Best Video Editing Software? - Vote Now!

vbimport

#1

A simple poll to gather information on people’s favourite video editing software.


#2

You forgot some others… for example:

[ul]
[li]Womble MPEG Video Wizard (which gets my vote)
[/li][li]VideoReDo TV Suite (a close second)
[/li][/ul]


#3

Two more:

Right up there beside the Premiere Pro is [B]Final Cut Pro[/B], and some like the [B]Avid Pinnacle Suite[/B] too

:cool:


#4

Obviously, it depends on what you are editing.

For professional high-end broadcast/film work where budget is not an issue, I would say Autodesk Smoke. It handles 4K better than most any other editor, including the Avid DS Nitris.

For editing TV shows (for your private collection) captured in MPEG 2 via a tuner card on the PC, Womble MPEG Video Wizard is the best.


#5

VideoReDo TV Suite 4 would get my vote.


#6

Womble MPEG DVD Wizard is still one of the best, Sony Vegas 8 Pro is very good but expensive and finished video footage cannot be played on an CRT television or monitor due to picture shimmering, finished video must be in the ‘progressive scan’ mode.:rolleyes:


#7

[QUOTE=nicadair;2525113]Womble MPEG DVD Wizard is still one of the best, Sony Vegas 8 Pro is very good but expensive and finished video footage cannot be played on an CRT television or monitor due to picture shimmering, finished video must be in the ‘progressive scan’ mode.:rolleyes:[/QUOTE]

That’s because Vegas, like most other video editing software, does a very poor job of resizing interlaced footage. I’ve done this in the past, but now use someting else to convert HD to SD.


#8

I’ve used Corel Video Studio X2 on a few occasions and found it very straight forward to use, including subtitles, transitions, picture-in-picture and so on. A good example is my SSD vs HDD video, where I pulled in video from my camera, screen captured footage (recorded with CamStudio) and still images. Corel has X3 out now, which apparently has a new GUI, however, I haven’t tried it.

For more advanced Video editing, especially Full HD, I would suggest giving Sony Vegas a try, at least its trial version. I’ve heard a lot of good things about it from those using it, especially those who got fed up with Adobe Premiere.


#9

[QUOTE=Seán;2525686]For more advanced Video editing, especially Full HD, I would suggest giving Sony Vegas a try, at least its trial version. I’ve heard a lot of good things about it from those using it, especially those who got fed up with Adobe Premiere.[/QUOTE]

Until recently, Vegas Movie Studio lacked the capability of authoring menued high-definition discs at all; the menus were compatible only with standard-definition DVD (Blu-ray/AVCHD DVD authoring with version 9 was possible only from the Vegas timeline, which did not support menus). That was the limitation of DVD Architect Studio 4.5, which came with the previous release of Vegas Movie Studio (version 9). But with the very recent release of Vegas Movie Studio HD 10 Platinum and Platinum Production Suite (both of which come with the new DVD Architect Studio 5), the consumer Vegas programs can now author menued HD Blu-ray and AVCHD DVD discs in addition to menued SD DVDs.

As for the cheapest version of Vegas, Vegas Movie Studio HD (standard), it can work with HD content but lacks any HD or SD disc authoring capability whatsoever. In addition, the number of supported export formats are more limited than its pricier Platinum versions.

And since we were talking about the ~$100 consumer video editing packages, all of them are currently strictly 32-bit. Hence, they cannot use more than about 2GB of installed system RAM even if your system has far more than that and is running a 64-bit operating system.