Benefit of 2 drives?

I just bought a new HP computer ( phenom, 400 gb hdd ) and decided to back up some dvd’s. I have one dvd drive. I plan on buying dvdfab for ripping/burning.
Is there any benefit to buying another drive or should I just rip to HDD then burn to disc. Does over-writing all that data on the HDD cause any long term wear?
Thanks.

[QUOTE=chilipad;2019253]I just bought a new HP computer ( phenom, 400 gb hdd ) and decided to back up some dvd’s. I have one dvd drive. I plan on buying dvdfab for ripping/burning.
Is there any benefit to buying another drive [B]or should I just rip to HDD then burn to disc.[/B] Does over-writing all that data on the HDD cause any long term wear?
Thanks.[/QUOTE]
That’s basically the way it’s done. Once on the HD you decide where to go, shrink it, remove extras/menus/warnings etc. Then you burn. Get ImgBurn for that.

Just going from the optical drive to the hard drive, there is no need for two separate hdds. If you are reencoding the video to another format, then you will see a benefit in speed by using two different drives, one for input and the other for output.

Long term wear? I don’t believe it is a huge problem, though like anything else, the more you use a tool, the faster it wears down.

I don’t seem to wear out hard drives any faster than anyone else, and I do a lot of large file transfers and deletions.

Yo-

You say that you are going to buy DVD Fab (good move - I have had ‘Gold’ version for over a year and half and love it) - there is great benefit in being able to start the backup in a reading/ripping drive and burning to the other drive - as a set it and forget it solution-

Your HP probably came with a Samsung DVD/CD drive - which are usually very good readers/rippers-

I would suggest adding a Pioneer 115D (if other drive is PATA) or 215 (if other drive is SATA)-eh!!

There are a few benefits. Sometimes you’ll find that a particular drive will have issues reading a certain disc or burning to a certain type of media. Often this can be resolved by simply trying to read or burn on the other drive. Also, some drives are better readers and some better writers, and you’ll find that using a combination of two drives to read and write can give you higher quality and better efficiency. And, if your drive dies you already have another there and ready to crank out discs until you get the failed one replaced.

[QUOTE=ActionPoint;2019939]There are a few benefits. Sometimes you’ll find that a particular drive will have issues reading a certain disc or burning to a certain type of media. Often this can be resolved by simply trying to read or burn on the other drive. Also, some drives are better readers and some better writers, and you’ll find that using a combination of two drives to read and write can give you higher quality and better efficiency. And, if your drive dies you already have another there and ready to crank out discs until you get the failed one replaced.[/QUOTE]Welcome to CDF’s:

Good advice :iagree: I have had quite a few times i needed to read a disc with another drive. Usually my Samsung drives will cut through any disc. Hence me having 10 drives in this build. Easy access at my finger tips.