Back up lots of photos and videos

vbimport

#1

I heard hard discs don’t last as long as DVDs, so I wanna back up my kids videos and photos to discs. There are M-Discs (a bit more expensive than regular DVDs) claimed to last 1000 years, has anyone here tried them? :wink:


#2

I don’t consider HDs or SSDs to be more than temporary storage, like for working copies. For data archiving as you require, I prefer optical media such as DVDs. There are lots of strategies for maximizing DVD longevity to be found elsewhere in this forum.

Mdisk is taking awhile to get off the ground and might never become commonplace. I hope it does because it uses an inorganic data layer vs. DVDs which use less resilient organic dyes. That’s why Mdisks are claimed to last virtually forever.

But recently I learned some Blu-Ray disks use a metallic data layer. I believe they’re known as High-to-Low or HTL. These should offer long term archiving similar to Mdisks. The problem is they’re hard to find, but at least they’re proven and should cost less than Mdisks.

http://blog.digistor.com/not-all-blu-ray-discs-are-created-equal-but-does-bd-r-quality-matter/

BD HTL is what I intend to migrate to upon building a new PC.


#3

HTL Blu-ray are commonplace. They are what we would think of as the “normal” version of recordable Blu-ray, and they do use an inorganic recording layer.

The LTH versions, sold primarily by Verbatim and Taiyo Yuden, use organic dyes like most burnable DVD’s.

Verbatim also sells HTL, and I would recommend them for most uses. For long term storage, you might want to find some Panasonic discs, though they are getting hard to find in the US. FTI/Falcon HTL discs are also recommended, and can be found at MediaMegaMall in the US.


#4

I use MDISC exclusively for precious data and the last time I bought the BD-R 25GB discs they cost $4.40 each. I would not trust any other product and in any case wouldn’t base my decision on price, when it comes to irreplaceable content.

Yes I bought an LG BD-MDISC writer specifically for this purpose.

I’ve had other writeable discs fail after only a couple of years–I don’t trust them any more, though I will use them for other purposes e.g. recordings of TV shows and backups of DVDs etc which I can always re-buy if necessary.


#5

They’re not commonplace here. North of the border, HTL cannot be found at any retailer that I’ve searched, B&M or online. If you know of any, please share for the benefit of those of us who do not reside in America.

[QUOTE=Kerry56;2752419]HTL Blu-ray are commonplace. They are what we would think of as the “normal” version of recordable Blu-ray, and they do use an inorganic recording layer…[/QUOTE]


#6

Best Buy Canada

Tiger Direct Canada

BlankMedia Canada

NCIX Canada

Newegg Canada

This is just a cursory list obtained through Google for blank HTL discs available in Canadian shops. And the listed items are not the only choices, just ones I would recommend without qualms.


#7

It doesn’t really matter what format one uses for critical backups. What does matter is that one uses a smart backup management scheme that includes multiple copies in different locations and different formats, and [I]regular integrity checks[/I]. Online cloud storage is also a good added level of backup. Dirt cheap optical discs are fine as long as you verify or replace them regularly and also have additional levels of backup. You’re not really backing anything up unless you have at least 3-4 different copies.


#8

[QUOTE=CDan;2752464]It doesn’t really matter what format one uses for critical backups. What does matter is that one uses a smart backup management scheme that includes multiple copies in different locations and different formats, and [I]regular integrity checks[/I]. Online cloud storage is also a good added level of backup. Dirt cheap optical discs are fine as long as you verify or replace them regularly and also have additional levels of backup. You’re not really backing anything up unless you have at least 3-4 different copies.[/QUOTE]

:iagree::iagree::iagree:


#9

These are what I’ve seen but none actually say they’re HTL rather than LTH. :confused:

[QUOTE=Kerry56;2752441]Best Buy Canada

Tiger Direct Canada

BlankMedia Canada

NCIX Canada

Newegg Canada

This is just a cursory list obtained through Google for blank HTL discs available in Canadian shops. And the listed items are not the only choices, just ones I would recommend without qualms.[/QUOTE]


#10

[QUOTE=symphonic100;2752476]These are what I’ve seen but none actually say they’re HTL rather than LTH. :confused:[/QUOTE]

Unless the label specifically says LTH, you are going to get HTL. That’s why I said it is very common.

With Verbatim retail discs, look for the designation MABL on the label. These are HTL discs.

Panasonic doesn’t sell LTH.


#11

Thanks.

[QUOTE=Kerry56;2752479]Unless the label specifically says LTH, you are going to get HTL. That’s why I said it is very common.

With Verbatim retail discs, look for the designation MABL on the label. These are HTL discs.

Panasonic doesn’t sell LTH.[/QUOTE]


#12

[QUOTE=CDan;2752464]…[I]integrity checks. Online cloud storage is also a good added level of backup. Dirt cheap optical discs are fine as long as you verify[/I]…[/QUOTE]

Is there any basic software you recommend for verifying integrity?


#13

I use the M-Disc BD-R to back up 100+ GB of videos. My photos and videos used up all my Cloud space, so I burn them on to M-Disc BD-Rs.


#14

Just started a testing of M-disc BD-R (RiTek), I will leave it under sunlight 24-7, then check after couple weeks to see if they still alive.


#15

[QUOTE=MAC-11;2753412]Just started a testing of M-disc BD-R (RiTek), I will leave it under sunlight 24-7, then check after couple weeks to see if they still alive.[/QUOTE]

Looking forward to your testing result.
By the way, will you be testing with sunlight exposure only?


#16

[QUOTE=hp0418;2753937]Looking forward to your testing result.
By the way, will you be testing with sunlight exposure only?[/QUOTE]

I burn these test M-disc BD-R by LG WH16NS40.
The M-disc BD-R’s specification almost the same as BD-R, except the speed only 2x.
I also tried one on a Pioneer BDR-208, it shows 4x but the real speed still 2x.
Burning software is ImgBurn v2.5.8.0 with pre-build image file for 23GB.

However, my Liteon iHAS324 with DVDInfo Pro seems has some problem to check the M-disc BD-R quality.
It will take very very long time to read the whole disc, maybe 30 hours or more, so I will use Opti Drive Control instead.


#17

This is all about Disk, Is there a problem with long term Flash Drives? I thought they were better. I understood that the DVD, BD and CD were on their way out. It is getting harder and harder to find a laptop with a drive in it. Just like you don’t find a desktop (unless you build it) with the old 51/4 or 31/2" drive any more. Honest question

Marty


#18

[QUOTE=thor21344;2754026]This is all about Disk, Is there a problem with long term Flash Drives? I thought they were better. I understood that the DVD, BD and CD were on their way out. It is getting harder and harder to find a laptop with a drive in it. Just like you don’t find a desktop (unless you build it) with the old 51/4 or 31/2" drive any more. Honest question

Marty[/QUOTE]

Flash drives are much more expensive per GB than optical. I can get 50x25GB INFOME-R40 for £12. What size flash can I get for £12? Maybe 32GB ? Big difference.

And for long-term storage I think they are probably no better than optical. I’ve heard it said that with flash memory [I]"you are not really storing your data, you are storing a probabilistic approximation of your data. "[/I]


#19

ok thanks


#21

bunnybaby, depends on what you are backing up.

I would say the best media is DVD-R or CD-R and then archival grade, or for CD’s you want gold discs. Yes, they do cost a lot more but the data is safe for a long time, if you store the media in the right way. At least it will not degrade over time as standard media will.

So saving photos and such on gold CD-R, and video plus photos on archival DVD-R is the best option. Do multiple copies, oh and saving copies on standard harddrives good to. Forget flash media and such, will not do.

The worst part is saving video, takes up so much space. I find that only saving the most valued or important stuff is best, this way you keep the information to a minimum. Keep the stuff you have little value for, but still want to save on regular harddrives (that are in a cabinet offline).

Fun fact:

A few years ago I dumped some old harddrives, real old, they where only the size of 120Mb or something, from the early 90s but guess what, they booted up and the information on them where readable.

As someone else pointed out, backup and storage is one thing, maintaining backups or archive is another !