Backing up HD or Superbit titles without loss of quality

Long time no see, but was wondering if there is any program (or are they all pretty much the same) that is better at retaining the exact or close to quality of the Superbit and HD transfers of DVD movies.

For example the reference DVD The Fifth Element is an extremely popular one that most DVD people look at making a backup copy of.

The backup will be made to a DL DVD as opposed to two DVD

Use DVD Decrypter. It can create a ISO image of a dual layer DVD then write it to a dual layer blank.

http://www.dvddecrypter.com/ .

so are most movies requiring a dual layer disc to backup on one disc? i was thinking so, that if a movie is on a dual layer disc, there would be no way to burn it to a DVD-R or +R without compressing and losing quality

You are correct.

A regular DVD-R or DVD+R is single layer. It can hold only (approximately) one-half of what a dual layer disc can hold. So, if you are dealing with an original source disc which used a dual layer disc, you simply have way too much data for your blank DVD-R or DVD+R.

And, most of the newer releases today are using dual layer discs when they are pressed at the factory. Not all, but a lot of them, especially the mainstream recent Hollywood releases.

When that is the case, your choices, then, are as follows:

-you can compress, and you will always lose quality, of course. How much depends on many factors (how much data is there; how much data was used for the main movie as opposed to extras; are there extra soundtracks like DTS; etc.) This compression means a quality loss in the picture. This is acceptable to some – but then some people watch their DVDs on a tiny 13 inch screen, while others are using a ceiling-hung front CRT projector or LCD projector, and viewing the picture on a huge 106-inch screen. I prefer no loss of quality, which means no compression, so I choose one of the next options

-choice 2, you can use dual layer blanks for these backups. These discs will generally hold everything that was on the original, and you can make a “perfect” bit-for- bit backup. Your backup will be identical the original in every way, except it will have no copy protection and can usually be “Region Free.” The downside is the cost of the blank media, which is still very exorbitant. It is getting better, but most are avoiding the $5 to $10 per disc.

-choice 3, you can “split” things and use two blank DVD-Rs or two DVD+Rs. This is my personal choice, but I am in the minority here. If you choise to split the material to 2 discs, you can then choose how to split it… whether you want to retain menus, for example – if so, it will be a bit more time-consuming (and usually requires one extra piece of software).

-choice 4 is probably the most popular around here. It involves some combination or hybrid of choices 1, 2 and 3 above. For example, some people try to compress “just a little,” and get the entire movie on one disc, so they do not have to swap in mid-movie. Then, they can store all of the extras on the second disc. In some cases, this technique can even be done using NO COMPRESSION for the main movie, and then using any required compression on the second disc, since it has only extras.

Dual layer discs were invented to allow more storage room on the disc. Obviously, if you decide to use single-layer discs, some compromise must be made, in some area. You must decide what is best for you. (Do you mind swapping discs in mid-movie? Do you mind paying very high costs for blank dual layer discs? Do you care at all about extras? How important are menus to you? How important is the time factor when you are backing up a disc? How important is picture quality to you now, and might this change with your next TV purchase?)

-Bruce

nice post BSpielbauer…

like you, i usually choose to split the full uncompressed disc to 2 single layer +Rs.

here’s a good piece of software (free) and guide on how to do it:
http://www.mrbass.org/dvdfab/

thanks for the info, i have done some research myself, my first backup was made using a single DVD-R disc, tried the dvd shrink/dvd decrypter method, but one of those programs is buggy and was causing errors and system hangups, then i got the “good” version of dvdxcopy platinum and just used the express module, insert source disc, hit big green go button, about 15 minutes later it opens the drive and asks for a blank dvd disc, hit big green go button again, about 5 mins later out pops a full disc backup, mv free, region free, doesn’t get any easier than that

i was skeptical about the IQ effect of compression, so i stuck it in my toshiba sd-5980 upconverting dvd player, set to 720P outpput via hdmi into my toshiba 46h84 46" ws hdtv rptv, and neither my wife nor i noticed any IQ loss, no artifacts, no macroblocking, etc…so until they release dual layer dvd’s for my light scribe dvd writer, i think i will stick with this, switching discs mid movie is not an option for me, and i dont mind the cost of the dl media, not like i am mass producing, but as far as i can tell, my dvd player may not play recorded dl discs, although it seems that if it will play a pressed dl disc, a burned dl disc should work fine too, haven’t tested it yet