Best way to convert 192kb mp3s to 128?

vbimport

#1

i got a @#!$load of 192kb mp3s and they are rather large… was wondering the best way to convert them down to 128, which should reduce the size of the file while keeping the quality?

Thanks in advance…


#2

There’s no way of “keeping the quality” when you re-encode MP3s. Even if you encode from 192 to 192 again or even from 192 up to 320, you’ll always lose a bit of quality because each encoding process of MP3 is lossy (this is also true for WMA, Ogg Vorbis etc - all lossy encoders). How much you lose depends on the bitrate and settings you use for this transcoding. From 192 down to 128 would cost you quite a bit of quality, so I’d avoid it at all costs. 192 is not that big after all.


#3

if you convert 192 -> 128 you will loose quality.
i dont recommend encode mp3 from a previous lossy format.


#4

Buy a larger storage device or suffer. Don’t downgrade the quality of your MP3’s.


#5

Thanks guys… I got a 250gig HD, so I will keep the 192’s… didn’t realize they would be so big, but its not the end of the world…


#6

I am agree with the gays.but if you like you can try CDex 1.51


#7

“GAYS” ??? :(:(:(:(:frowning:


#8

:smiley: Hahaha, he probably meant “guys”; at least I hope it for him :stuck_out_tongue:


#9

Sorry guys :sad:


#10

we are joking :p:p:p
no problems


#11

How good is this program? Does it work without quality loss?


#12

There is no way to convert to a lossy format without quality loss. Hence the nomer, LOSSY.


#13

Well duh… I guess I meant sound quality loss… Will the converted tracks appear, to my ears, similar or will the difference be noticible?


#14

It depends on how well you can hear, and if you have any experience llistening for “artifacts”.

I really can’t say for you; the only way to tell is to listen for youself.
If you don’t hear any difference, then great! You might as well keep doing things the same. :slight_smile:


#15

Especially, if you use high quality headphones - you wil hear everything you want to hear, and some that you don’t! On speakers, maybe not.


#16

hmmm…I have been downgrading from 192 and 320 to 160, my optimum desired settings, using Sound Forge. Would I be losing quality even with an excellent program such as Sound Forge or CoolEdit, or is it the inherent lossiness of the MP3 format itself that does me in, eventually? Moreover, I just didn’t want to mess around with the relatively large FLAC format files, despite it being non-lossy.

I have also been using the excellent MP3Gain to normalize levels of all my files. I am wondering if this could also result in sound degradation…?

Also, can anyone tell me how to preserve as much of the quality of MP3 files after processing them because I do modify pitch, volume, and edit out noise, pops, clicks, etc. Would converting them to wave before applying processing help?


#17

Maybe nobody knows the answers here…will take this to the Audiograbber forum.


#18

You can try JetAudio Pro, you can batch process the files with it as well. It has a conversion function built into it and it works pretty well, I have used it to do alot of conversions.

Peace and Luv,

DJ Mind


#19

It does not matter what software you use. Transcoding MP3s always results in quality loss, regardless of whether you re-encode to lower or higher bitrate. Not only does encoding to MP3 removes some signal information from the source, it also adds quantization noise (to mask artifacts) that is normally inadible. On the second pass, however, it becomes considerably more prominent; things go quickly downhill from there.
Lossy compression formats like MP3 are designed to be effective with uncompressed full-spectrum sources only. Compressed source audio throws a monkey wrnch into their algorythms’ delicately balanced works

I have also been using the excellent MP3Gain to normalize levels of all my files. I am wondering if this could also result in sound degradation…?
It will not if you don’t let the sound level clip.Also you have to keep in mind that many albums were recorded with songs being of intentionally different volume - particularly true of classical recordings. You should use Album Gain on those, to preserve the differences the artist/composer/producer intended.

Also, can anyone tell me how to preserve as much of the quality of MP3 files after processing them because I do modify pitch, volume, and edit out noise, pops, clicks, etc. Would converting them to wave before applying processing help?

There are very few operations you can perform on an MP3 without having to re-encode it to save the results (which leads to inevitable quality loss as explained above). Only volume changes with MP3Gain and cutting/merging with musiCutter are lossless and fully reversible.
Converting to WAV before editing is OK, but don’t re-compress your results - burn them straight to CD-R as audio CD.