AT&T obtains patent to detect and ban file sharers

vbimport

#1

We’ve just posted the following news: AT&T obtains patent to detect and ban file sharers[newsimage]http://static.myce.com//images_posts/2013/07/ATT-Logo-Thumbnail.png[/newsimage]

American internet provider AT&T has obtained a patent on technology to recognize and rate filesharers on a network. Using the technology it should be easy to block notorious pirates from the internet.

            Read the full article here: [http://www.myce.com/news/69886-69886/](http://www.myce.com/news/69886-69886/)

            Please note that the reactions from the complete site will be synched below.

#2

This isn’t new. A couple years ago, my son had nine PC games that he either lost or damaged the discs for, so he found and downloaded all nine from the Internet. Some time later, I got a letter from Qwest (now CenturyLink) listing the nine games and where they were downloaded from , and I had to explain to them the circumstances of the downloads, or face having my internet service discontinued.


#3

“THX 1138 4EB! THX 1138 4EB! This is authority! You will stop where you are!”

Everyone should have a right to access the internet without the assumption that just because they can break the law, doesn’t mean they will. I have some knives in my kitchen, as most people do. Does that make me a murderer? [b]ABSOLUTELY NOT!!![/B]

Seriously, someone needs to hold AT&T for accountable for the information they pirate from their own customers. Why should we be called pirates, when they are the ones attacking us! Just because some people are pirates, doesn’t mean everyone is.

If MacDonald’s were to treat their customers half as bad (“You’re eyes are too close together, therefore we can’t trust you and refuse to serve you”), these customers would disappear in a matter of weeks. Yet for reasons I couldn’t possibly understand, users are completely oblivious when it comes to tech giants mistreating them.

If you ask me, they should change their name to “TTT” (Treacherous, Totalitarian Telecommunications). IMHO, there’s nothing “American” about making people pay good money to have their constitutional rights to privacy violated on a large scale. I’ll bet Randall Stephenson wouldn’t want us spying on him!

As soon as my own contract with TTT expires, I’ll be dumping them for good!


#4

Losing paying customers will not be good for AT&T’s profits. Again, multiply this by thousands and you will begin to see the inherent conflict of interest. AT&T is NOT a media holdings company. It is a telecom and they make their money selling access. Notice how much they look the other way when the “DATA” being pedaled is sold on a cellular data network @ $10 a gigabyte…


#5

Close any account you have with AT&T, do not support the real pirates of the telecoms.
AT&T have always hated their customers, check your bills there are errors on every single one of them.


#6

[QUOTE=BradWright;2713376]This isn’t new. A couple years ago, my son had nine PC games that he either lost or damaged the discs for, so he found and downloaded all nine from the Internet. Some time later, I got a letter from Qwest (now CenturyLink) listing the nine games and where they were downloaded from , and I had to explain to them the circumstances of the downloads, or face having my internet service discontinued.[/QUOTE]

Interesting. I have had Qwest (and Centurylink) since 2009. I haven’t heard of this happening before as they usually have a don’t ask, don’t tell policy.


#7

[QUOTE=tmc8080;2713514]Losing paying customers will not be good for AT&T’s profits. Again, multiply this by thousands and you will begin to see the inherent conflict of interest. AT&T is NOT a media holdings company. It is a telecom and they make their money selling access. Notice how much they look the other way when the “DATA” being pedaled is sold on a cellular data network @ $10 a gigabyte…[/QUOTE]

One of these days the cable companies will finally figure it out. What’s the point of having a 50Mb+ connection to just browse the internet and watch the occasional video clip. They can’t have it both ways. They want people to pay the extra money for speed but to only consume the bare minimum of bandwidth. With all the limitations and restrictions on some of these high speed connections (ie bandwidth throttling, cap and now this), it’s kind of like having a 500 Horsepower Chevy SS with a 1 gallon gas tank. Yeah it looks and sounds cool but you can only ever drive it from your house to the gas station. The point is that in both cases they are a lot of performance that you can never use.