Best Video Dubbing Software

vbimport

#1

I want to know what is the best easy to use video dubbing/editing software?

I want to take out the ads in a video I recorded.
John


#2

Welcome to the forum bigjohn1945, :slight_smile:

Moving your thread over to the ‘Video Edit Software’ subforum :wink:


#3

What format is your video? Is this a tv show that you have recorded with ads interspersed?

If it is mpeg2 you can use VideoReDo TV Suite. It has an automatic ad detection capability to find and mark the ads. Then you simply save the file and the ads will be removed (provided you don’t mess with the default setting to automatically cut the detected ads).

VideoReDo TV Suite is not free, but has a fully functional trial for you to download and try. You can output as mpeg files or as a complete dvd-video.


#4

Its says its just an MPEG file it was copied from a TV show directly to a flash drive via the USB port from a set top box.
How do I determine what kind of an MPEG file it is? Or is there only one kind of MPEG video file.
Thanks
John


#5

There is mpeg1 and mpeg2. VideoReDo should be able to handle either type, and mpeg2 is far more common these days.


#6

[QUOTE=Kerry56;2498909]What format is your video? Is this a tv show that you have recorded with ads interspersed?

If it is mpeg2 you can use VideoReDo TV Suite. It has an automatic ad detection capability to find and mark the ads. Then you simply save the file and the ads will be removed (provided you don’t mess with the default setting to automatically cut the detected ads).

VideoReDo TV Suite is not free, but has a fully functional trial for you to download and try. You can output as mpeg files or as a complete dvd-video.[/QUOTE]

I have the most recent release of it. It has not been updated (other than betas) in nearly two years (the current “released” version came out back in late July of 2008).

Also, a lot of so-called “720p” video files from television may have been interlaced originals which had been converted to 720/60p. In this case, one would have to be careful where to make the cuts; otherwise, the field order may be thrown off once the video is converted to 480i for standard-definition DVD.

Finally, if your source videos are in 1080i and you intend to use VideoReDo to create and author a standard-definition DVD, you’re out of luck: I found that the encoder in VideoReDo, like most encoders in other video editing software, do a very poor job of resizing interlaced material. This is because very, very few of them use the correct resizing alogarithm (and the NLEs which do this resizing correctly without the aid of third-party plugins are astronomically expensive - priced in the tens of thousands to hundreds of thousands of dollars). As a result, you need VirtualDub and/or AviSynth (both of them freeware video processing programs, and most of the plugins available for those two are also free downloads) in addition to your video editor of your choice in order to do this resizing of interlaced material “correctly.”


#7

As I do have file conversion software installed, would it be better to convert the files to .avi or a more manageable type of file?


#8

I’ve never used VideoRedo for HD tv captures, only standard definition. It has worked flawlessly for me on those. I tend to do manual cuts with it though, and not use the automatic search for commercials.


#9

I went and purchased VideoReDo software, and one of my MPEG files were damaged and Quickstream repaired that one as well as removed all the advertisements, it amazing how much of the file you remove when the ads are removed!
Many thanks for your input!


#10

[QUOTE=Kerry56;2498920]I’ve never used VideoRedo for HD tv captures, only standard definition. It has worked flawlessly for me on those. I tend to do manual cuts with it though, and not use the automatic search for commercials.[/QUOTE]

As for HDTV captures, I do use it mainly to strip away the ASF wrapper from the .dvr-ms files recorded in Windows Media Center (there is no Windows 7/Vista-compatible DVR software available for my Theater 650 PCI-e card unless I go to a completely third-party company, and the last version of ATi’s DVR software splits long recordings into files no larger than 4GB and many of the split videos have noticeable audio sync problems). Then, I transfer the edited file to another video-editing program or processing program for the reconversion/transcode.

Perhaps I should give in and replace the card with one from a different brand?


#11

[QUOTE=RJL65;2499064]As for HDTV captures, I do use it mainly to strip away the ASF wrapper from the .dvr-ms files recorded in Windows Media Center (there is no Windows 7/Vista-compatible DVR software available for my Theater 650 PCI-e card unless I go to a completely third-party company, and the last version of ATi’s DVR software splits long recordings into files no larger than 4GB and many of the split videos have noticeable audio sync problems). Then, I transfer the edited file to another video-editing program or processing program for the reconversion/transcode.

Perhaps I should give in and replace the card with one from a different brand?[/QUOTE]

Have you used Sage Tv? It will work with your card.


#12

[QUOTE=bigjohn1945;2498911]Its says its just an MPEG file it was copied from a TV show directly to a flash drive via the USB port from a set top box.
How do I determine what kind of an MPEG file it is? Or is there only one kind of MPEG video file.
Thanks
John[/QUOTE]

Usually thats mpeg4 AVC stuff in transport stream format or TRP format.


#13

[QUOTE=~Jethro~;2499068]Have you used Sage Tv? It will work with your card.[/QUOTE]

I’m thinking about it. Having relied on Windows Media Center alone on Windows Vista, and now Windows 7, I was used to multistep, multi-format conversions. With Windows 7’s Media Center now recording to .wtv instead of .dvr-ms, Microsoft wisely includes a .wtv to .dvr-ms converter in Windows 7. I used the converter to create a .dvr-ms copy, then imported the .dvr-ms copy into VideoReDo to strip away the ASF wrapper (creating a new .mpg file in the process). All that is done without recompressing the video. Although this process takes just a few minutes, the number of steps that are required to do this seems a bit excessive.

The advantage of paying the $79 price for SageTV is that the TV shows are recorded directly to a .ts file, which can then be demuxed in the program for export to those video editing software programs which require elementary streams.


#14

[QUOTE=RJL65;2499064]As for HDTV captures, I do use it mainly to strip away the ASF wrapper from the .dvr-ms files recorded in Windows Media Center (there is no Windows 7/Vista-compatible DVR software available for my Theater 650 PCI-e card unless I go to a completely third-party company, and the last version of ATi’s DVR software splits long recordings into files no larger than 4GB and many of the split videos have noticeable audio sync problems). Then, I transfer the edited file to another video-editing program or processing program for the reconversion/transcode.[/QUOTE]

I’ve since played around with VideoReDo further, and found out that I could create edited elementary streams which could then be sent directly to a DVD or Blu-ray authoring program without having to go through another piece of video editing software although I sometimes had to rename the extension of the video files to make them compatible with certain authoring software. And if the streams were compliant and closely matched to my authoring software’s settings, the authoring software would not recompress the content. (Remember, over-the-air HD programming in the U.S. is always delivered in MPEG-2 - and transcoding this to AVC takes too much time for zero image quality gain unless I intend to burn this content in HD onto regular DVD rather than Blu-ray disc.)