 dpi but since it isnt a 1080p screen then it would be 163 ppi not dpi as the screen is 320 x 480 not 1920 x 1080 lol


#11

[QUOTE=debro;2538561]1) Uniformity of electronics with larger models?
2) 22" TV’s double as PC monitors :wink:

Seriously! Who buys a 22" TV unless it’s for tucking away in the kitchen (or elsewhere) or for Dual use as a monitor?
In this case, you’re probably going to be relatively close to the TV away, so you WILL benefit from the finer resolution, and benefits of the finer resolution for monitors is obvious.

This issue has been debated to death for the last 5 years.
People with good eyes will see the difference between 720p & 1080p depending on screen size & distance. Many can’t tell the difference between a HDTV and the old CRT TV’s.

With the introduction of HDMI on Video cards now, the debate is a non-issue.

Note This comment was typed on a laptop with 15" screen with 1920x1080 resolution. And I saw the 720p version before deciding on the 1080p version.[/QUOTE]

I completely agree.

If you read this article on your computer, laptop, smart phone, or iPad, then you can already tell the difference between 720P and 1080P when viewing a small display — close up (within 2 feet)! But if you are going to watch movies or TV at a greater distance, then you need a bigger screen; still capable of displaying 1080P, or better.

My career is designing Ultimate Home Theaters, and in that pursuit I utilize the biggest screen dimensions possible. In order to fully immerse your senses, I feature Sony and JVC 4K projectors ( 4,096 x 2,160P & 2,400P ), whose near 10 Megapixel displays can also create ravishing 3D images, with twice again the information going to each eye (nearly 20 Megapixels @ 60P)!

My advice is to always get 1080P displays or better and watch the biggest images, possible. Today, there are worthwhile DLP projectors available for the same price as a flat panel of 50" or so that offer far more compelling picture quality than you will likely see even at the best movie theaters in the world — save for my own.

Cheers -

Jeremy

Kipnis Studios (KSS)

www.Kipnis-Studios.com


#12

This soon will be a non-factor. Over here, I simply can’t find any 720p LCD TVs anymore. Everything is 1080p. Computer monitor screens are not there yet but are following the same trend.


#13

[QUOTE=guru2u;2538968]This is partly true as the screen gets smaller then it would be a strain to keep up with resolution.

the formula for this is = 1080p DPI use (2203/TVsize).

so say a 50" would have a DPI at 44.06 which is no problem keeping up with resolution.
now take an Iphone which has a 3.5 inch screen would be 629 dpi but since it isnt a 1080p screen then it would be 163 ppi not dpi as the screen is 320 x 480 not 1920 x 1080 lol[/QUOTE]

CORRECTION: The iPhone 4 has a HD screen ‘RETINA’ - 960-by-640-pixel resolution at 326 ppi

The point is that if your screen has over 300 ppi/dpi (Pixels per inch) you will not be able to determine the difference in quality, even from a 3.5inch to 50inch screen.


#14

[QUOTE=ed205gti;2539351]CORRECTION: The iPhone 4 has a HD screen ‘RETINA’ - 960-by-640-pixel resolution at 326 ppi

The point is that if your screen has over 300 ppi/dpi (Pixels per inch) you will not be able to determine the difference in quality, even from a 3.5inch to 50inch screen.[/QUOTE]

thanks for correction but the figures i gave were for the iphone in general not iphone 4. obviously the iphone 4 better lol