AT&T Granted Patent to Block all Online Piracy

vbimport

#1

We’ve just posted the following news: AT&T Granted Patent to Block all Online Piracy[newsimage]http://static.myce.com//images_posts/2013/07/ATT-Logo-Thumbnail.png[/newsimage]

US Patent shows AT&T considering blocking all online piracy

            Read the full article here: [http://www.myce.com/news/att-granted-patent-to-block-all-online-piracy-68005/](http://www.myce.com/news/att-granted-patent-to-block-all-online-piracy-68005/)

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#2

Now THIS would be hilarious. “All companies that block piracy must now pay a license fee to AT&T…”

THAT would be incredible. No doubt the formula (a Yes-No series) contains a healthy amount of intellectual property, but I hope the Patent Office contains a LOT MORE.

I see Google is applying for a patent for on-line gaming. I don’t know the extent of those specifics, but it sounded broad.

Who gets the patent for talking over the phone? Who gets the patent for any conversation among humans?

Is that the next subscriber or license-per-use fee?


#3

AT&T needs to mind its business which is providing clients access to the internet. Let the RIAA and the MPAA worry about combating piracy–as if it is really that huge of a problem.


#4

This is hilarious. Patent squatting at its finest.

Works for Apple (patented a rectangle with a touch screen that has a button on it) in all their BS global law suits against Samsung et al.


#5

I submitted a patent recently for posting comments in reaction/talk-back sections of news web sites. You will all owe me money one day.


#6

[QUOTE=CharmedonWB;2693357]AT&T needs to mind its business which is providing clients access to the internet. Let the RIAA and the MPAA worry about combating piracy–as if it is really that huge of a problem.[/QUOTE]

I completely agree. AT&T has absolutely no right to spy on it’s paying customers, especially if there’s no existing proof that they’ve done anything wrong. What’s next, WalMart is going to have spys follow me around to make sure I don’t resell the chocolate milk I buy, and use the resell money for illegal drugs? Is McDonald’s going to make sure I don’t get an eating disorder by puking up my food?

What’s really sad is everyone’s been quite upset about the fact that the NSA has been spying on people. However, when their own ISP’s do the same thing, no one will care.

If there are any AT&T customers out there, I strongly recommend that you cancel your contract with them, and switch to someone who doesn’t treat you like an automatic criminal (if there’s anyone else left). If AT&T asks you why you are cancelling, make sure answer tell them in the strongest language possible.


#7

[QUOTE=figgypuddy;2693371]This is hilarious. Patent squatting at its finest.

Works for Apple (patented a rectangle with a touch screen that has a button on it) in all their BS global law suits against Samsung et al.[/QUOTE]

Very true.

You can patent nearly anything but whether it stands up in Court or not is another matter, as many large organisations have found to their cost in the past.

[B]Wombler[/B]


#8

[QUOTE=ChristineBCW;2693355]Now THIS would be hilarious. “All companies that block piracy must now pay a license fee to AT&T…”

THAT would be incredible. No doubt the formula (a Yes-No series) contains a healthy amount of intellectual property, but I hope the Patent Office contains a LOT MORE.

I see Google is applying for a patent for on-line gaming. I don’t know the extent of those specifics, but it sounded broad.

Who gets the patent for talking over the phone? Who gets the patent for any conversation among humans?

Is that the next subscriber or license-per-use fee?[/QUOTE]

Yeah, the irony of that would indeed be delightful! :bigsmile:

[B]Wombler[/B]


#9

I may switch eventually . I sure don’t like this level of spying on me.

I can get Dish internet for close to the same price . Since I already have Dish TV .


#10

[QUOTE=Wombler;2693409]Very true.

You can patent nearly anything but whether it stands up in Court or not is another matter, as many large organisations have found to their cost in the past.

[B]Wombler[/B][/QUOTE]
Not quite true.
Apples lawyers abused the european legal system, designed to provide initial/temporary patent protection for minor companies or individuals, whilst they develop a product from a unique idea, and patented practically every possible screen and shape combination that has been released in a phone previously, or could conceivably be used for a portable device.

The loose requirements of the system meant that actual dimensions, ratios, capabilites, construction materials were considered irrelevant by the system, basically granting apple the capability of blocking practically every product by competitors.

Apple just chose to exercise the option against Samsung, because they were the strongest competitor to the IPhone.


#11

Cholla, “switching” is something of an option but we’ve discussed before Quality Of End-Product from those two services. If we can get Congress to repeal their 2003 laws that carved up every city into AT&T, Time-Warner and ComCast zones of influence - virtual Brandenburg Gates for broadband access that eliminated true competition - then we might have something.

As it is, only the Johnny Come Latelys (Google and Verizon FIOS) and a few “restricted to local service only small-timers” can offer that, and everyone’s seeing how slow that process is.


#12

Who’s going to get the patent for the coincidental occurrence of typing a key on a keyboard and having a similar object displayed on-screen? With Steve Jobs in the great hereafter, is he really trying to get lordly blessing for the patent on fingers? Hopefully, the Shinto priests are a step ahead of him.


#13

It seems like AT&T wants no broadband customers. If you piss off customers, they stop paying you and go somewhere else. In over 95% of where AT&T provides (WIRED) broadband a cable company also does. Usually that name is Comcast.


#14

Suddenlink is the cable company in my area but they are more expensive than AT&T . Since this is a new patent I suppose it will take a while before it is in full use.
Dish satellite is the next best alternative pricewise for me.
There is a discount for a bundle since I already have the Dish for TV channels.
The only problem I see is occasional interruption from bad weather.
If it doesn’t happen any more than the TV signal gets interrupted I could live with that.


#15

@cholla, isn’t dish’s satellite service provided by Hughesnet?
I have read many bad reviews of internet satellite.
Not that they are all true.
It would be interesting how Dish’s version fairs…in relation to other internet satellite services.
I have tossed around whether to try it many times in the past.
So far I have been reluctant.


#16

“Have you ever downloaded movies, and then the next morning you have cops show up at your door? You will. And the company that’ll bring it to you: AT&T.”

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TZb0avfQme8

A company full of visions. With empty promises. Very sad.


#17

Steve , As best as I could find you are correct about Dish being Hughesnet.
I’m not just jumping on the change as it’s always a PITA to change ISPs.
I still have some time on the discount rate at AT&T so I will probably let that run out.
One thing I don’t like about the Dish internet deal is there is a “small print” charge that you don’t see with the “BIG” price shown. They charge an extra $10.00 per month for an equipment lease. If I go with Dish I would ask that to be waved or see if I could “buy” the equipment. I would rather just pay one time for that.
On my Dish TV I’m not paying any equipment lease . At least not directly . If it’s hidden in the price Dish didn’t tell me. Of course I’ve had Dish TV since 2000 .
The satellite receiver I replaced (just this year) I owned . The one I have now belongs to Dish.Which just means if I cancel I have to return it or pay way more than it’s worth.
What kind of irritated me is after having Dish for 13 years I still had to agree to a two year contract to get the receiver “free” .
Also if I lived where there was a lot of rain I probably wouldn’t even consider Dish internet. Not a problem here we have too little rain. So with TV I rarely have a interruption.


#18

Cholla, what’s the hometown population like there? 200k? How much larger is it using an hour’s drive radius? Another 50k?

I want to see if I can find out how many American cities suffer from these similar circumstances. Waco (200k) has Time-Warner broadband but there are 80k within 30 miles of it that don’t.


#19

[QUOTE=cholla;2693699]Also if I lived where there was a lot of rain I probably wouldn’t even consider Dish internet. Not a problem here we have too little rain. So with TV I rarely have a interruption.[/QUOTE]

I didn’t realise any satellite TV provider there actually delivers the Internet via satellite. Here, the satellite TV provider Sky delivers its Internet and phone service via DSL. While there are Satellite-based Internet providers here, they are all independent of the TV provider and the few that offer TV just basically sell a free-to-air satellite receiver for picking up the subscription-free UK channels.

Besides the rain and latency, have a look at the monthly data allowance. From a glance at DISH’s support page, their packages range between 2.3GB and 25GB a month. Even here in Ireland, most satellite Internet providers here have ridiculously small monthly caps with as little as 2GB/month.


#20

Seán ,Thanks for pointing out the monthly caps . I hadn’t checked them .
Dish doesn’t exactly make them jump out at you .
Even after looking I would need to make sure which I would be getting.
It seems Dish uses or has used 3.
Exede ,dishNET ViaSat ,& dishNET Hughes
http://www.dish.com/legal/?WT.svl=gsearch_results
It seems the lowest priced package would be 5GB download per 30 days Anytime data.
Then 5GB bonus download for between the hours of 2:00 AM and 8:00 AM local time per 30 days. I could probably get by on that but it would be small compared to the 150GB anytime I get with AT&T now.