BD Burners not reading disks in WIN 7

vbimport

#1

Hi,

I have an LG WH12LS39 blu ray burner. Started having some issues with it reading disks about 2 weeks ago. Everytime I put a disk in it wont show up in explorer and spits the disk out saying I need to insert a disk?? I actually bought a new burner thinking it was an issue with the LG–I bought a new asus bw-12B1st installed it tonite and ran into the exact same issue–still wont read any disks.Looks like its a win7 issue. I uninstalled from the device manager and rebooted. Win7 indicated the drivers were successfully installed but again the drive will not read. Did a bios update as well and still nothing–ugh–if someone could point me in the right direction it would be greatly appreciated.

Thanks


#2

Have you tried deleting upper and lower filters?

And welcome to the forums yankee999.


#3

[QUOTE=Kerry56;2701626]Have you tried deleting upper and lower filters?

And welcome to the forums yankee999.[/QUOTE]

I saw a post on this earlier. --I’ll give it a shot.

Thanks for the rapid reply!!!


#4

[QUOTE=yankee999;2701628]I saw a post on this earlier. --I’ll give it a shot.

Thanks for the rapid reply!!![/QUOTE]

deleted the upper and lower registry entries as indicated–rebooted–still not reading disks–again uninstalled in device manager and rebooted–win 7 indicated a successful driver install–I can see the drive in explorer but still rejecting disks…


#5

Ok, lets try something outside of Windows to see if the SATA controllers and the port that you have it connected to are working properly.

To do that, you’ll need a bootable disc, like a live Linux cd, or a Windows installation disc, or something like the Ultimate Boot Disc. If you don’t already have one, you’d need a computer with a working dvd/cd burner.

The bios of the computer will have to be set to boot from the optical disc first, not the hard drive.

If the computer will boot up using one of those types of discs, you know the hardware is good.

If it isn’t convenient to try a bootable disc at the moment, you are down to a few other options, like looking for motherboard chipset drivers which usually contain the SATA controller drivers. Or trying another SATA port on the motherboard, or trying new cables.

Or you can go back to a restore point made before you started having issues.

Microsoft makes a Fix-it tool for optical drives, but the number of times this has actually worked is miniscule going by results here in our forums: http://support.microsoft.com/mats/cd_dvd_drive_problems


#6

[QUOTE=Kerry56;2701632]Ok, lets try something outside of Windows to see if the SATA controllers and the port that you have it connected to are working properly.

To do that, you’ll need a bootable disc, like a live Linux cd, or a Windows installation disc, or something like the Ultimate Boot Disc. If you don’t already have one, you’d need a computer with a working dvd/cd burner.

The bios of the computer will have to be set to boot from the optical disc first, not the hard drive.

If the computer will boot up using one of those types of discs, you know the hardware is good.

If it isn’t convenient to try a bootable disc at the moment, you are down to a few other options, like looking for motherboard chipset drivers which usually contain the SATA controller drivers. Or trying another SATA port on the motherboard, or trying new cables.

Or you can go back to a restore point made before you started having issues.

Microsoft makes a Fix-it tool for optical drives, but the number of times this has actually worked is miniscule going by results here in our forums: http://support.microsoft.com/mats/cd_dvd_drive_problems[/QUOTE]

changed the first boot disk to cd rom in bios-- used WIN7 install disk–booted up with no problems –


#7

Then your hardware is good.

You are down to a few options, the first of which is to go back to a restore point made prior to the start of your problems.
Reinstalling motherboard chipset drivers is another step to try.

The last resort is a repair installation of Windows. Save all important data on an external hard drive if possible before doing this. http://www.pcworld.com/article/243190/how_to_repair_a_corrupt_windows_7_installation.html

Once you have everything working well, I’d strongly advise you to start making backup images of your operating system hard drive. http://www.howtogeek.com/howto/4241/how-to-create-a-system-image-in-windows-7/


#8

[QUOTE=Kerry56;2701677]Then your hardware is good.

You are down to a few options, the first of which is to go back to a restore point made prior to the start of your problems.
Reinstalling motherboard chipset drivers is another step to try.

The last resort is a repair installation of Windows. Save all important data on an external hard drive if possible before doing this. http://www.pcworld.com/article/243190/how_to_repair_a_corrupt_windows_7_installation.html

Once you have everything working well, I’d strongly advise you to start making backup images of your operating system hard drive. http://www.howtogeek.com/howto/4241/how-to-create-a-system-image-in-windows-7/[/QUOTE]
ok–downloaded and reinstalled chipset drivers–no go–stupid question on the windows repair–says it needs the install media–how do I run if it wont read the disk in the drive?


#9

It is possible to use a usb drive for the repair, or in this case, Upgrade option for Win 7. You would need to transfer the contents of your installation disc onto a usb flash drive or download a Win 7 ISO file from Digitalriver. If you download one, make sure to get one that matches your current version, as you will have to use your key with the ISO. Microsoft released a tool for putting the ISO on a usb drive. Maybe this guide will help: http://pcsupport.about.com/od/windows7/a/install-windows-7-usb.htm

The only thing you can do with this computer and your optical drive is a complete clean install from your disc, since you would have to boot from it.