Benefits of Increasing Power Supply for PC?

Last night I replaced my Desktop PCs power supply because I wanted to quiet things down - as I am building a music server, and the PC is in the same room as the stereo. The new power supply is no quieter than the old one. The new one does have considerably more power (500+ watts max compared to the older one’s 160 watt max). Is there any benefit of having additional power reserves?

Thank you.

If you are interested in reducing noise from your computer, you should look at this site: http://www.silentpcreview.com/ They have a wealth of information on the subject.

Power supplies shouldn’t be judged by wattage output alone. There are a lot of cheap psu’s with inflated ratings out there. Best to learn which companies are reliable, like Corsair, PC Power and Cooling, Seasonic, Fortron Source and most of the Antec and Enermax lines.

If you haven’t changed any other components, then adding more power probably won’t help or hurt anything. A newer psu from a company known for high quality may have less variation in the output than cheaper units. Having extra power might help if you plan on putting in a very high end video card, or lots of extra hard drives.

I have a Nspire Xtreme power 750 and it’s dead quiet, has a 140mm slow speed fan and I hear the CPU and Hard drives before I ever hear the PSU.
It’s also sold as a Pure power or something like that by cooler master or one of the big name company’s for a LOT more money.
It has stable rails, modular cables, and is over 80 percent efficient and all the other green/power saving stuff. I’ve run it over a year now with 4 HD’s 6 opticals, and a 3870x2 on a dual core AMD 4600 without a whimper yet, and I just went to a quad core Phenom still no problems.
Might be a great one for you if you need big quiet power on a budget. I paid 100 for it and you should be able to find it somewhere for close to that.

[QUOTE=Kerry56;2226458]If you are interested in reducing noise from your computer, you should look at this site: http://www.silentpcreview.com/ They have a wealth of information on the subject.

[B]Power supplies shouldn’t be judged by wattage output alone. There are a lot of cheap psu’s with inflated ratings out there. [/B]Best to learn which companies are reliable, like Corsair, PC Power and Cooling, Seasonic, Fortron Source and most of the Antec and Enermax lines.

If you haven’t changed any other components, then adding more power probably won’t help or hurt anything. A newer psu from a company known for high quality may have less variation in the output than cheaper units. Having extra power might help if you plan on putting in a very high end video card, or lots of extra hard drives.[/QUOTE]
Here’s a perfect example of questionable wattage ratings.

Here’s a [B]430W[/B] Thermaltake:

What we see is the that the important 12V output is a measly [B]18A[/B].

Now here’s a [B]300W[/B] HEC supply (HEC actually makes this Thermaltake):

http://www.hecgroupusa.com/product/89

Notice the similarity and again the [B]12V 18A output[/B]? A casual buyer looking to upgrade this correctly labeled 300W PS to a more powerful 400+W unit would be screwed if he bought the deceptively rated 430W Thermaltake.

Now here’s a 380W Antec:

Antec provides the info to figure out the 12V amps. 324W divided by12 = [B]27A[/B]. The 380W Antec provides 50% more amps at 12V than the [I]supposedly[/I] more powerful 430W Thermaltake.

That said the Earthwatts line are almost totally silent and energy efficient (I have 2).

This unit, now on sale is hard to beat and provides 30A @ 12V.

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16817371006

A computer setup uses as much power as it needs, having a PSU that has much more power than needed just sits there, its costs no more in power terms. But there is one good thing, as electronic components age they need more power to do the same job. The main cause of this are the capacitors. I use a 5 to 10% number (per year) for cap ageing, so its always a good idea to get a bigger PSU than needed, and you can add more to the box without fear of an overload.

In the last few years the humble PSU has become something that more people look into, IMO its one of the most important building blocks, a bad PSU can break anything and/or everything else. I have seen an overloaded PSU take out the motherboard, CPU, graphics card and some hard drives with it, but also just kill a few caps.

As said most people get caught up in the watts number, the amps are a better gauge to real power, I was taught to think of it in terms of a hose pipe. The watts are how wide it is and the amps are the amount of water flowing thru it. I used to work for Micro Dynamics where they made electronic ignition systems and I cant count the number of times I got a 150,000 watt jolt from the coils, I am still here because they are rated in milli amps, 240v/13amp mains can cause much more damage.

As for PSU’s I am a big Seasonic fan they make some of the very best you can get (and very quiet) and many other big names are made by them, including Corsair and PC Power and Cooling.

If you want to find out the truth about power supplies Jonny Guru’s site is a good place to start, and the extreme PSU Calculator for working out how much you need to use for a basic watts guide, you can then work out the amps you need on 12 volt line (most important) then 5 and 3.

As for PSU’s I am a big Seasonic fan they make some of the very best you can get (and very quiet)

The Antec Earthwatts I mentioned are made by Seasonic.

[QUOTE=MysticEyes;2227301]The Antec Earthwatts I mentioned are made by Seasonic.[/QUOTE]
I did not know that, thanks :flower:
I have always written off Antec as being …not bad …but the money could have been better spent elsewhere.

This list might be useful for identifiying the OEM of branded PSUs.

Remember though that PSUs made by a particular OEM but sold under different brands will not nesscesarily all be of the same quality. (IIRC) There was a case a few years ago of PSUs made by Seasonic for a particular brand having a very high failure rate because Seasonic’s customer had chosen to use poor quality capacitors.