Audio Problems

vbimport

#1

Hi, this is my first time on this site. I am self taught when it comes to editing and i’m sure i’m making dumb mistakes. I need some serious help. I have audio problems with every dvd i burn from my pc! I’m editing on premiere pro 2.0. As i’m editing I watch my audio levels making sure i’m out of the red zone so there’s no distortion. Once finished burning I check the burned dvd in a standalone dvd player and it sounds really loud-yet when i go to present it to my client and they try to show it to an audience it’s barely audible. (my clients are playing the dvd on an apple computer, connecting the laptop to a projector and using external speakers). What am i doing wrong? Are my codec settings in premiere pro off? I’m not editing in surround sound. My audio source comes from a stereo boom mic. HELP ME PLEASE:sad::sad::sad:


#2

If the dvd has correct volume on a stand alone dvd player as you say, then it seems to me the problem lies somewhere in the playback from the Apple laptop–>Projector—>external speakers. Do they have problems with volume using commercially made dvds in that setup?

Which type of audio are you using for the dvds? AC3? PCM, MP2?


#3

They don’t have problems with any dvd’s, just mine. I had one guy even plug in an external corded mike to make sure it wasn’t their speakers and the mic had perfect volume. I don’t tweak any audio settings on premiere pro 2.0, it just says 16bit stereo, 48khz. i can’t figure out why this keeps happening. I’m using Sony DVD-R blank dvd’s and burning on Sony DVDRW DRU-830A.


#4

How does your DVD sound on your own computer? Have you tried it on another laptop? have you tried it on a normal DVD player?

I don´t think the media or your burning configuration has anything to do with this problem.


#5

DVD sounds alot lower on my laptop but at least i can hear it. On a standalone dvd player it sounds very loud. I’m noticing the volume problem when the DVD is connected via computer-projector-external speakers. This is becoming a really big problem for me as many of my clients are schools and they want to play the DVD’s for school assembly programs & special events.

Also, i have noticed when my clients put the DVD into an apple laptop the DVD sounds even lower than on my pc. I am at my wit’s end because no matter how many times i test the DVD at home before showcasing it to a client i never know if they’ll be able to hear it when they need to use it for an assembly program.

An example: Yesterday i burned a DVD for a client, tested it on a standalone dvd player it played so loud it actually sounded distorted so i went back to premiere pro lowered the volume, rechecked it- it still sounded loud but not distorted. Well can u believe i had to host a live assembly program featuring my dvd and less than half the audience was able to hear it. The client even had to hold a mic to the external speaker and it was still barely audible! I was so embarassed. I am desperately trying to figure this out. Help me please.:sad::sad::sad::sad::sad::sad:


#6

What player are you using on the computers? Are you using a commercial program like PowerDVD or WinDVD?

VLC works on both OSX and Windows, so you might test with it. www.videolan.org

I’m still interested in the actual audio codec you are using in the dvds. If you are in the US, using NTSC standards, you are probably using AC3 compressed format…or possibly PCM. Open the dvd with Gspot Video Utility or MediaInfo (both free to download and use). They will show which audio type you have. There should be adequate support for both those types in any dvd player…just trying to find something to change in your output and have you test it for differences in volume.


#7

Does your client use self powered external speakers?
Some laptops have really low output. It happened to me with IBM machine. DVD played normal, but when played on laptop with volume all the way up, you could hardly hear it.


#8

[QUOTE=CDuncle;2178224]Does your client use self powered external speakers?
Some laptops have really low output. It happened to me with IBM machine. DVD played normal, but when played on laptop with volume all the way up, you could hardly hear it.[/QUOTE]

Had same problem with HP Laptop from work.
DVD played fine in stand alone and in box computer but could hardly hear it in the HP Laptop.


#9

Thanks so much for trying to help out- all of you. :smiley: I am desperate to get to the bottom of this.

Thanks for the utility download suggestion, it helped. It looks like i’m using PCM. What’s VLC? Any suggestions on what codecs to start testing with?

My pc laptop plays back with Real Media, i don’t know what the schools use to play back on the apple laptops- whatever they’re using i’m sure it’s pretty basic.

I have had clients use both types of speakers. Self powered and connected to an audio system. I’ve noticed when speakers are connected to an audio system it’s even worse. My husband thinks it has something to do with not editing in 5.1 surround sound. Any thoughts on this? :confused:


#10

I start from bottom
5.1 is not a problem. All laptops have only two speakers and head phone jack. Those are stereo. Unless you have software player which will simulate 5.1 into stereo speakers, it make no difference.
Self powered speakers should work, because they have their own amplifier with a volume control. That is how I solved my problem.
Mind you, if speakers do not have sufficient wattage, it may not be enough to play in a classroom setting.

Audio system, not sure about, because it depend where you plug your computer in. It could be a result of impedance mismatch.

PCM is an audio type similar to WAV.
VLC is a software player (free download). It play all kind of video formats.


#11

Thanks! Then where do you think the problem lies? Is it the codec settings?

I don’t get it. How can the audio output on my dvd sound so different from what i hear during editing? When i play it on a standalone dvd player connected to a regular tv the dvd sounds mad loud- just like what i hear during editing. Then if i play the dvd on my pc laptop (no external speakers attached) it sounds low (about half the volume maybe less). When the schools go to play the dvd during an assembly they run it from an apple laptop-projector-external speakers (either stand alone speakers or thru a system) the dvd sounds even lower. This last assembly it was barely audible! Mind you before i took it to the school i tested it once again on my standalone dvd player and it sounded so loud it was almost distorted.

There has to be a way for me to accurately determine my audio level output and make sure my DVD can be heard before a live audience. I feel helpless bringing in DVD’s - hoping they can be heard. :sad::sad:


#12

I am afraid there is not much you can do. It definitely is not a codec.
That would have to do with audio not playing at all on your computer.
If it play find on Stand alone, there is nothing wrong with DVD. Only suggestion I have is to take the standalone to the school and play it through that.
Unless it is a presentation, in which case it may be a bit hard.

I would say the problem is in their hook up.

One think is to take some commercial DVD and try to play it there, if they allow.
You cannot have an audience, because that becomes illegal. But you should be able to do some testing like that.

One more think is to try to get speakers for your laptop and use that at presentation, using their projector for a video.


#13

I’ll try that. I just called one of the schools i work with and i’ll be able to come in and test their setup with a commcl dvd and also with one of my own dvd’s. i’ll let you know how it goes. thanks again!:bigsmile::bigsmile:


#14

Good


#15

You’re right! :bow::bow::bow:

There definitely wasn’t anything wrong with the DVD. I brought along several DVD’s to test (not at the same location, at a different school, but they all use the same laptops & projectors, but vary with the type of speakers they use), anyway, I tested the dvd through their laptop-projector-external standalone speakers and it was VERY LOUD. I also tested the DVD that sounded distorted at home & it also sounded distorted there. Whew! At least i know i’m getting accurate readings when editing.:smiley:

I spoke to a staff member at the school & told her what happened. She mentioned that the particular school I did the assembly at has a huge auditorium and that might have contributed to how low it sounded- maybe the speakers weren’t appropriate for that large a space?

I have another assembly this Monday and my contact there will be letting me have access to the equipment one hour prior to test in a larger area. After the holidays I am going to try to get back to the school that i had the problem with and see if i can tinker directly with their system.

THANK YOU SO MUCH FOR YOU SUGGESTIONS! At least i have some answers now. :D:D

Oh, in regards to bringing in my own laptop & speakers for the assemblies do u have any recommendations for good external speakers?


#16

Glad it works for You. :clap:

There is lots of speakers around, but it all depend on the room size.
I would say anything with 20W+ should do, but since you know the problem, it may be easier to use their equipment and set it up right.
They should heave a system which is powerful enough for their requirement.
As for distortion. If DVD play OK on stand alone, than it is just a case of trying to put too much power(volume)to the speakers and they cannot handle it, or you are plugging into an input for low level signal, do not use Mic input, should be LineIn.
Good luck in your endeavor.


#17

change your audio output to AC3. It will work with more equipment, than the pcm audio.


#18

No argument here, but I think OP is talking about audio loudness from speakers (analogue audio signal), not a type.


#19

Can premiere pro output to AC3? if so, where would i do it? :confused:

[QUOTE=harley2ride;2179777]change your audio output to AC3. It will work with more equipment, than the pcm audio.[/QUOTE]


#20

In your options or preferences you will have settings to select for your video and audio output options.

I know that volume should not be an issue with pcm vs ac3, but it will be an issue in various players. I tried pcm audio a few times, and I could not get hardly any sound at all on my onkyo dvd player. I switched to ac3 and didn’t have any problems at all.

Also, make sure that you check your sound card (advanced) options, and make sure that your audio in and audio out levels are just above mid level… Make sure that nothing is muted…