Audio signal (through VCR) & video signal (direct to TV) out of sync

After my move I had to reconnect AV receiver (Marantz SR-5000 OSE) and DVD player (Denon DVD-1710). Before the move it worked like a charm, now I have some syncing problems, but the hardware has not changed (except for the TV).

Setup is as follows:

  • DVD is connected to AV receiver by optical cable
  • DVD is connected to TV (Philips 42PFL9903) directly by S-VHS cable
  • DVD is also connected to AV Receiver with red/white plugs (analog)

When I play a DVD (original, tried several) the sound and video are not in sync. Video signal appears to be delayed by half a second.

I tried to connect the DVD player with a Coaxial cable, same result.

I tried to search other forums, but the number of results on ‘how to connect’ and ‘out of sync’ was too much for me to go through. Appear to have lost original manual, but the manual of a newer model (SR 5003) did not help much.

I hope someone over here has an idea what to do. Could it help when I buy an extra S-VHS cable and connect DVD player to AV Receiver with S-VHS and then AV-Receiver to TV with S-VHS too?

Many thanks for your suggestions

Was the old TV an analog set? If you connect the DVD player analog audio to the TV, are they in sync? My guess is the TV has a delay because it has to digitize the S-VHS signal.

[QUOTE=olyteddy;2414310]Was the old TV an analog set? If you connect the DVD player analog audio to the TV, are they in sync? My guess is the TV has a delay because it has to digitize the S-VHS signal.[/QUOTE] My guess is also that the new TV delays the video signal, but it’s probably the image processing and not the A/D conversion that is responsible for most of the delay.

I’m assuming there is no way to connect your (older) DVD player by HDMI to the TV?

Can you connect the digital audio output from the DVD player to the TV and connect digital audio output from the TV to your receiver?

Thanks for the responses.
The previous TV was an older one, CRT model (not LCD)…could that be the cause?

DVD player does not have HDMI unfortunately…If that is the solution, I better buy myself a new DVD player, one that has HDMI

[QUOTE=Da_Taxman;2414391]The previous TV was an older one, CRT model (not LCD)…could that be the cause?[/QUOTE]Old CRT televisions don’t have all the signal processing of a modern LCD (or plasma, I guess) television, and therefore not the same delay in the signal path.

DVD player does not have HDMI unfortunately…If that is the solution, I better buy myself a new DVD player, one that has HDMI
HDMI is not the solution as such; connecting the TV audio output to your AV receiver instead of connecting your DVD audio output to your AV receiver is a solution, since the TV will synch up the audio and video.

Using HDMI is one way of getting both audio and video to your TV in digital format. An upscaling DVD player may also give you a better image - at least so I’ve been told (my eyes don’t really notice the difference).

Unless your TV has audio output that can be connected to your AV receiver, this will not help with the synching problem. Digital output is best.

Thanks.
My TV does have audio out, but that is analog and I think it would be a waste, considering I have a DTS capable set.

There must be a way to use both digital audio as well as digital picture, without the delay.

And I hope the solution is not buying a HDMI capable AV receiver as well as a HDMI capable DVD player…that would be a costly solution (especially considering my taste :wink: )

Do you have any way of controlling delay in either your DVD player or your AV receiver?

EDIT: According to the official specifications, your television does in fact have digital audio output (coaxial S/PDIF).

If your AV receiver has digital audio input (coaxial a.k.a. S/PDIF), then try connecting DVD analog audio out to your television and connecting your television digital audio out to your AV receiver. That should fix the synching problem, unless your AV receiver introduces noticeable audio delay.

If that works, you can consider buying a new upscaling DVD player and connect it with HDMI for best audio and video quality.

Well, iirc, sound travels about 1100 feet per second…Could you move the speakers 550 feet away? :confused:

seriously though, I know analog audio delays are readily available but haven’t heard of a ‘digital audio’ delay.

Well I’ll be GTH…Google ‘digital audio delay’…there actually are such devices!

You may also want to consider hooking up your current DVD player to your television with a SCART cable, since your DVD player supports RGB thru SCART, which should beat the quality of your current S-VHS hookup and also connect analog audio at the same time.

The AV receiver allows 15ms audio delay, but I notice no difference…so could be that it only applies to analog audio as olyteddy mentions…

hmmm, I could try the coaxial audio out from TV to AV receiver and analog sound from DVD player to TV… Although that will still result in losing digital audio signal, it will test the audio delay…

Perhaps the best option here may be a new DVD player with HDMI, connect it to TV with HDMI and connect audio out from TV to AV receiver with coax…that should allow both digital picture and digital audio…and that will only set me back a few hundred euros (don’t think I will switch to blu-ray just yet, unless they can do DVD upscaling too)

again, thanks for the help and patience…

Bought a new DVD Player, one that has HDMI. Connected DVD player to DVD through HDMI. TV now has picture and sound that is in sync. The TV is connected by analog cables to the receiver and even through when sound comes through receiver, the video and audio are in sync…

So all I have to do now is buy a 3m coax cable for digital audio and I should be all set…

Total solution set me back a few hundred euros, but not as much as buying a complete new stereo :wink:

Thanks again for your help!

Glad you’ve managed to get a solution you’re happy with! :slight_smile:

[QUOTE=Da_Taxman;2417728]So all I have to do now is buy a 3m coax cable for digital audio and I should be all set…[/QUOTE] A 3m phono cable of good quality meant for audio can also be used - the important thing is the cable should have good shielding. So if you have a spare 3m analog stereo cable with phono plugs available, and the cable is solid (usually means good shielding), you can use the left or right part of that cable to connect to your A/V receiver.

I’ve been using such cables for some of my coaxial S/PDIF connections for years, after a knowledgeable guy in a Hi-Fi shop told me and showed me that a cable meant for analog connection could be used instead of the more costly specialized cables.