Best lossless way to rip camcorder files

vbimport

#1

Great site! Thanks to all you well informed AV experts who so freely share your knowledge.

My question is what is the best choice for a file format to select when ripping video files from my camcorder, presuming I would like to retain the full quality of the file but not take up GB’s per minute on my HD. I want to start re-using my DV tapes, cause it gets expensive to keep buynig new ones, but I am fearful of loosing quality that I cannot detect now with my limited display options but which may become more noticeable at some point in the future when I can afford a larger / higher def display.

Thanks in advance for your help


#2

Moved to Video Edit forum.


#3

It is actually pretty inexpensive to purchase mini-dv tapes, especially, if you watch for sales, and use office max, staples, etc, coupons… And it is the best way to store your video in a lossless format. Other than that, I would suggest watching for deals on hard drives, buy an external enclosure, and store your video on an external HD. I have bought numerous 160gb - 200gb hd’s, for around $40.00. That is pretty inexpensive long term storage… Plus I save all of my recorded mini-dv tapes. I usually pick up the 5 packs for less than $10.00.
Just make sure you stick with a single brand of mini-dv tapes. I have read many reports of users complaining about dirty heads on their camcorders, after changing brands of tape. Manufactures use different methods/materials for making the tapes, and changing brands can lead to problems.


#4

[QUOTE=harley2ride;2074899]It is actually pretty inexpensive to purchase mini-dv tapes, especially, if you watch for sales, and use office max, staples, etc, coupons… And it is the best way to store your video in a lossless format. Other than that, I would suggest watching for deals on hard drives, buy an external enclosure, and store your video on an external HD. I have bought numerous 160gb - 200gb hd’s, for around $40.00. That is pretty inexpensive long term storage… Plus I save all of my recorded mini-dv tapes. I usually pick up the 5 packs for less than $10.00.
Just make sure you stick with a single brand of mini-dv tapes. I have read many reports of users complaining about dirty heads on their camcorders, after changing brands of tape. Manufactures use different methods/materials for making the tapes, and changing brands can lead to problems.[/QUOTE]
I agree with everything, double for the highlighted part.
:iagree::iagree:


#5

A good workflow is to transfer the tapes by FireWire (lossless) -> edit the footage -> author to DVD. I agree with the other guys that tape is cheap so I wouldn’t recycle them either.


#6

ok, let me rephrase. What is the best lossless way to transfer my miniDV taped videos to the computer? There are so many choices even within the Windows Video capture software and it is unclear to me which ones are lossless or how to determine what the frame rate or density, etc. of the source is so I can best match it up to the file type created on the computer?

As far as keeping tapes, I see 2 issues, the first being that I do not trust long term storage of any tape. I have VHS tapes from the 80’s that are no longer functional due to stickiness of the tape leading to breakage or binding.

The second being cost and space. Since I do not know the data density of the tape I don’t know the exact calculation, but at $2 per tape, unless a tape holds 45 GB I can store more video in less physical space at lower cost on $ .20 data DVD’s.

Your thoughts appreciated.
ed


#7

Capture as DV-AVI via firewire (many capture programs can do this)… Or, capture as avi, with a program like huffyuv which does a lossless avi capture.

Store your tapes in a dry dark place, and they should last for many years. By the time they start to deteriorate, there will likely be a newer, better storage method available, and you can transfer them (as people are doing now, transferring vhs to dvd)… Also keep a copy on HD (an external HD), that way you have two backups… You can either save the HD one as avi, dv-avi, mpeg2, xvid…

As for storing on data dvd’s, nobody as of yet, can tell you the actual life of a data dvd, and it varies greatly from brand to brand. Even HD’s have a limited lifetime.

That is why I suggested keeping it on two different types of media. A few years down the road, upgrade your backups to whatever the new media at that time is…


#8

[QUOTE=~Jethro~;2074908][/COLOR]
I agree with everything, double for the highlighted part.
:iagree::iagree:[/QUOTE]

Jethro, I was just quoting what I have read on numerous sites… Here is an important tip from the professionals about buying Mini-DV tapes: Always buy the same brand of tape. Do NOT use TDK one day, Maxell the next day and then Sony the week after. Different manufacturers use different lubricants on the tape surface. If you mix and match tapes, you can gum up the camcorder recording heads, causing the camcorder to die

Do a google search for “mini-dv tape+use same brand”, and you will find tons of info concerning this.


#9

[QUOTE=harley2ride;2075350]Jethro, I was just quoting what I have read on numerous sites… Here is an important tip from the professionals about buying Mini-DV tapes: Always buy the same brand of tape. Do NOT use TDK one day, Maxell the next day and then Sony the week after. Different manufacturers use different lubricants on the tape surface. If you mix and match tapes, you can gum up the camcorder recording heads, causing the camcorder to die

Do a google search for “mini-dv tape+use same brand”, and you will find tons of info concerning this.[/QUOTE]

From my experience, 2 bad heads(380.00usd) 3hrs. repair time=sucks, since NOT using different brands in one camcorder, zero head damage. If I had to have someone else do the repairs, it would have been just as cheap to buy a new camcorder. Conclusion: save the headache do not reuse tapes, do not switch brands of tapes in same camcorder.


#10

The newer Cams all have hdds in them, I recently bought a new Cam with a 40gb hdd , it make things so much easier. LOL.:cool:


#11

[QUOTE=alan1476;2075546]The newer Cams all have hdds in them, I recently bought a new Cam with a 40gb hdd , it make things so much easier. LOL.:cool:[/QUOTE]

Easier to use, poorer quality output.


#12

[quote=~Jethro~;2075553]Easier to use, poorer quality output.[/quote] I get great HD output with my new Cam. It couldnt be better, those mini tapes are old technology, soon they will go the way of VHS.:cool:


#13

[QUOTE=alan1476;2075558]I get great HD output with my new Cam. It couldnt be better, those mini tapes are old technology, soon they will go the way of VHS.:cool:[/QUOTE]

Model?


#14

[B]Sony[/B] Handycam HDR-SR10.
The HDR-SR10 Handycam camcorder delivers everything you need to shoot Full HD 1920 x 1080 resolution video and 4 megapixel still images. You can record to an internal 40GB .


#15

Sorry Alan, yes this type of camcorders are great for consumers. Here is what I am using currently:JVC GR-HD1


#16

Hi Jethro, its a beauty but that came out in 2003, you need to upgrade buddy. Alot of advanced features came out since then, but from the looks of that baby, it sure looks professional to me.:iagree:


#17

My old Panasonic PVGS70 will do just fine, until Blu Ray burners and Media, come down in price. Then I will start looking at HD camcorders… :slight_smile:


#18

Thanks to everyone for your input, but I am still confused???
From Windows Movie Maker, choosing AVI results in 178 MB per minute of video. The next nearest choice is something like 14 MB / min. Do I really need to chew up over 10 GB on a HD to store an hour of lossless video?? And it seems like a big gap from 178 MB/min to 14 MB/min. Something does not jive.

And if Alan is getting good results onto a 4GB HDD what is the density for that file?? I don’t want to loose data but I don’t want to be overly conservative either.

thanks again for all the great help!
ed


#19

[quote=WarmB;2076309]Thanks to everyone for your input, but I am still confused???
From Windows Movie Maker, choosing AVI results in 178 MB per minute of video. The next nearest choice is something like 14 MB / min. Do I really need to chew up over 10 GB on a HD to store an hour of lossless video?? And it seems like a big gap from 178 MB/min to 14 MB/min. Something does not jive.

[B]And if Alan is getting good results onto a 4GB HDD[/B] what is the density for that file?? I don’t want to loose data but I don’t want to be overly conservative either.

thanks again for all the great help!
ed[/quote] Alan is getting greats results onto a [B]40gb hdd.:)[/B]


#20

[QUOTE=WarmB;2076309]Thanks to everyone for your input, but I am still confused???
From Windows Movie Maker, choosing AVI results in 178 MB per minute of video. The next nearest choice is something like 14 MB / min. Do I really need to chew up over 10 GB on a HD to store an hour of lossless video?? And it seems like a big gap from 178 MB/min to 14 MB/min. Something does not jive.

And if Alan is getting good results onto a 4GB HDD what is the density for that file?? I don’t want to loose data but I don’t want to be overly conservative either.

thanks again for all the great help!
ed[/QUOTE]

If you want lossless video, then you need to save it as avi or dv-avi, in it’s rawest form… Yes it takes up space. Hard drives are cheap… I believe that alans video is being saved as mpeg2, which is not quite as editable, and takes a hit when reverted to avi. Yes you can get good results editing mpeg2 video, but it still is not quite as good as working with avi…