Bad Quality

vbimport

#1

What determines bad quality?

The following movies came out with bad quality:

The Shining, The Exorcist, Jaws, Interview With The Vampire, etc.

At first I thought it might be length (all these movies are 2+ hours), but “Pulp Fiction” (also 2+ hours) came out great.


#2

Its not really the length of the movie that determines result - allthough it can be a guideline that this might be a difficult movie.

Its the size of the original movievobs, the average bitrate of the original movie, the quality of the original movie and how difficult/complex the content of the original movie is.

Result is determined by how much the transcodingengine has to lower the bitrate to make the vobs small enough to fit on a 4.7 gb dvd-r.

Quality of the original movie is also very important as the transcodingengine use the same encodingscheme as the original, only lowers the bitrate. Most of the titles you mention are older movies and quality of those are bound to be less than some of the new movies.


#3

dvd2one does not transcode. it is simply compression algorythms that make the vobs smaller. transcoding is a whole different process

http://club.cdfreaks.com/showthread.php?s=&threadid=69019

check out reneb’s explanation.


#4

makes no difference if you call it transcoding or a simple compression algorythm - the resulting quality still depends on the above mentioned parameters and not so much if the movie is 1.30 hour or 2 hour long. Compressing a 2 hour movie in original good quality encoding will yield better results than compressing a 1.30 movie in original poor quality encoding.


#5

The movies I listed (although old) are all newly remastered and feature very good quality. So, i’m a still a bit confused as to why they came out so bad.


#6

Originally posted by dvr105
makes no difference if you call it transcoding or a simple compression algorythm - the resulting quality still depends on the above mentioned parameters and not so much if the movie is 1.30 hour or 2 hour long. Compressing a 2 hour movie in original good quality encoding will yield better results than compressing a 1.30 movie in original poor quality encoding.

Indeed you’re always 100% realiable on the source material. Some 3 hours are done with a beter compression engine then some 1.5 hours i’ve seen.

Some how some studios still use a very ancient encoder which always gave bad results.

Some studios use a very good encoder which even gives a good result on lower bitrate (for example Sony)


#7

Interesting, Rene

I didn’t know that. I thought these guys worked with bleeding edge stuff - money no object, you know.

Do you want to name names or give some examples?

-Pete


#8

Is there a “Master List” of which movies have good and bad quality? If not, we should make one.

I’d be curious to see if anyone had better luck with the movies I listed.


#9

Originally posted by fem1031
I’d be curious to see if anyone had better luck with the movies I listed.

I did a backup copy of Jaws and the quality was very good on my Panasonic standalone & Philips 42 inch widescreen T.V.
Members of my family have also watched this copy on their standalones and agree that it was an excelent picture.
I’m not sure what you mean by “bad quality” is it a grainy picture? or colour distortion? or are you getting up close to the screen and then comparing notes with the original copy?
I have made lots and lots of backups now with dvd2one and never had a bad result yet… I had one or two dark scenes go misty for a few seconds but even then I would not describe this as “bad quality” I guess we all have our opinions on quality issues but in my opinion quality is in the eye of the beholder.


#10

By bad quality I mean artifacts, like a VCD.


#11

Yes I have seen VCD’s and SVCD’s and they are bad quality but ALL of the copy’s I have done on DVD-R with dvd2one have been far superior to those including the copy of Jaws


#12

DUH…

Comparing DVD’s to VCD is like comparing a trabant with a ferarri. Both cars with 4 wheels but very different…


#13

The quality of the output image will also depend on the aspect ratio of the original input image.

With a full 16:9 (1.77:1) image every single pixel will have to be encoded because there’s more image information on the screen.

However, with a 2.35:1 image there are less image pixels to encode because there’s less image information on the screen.

Larger black bars = smaller input image = better looking output image!