Best Way to Keep CD/DVD

vbimport

#1

Since I started backing up various forms of media into cd several years ago, I have accumulated about 800 cd. I keep them in brand name cd folders (CD Project) for better protection. Yet periodically I see noticeable stratches in the back side of my cd. I can still play even my oldest ones, but I have concerns over their lifespan.

I store my cds into either 208 or 312 cd folders. Everytime I have to take my cd out of the folder, I try my best not to lift it out so that the back of my cd would rub the fabric of the folder’s pocket.

Recently I bought a skipdr cd repair kit to “fix” the stratches in some of my cd. It turned out that the back of cd looked worst after I had done the fixing procedure.

Now that I’m going to turn my cd into dvd. What would be the best way to maintain my new dvd disc? I think black jewel cases, those made with soft plastic as oppose to hard transparent plastic cover, seems to be the best. However they take up a lot of space.

Regards,
PHI


#2

The only way to avoid wear is to use storage that does not touch the disc surface. Either jewel cases or a spindle.


#3

don’t touch them to much…if you need to… pick them up in the center…or use when of those suction thingies

keep them dry and out of the sun…

and if you can…make back ups

i bought myself a "map’which can contain 300 dvd’s/cd’s. It has soft pockets to put them in. WHen the cd is in the pocket…the center is still clear so you can get them out easily with out needing to touch the data area


#4

i have found that some media scratches much easier than others. do any of you agree, if so what media to you think is the most durable?


#5

Originally posted by rdgrimes
The only way to avoid wear is to use storage that does not touch the disc surface. Either jewel cases or a spindle.

Transporting cd’s and dvd’s in non-sealed spindles makes them easily scratched. As long as you not plan to transport them regulary , spindles are ok.

Best storage method is under room temperatur (21 Celcuis) , normal humidity and minimum of sunlight. Black dvd cases or maps are excellent for this , though take up most space.

The media most durable i’ve seen is that from Hi-Space.


#6

thanks, i’ll have to try some hi space out sometime.


#7

Case Logic 64 or 128 CD/DVD wallet. I use these exclusively for DVD backups. DivX movie backups on CDRs go in the empty 100/cake spindles.


#8

I use CD Sleeves and they work perfectly fine for me.


#9

Hi all
I use a case logic wallet 120cds as I find jewel cases much too bulky. So far ok and I am always careful not to touch the reading surface.

I have never tried a scratch remover, sounds dubious but cds are suppose to tolerate radially scratches

On the subject of cleaning cds, my experience to date

a) NEVER us acetone nail polish remover, dissolves cds a treat

b) alway clean outwards radially not in a circular manner. Use the softest of cloths (cotton wool is abrasive) sometimes used to clean vynil records

c) I have been using iso propyl alcohol (IPA or rubbing alcohol) to remove grease from fingerprints - other people. I am not sure about the legitimacy of this - any comments?

d) I ve heard that mild luke warm detergent can also be used - any comments?

Keep cool around room temp

Store away from direct sunlight

What about a firesafe cabinet?


#10

What about a firesafe cabinet?

What are you? Nuts? What do you have on those discs? Britney Spears porn? All you have to do is keep them in a cool dry place like top shelf of a closet and you’re set.

As for cleaning CD/DVDs, just use water. Some people use distilled water, but I say if you’re that anal, filtered water w/ PUR or that other filter brand should work just as well. I’d like to use optics cleaning cloth for my glasses/shades, but those are quit expensive. I need to snatch a couple next time I visit my optometrist.

And for those asses who hold CD/DVDs by the surface. Fscking quit it! You’re killing my DVD player when I rent DVD movies. Bastards be eating Cheetos and fondling DVDs at once… man, I should stone you in the public.


#11

Actually, I use a FireKing Media Vault for business critical backups. It’s important to distinguish between a “fire safe” and a “media vault”. Computer media generally has a 125’F max temp rating. Most “fire-safes” are rated for 350’F, which is not nearly adequate. If I have a fire, my “vault” will have to be cut open with a saw, but my stuff will be intact inside. It’s also too damn heavy for some thief to walk away with. :bigsmile:


#12

Hi Stoner and grimes

I prefer jennifer lopez porn thats available locally myself and wouldnt keep that in a confined space it might auto-ignite.

But sderiously, safety of CDs is important . I am sure most people are probably rather lax about this and take it all for granted. I probably used the wrong word Firesafe, but some practical method of storing important data and programs should be considered rather than just hrowing them into a case logic wallet.

On the subject of CD security, my reasearches into the long term reliability of CDRs is taking on ominous proportions. I have come across several people now who have suffered from mysterious degradation of CDRs after about a year. I am gathering all the info I can get on this topic and will present my findings to this excellent site. Ill pass it to the admin first cos I dont know which subject it would best be suited. There is no specific topic on CD reliability.

Keep the faith

headcase


#13

th emedia forum is the place for such things. In fact, there are older threads on the same subject.
the most common reason for CDR’s failing is that they were poorly burned to start with, and they are crappy media to boot. Error rates increase over time to the point that they are no longer readable.


#14

I suggest you read this…

http://club.cdfreaks.com/showthread.php?s=&threadid=67645

to decide for yourself about these wallets…


#15

My personal experience and findings on CDR storage safety.

You need to look out for:

  • heat changes (not just max/min temps)
  • humidity changes (not just max/min relative humidity)
  • mechanical stress (abrasion, bending, warping, very small dirt, etc)
  • electromagnetic radiation (particularly near UV and UV)
  • writing procedures (i.e. only write on the transparent center of the disc)
  • chemical contact (solvents in particular, but also high ozone content or heavily ionized air)
  • handling (proper procedures, equipment, read speeds, etc)

In practise most cd wallets (by Caselogic or any other name) have a few problems: they don’t protect from mechanical stress and actually the most vulnerable part of the disc (the label side) is usually pitted against the label side of another disc. Most wallets do not cover the label side 100%. Also, they offer less protection from abrasion with small dust.

Be aware also that some cheaper wallets I’ve seen do not use acid free plastic in the sleeves. This could turn out to be a problem in the long run.

CD jewel cases are quite space taking to store, if you have many discs. Some professionals use specialized cd storage systems, but these are quite expensive.

As for most durable scratch resistant discs, my votes go to:

Emtec Ceram Guard (made by Tayio Yuden and getting hard to get as Emtec reorganises)

Verbatim Crystal Super Azo (made by Mitsubishi Chemicals)

Regards,
Halcyon

PS Some material to look up, if you’re interested.

http://www.archives.state.co.us/cpa/articles/audiovisual/careofcds.htm

http://ikrweb.uni-muenster.de/aptdir/aktuelles/archivmedien.html

http://www.osta.org/technology/cdqa12.htm

http://www.osta.org/technology/cdqa13.htm


#16

WalMart (and probably others) sells a CD storage case that has flip-out semi-circular ‘troughs’ that hold the CD just by the very edge (a bit like an old fashioned jukebox) which I would think would be a very safe way of storing them, and take less space than individual cases.