Are You Getting All of the HDTV Resolution

Read this test on HD TV’s
http://hometheatermag.com/hookmeup/1107hook2/
I think I’ll wait to go HD until I can be sure I’m really getting it! Not enough sets pass testing to even bother looking for one that does at this point in time.

[QUOTE=wonderwrench;1947804]Read this test on HD TV’s
http://hometheatermag.com/hookmeup/1107hook2/
I think I’ll wait to go HD until I can be sure I’m really getting it! Not enough sets pass testing to even bother looking for one that does at this point in time.[/QUOTE]
Might it make more sense to go look at the monitors and make up your own mind? Are benchmark tests really going to tell you if you like the picture or not?

Obsolete info, IMO.

Anyone should know by now that HD READY is marketing bs and 1080p only supported by better devices.

[QUOTE=CDan;1947806]Might it make more sense to go look at the monitors and make up your own mind? Are benchmark tests really going to tell you if you like the picture or not?[/QUOTE]
Well if a set can not correctly deinterlace and perform 3:2 pull down its crap and between the 2 tests of the 74 sets tested only 10 passed. You could buy a set that passes if the model has not already been discontinued. Or spend 100’s of hours at a retailer testing sets your self. What test method would you use? Eye ball it? I do not think so. With such blatant defects the test method used by Home Theater Mag is the way to go.

[QUOTE=chef;1947856]Obsolete info, IMO.

Anyone should know by now that HD READY is marketing bs and 1080p only supported by better devices.[/QUOTE]

What? What makes it obsolete? The test was done last month.
The test disk was made by Silicon Optix’s one of if not the best manufactures of video processing equipment out there.

Electronics were hard to by before HD. With most companies using crap signal processors in their HD TV’s its way harder to choose a set.

All HD sets except CRT’s display a progressive scan picture. Its the nature or the beast. If a set can’t correctly deinterlace a interlaced input your nice shiny new 1080p set will be displaying 540 lines of resolution. Even a set thats 1080i still displays the picture progressively so the same thing will happen.
Same goes for 720p

If a set can’t correctly perform 3:2 pull down you loose resolution to a varying degree plus end up with artifacts.

OK, some monitor makers are selling crappy electronics. Wow, what a surprise! Never heard of this happening before!

Right. :slight_smile:

I don’t say 1080p LCD is better just because it supports 1080p…
HD READY is marketing BS and so “FullHD” is too.

I rely on useful features like true 24p and the possibility to disable Overscan aswell as a relative low power consumption need.

[QUOTE=wonderwrench;1947804]Read this test on HD TV’s
http://hometheatermag.com/hookmeup/1107hook2/
I think I’ll wait to go HD until I can be sure I’m really getting it! Not enough sets pass testing to even bother looking for one that does at this point in time.[/QUOTE]

My Sony 50" HD RPTV is not on the list and I don’t know how it would fair, but the picture is spectacular so if you want “wait to go HD until I can be sure I’m really getting it!” it is really your loss. It is light years better than the 32" Sony analog tv that it replaced and that was a terrific tv for it’s time. If you go HD, you will spend a lot of time going…WOW!!! Even 720p is awful good.

I agree with Dan, chef and ricoman I bought my system about 2 months ago because it looked like the best picture when compared to many many others. TV and Blu-ray player are already yesterdays news as they have newer LCD tv’s with LED smartlighting and such. You get diigging too deep and you will never decide which is best, or buy one and wait two weeks and something bigger and better will be out. No win situation IMO. I say just enjoy what you bought and live with it. Even some Blu-ray movies are not as sharp and crystal clear as others.

Did you not read this article close enough?

[B]The most important thing to remember as you read this article is that there are many factors involved in developing a great HD picture. These tests—along with a set’s ability to produce black, the actual contrast ratio (the ratio of black to white), the color accuracy, and more—all play a part. The tests performed here are important, but they only represent aspects of each TV’s overall performance. You should not judge a TV based solely on these tests (or any single aspect of performance).[/B]

You are going to have to be a little more rational in your thinking towards HD, or you will never get in.

:cool::cool:

I’m more than satisfied with both of my HD TVs . . . the picture on my 50" plasma is awesome and the 37" LCD is crystal clear.

:wink:

[QUOTE=platinumsword;1948455]Did you not read this article close enough?

You are going to have to be a little more rational in your thinking towards HD, or you will never get in.

:cool::cool:[/QUOTE]

Well you must be the first one that did read it besides me.
Many things need to be right other than the ability to correctly deinterlace and perform 3:2 pull down but if these 2 tests fail why look any farther it’s a waste of time looking at a set that fails. You better read your quote again as you have it backwards. “You should not judge a TV based solely on these tests (or any single aspect of performance)” This is is telling you many things have to be correct besides the tests we performed. Not these test do not mean much so disregard them.

Well you can all watch your HD TV’s at half their screen resolution and pretend you are watching a quality picture as its OK with me. Of course a very few of you may have gotten lucky and are getting what you paid for.
You have about a 1 in 10 chance at best in getting what you paid for when buying a HD TV without using sound testing methods.

I will STFU now as its no use talking to rocks!

The tests done were quite extensive unfortunately not all HDTVs are tested. Nevertheless I appreciate sharing this research here, [B]wonderwrench[/B]. :wink:

I guess I’m one of the lucky ones, paid 50% off MSRP back in April so even if it was in the list and failed on 3:2 test, the picture quality is far better than my old CRT so I think I’d still be getting what I paid for. :smiley:

Anyway, what do you guys think of any solution for this? Early adaptors (including myself) enjoy the higher image quality on their HDTV however this research by Home Theater magazine suggested that not all HDTV in the market has the ability to process the image correctly.

[QUOTE=wonderwrench;1948774] “You should not judge a TV based solely on these tests (or any single aspect of performance)” This is is telling you many things have to be correct besides the tests we performed. Not these test do not mean much so disregard them.
[/QUOTE]

I am not disregarding them, I am just pointing out the fact that it sound like you are making your decision solely based on this research and you shouldn’t.

Some HDTVs do a better job of this de-interlacing process than others, but usually the artifacts caused by improper de-interlacing are difficult for most viewers to spot.

If it really means that much to you then get yourself a dedicated video scaler. The average consumer would not go this far, nor do I think they would want to invest the extra money. As for hardcore videophiles they have been using dedicated video scalers to improve the picture quality on high end displays for years.

:cool::cool:

[quote=zevia;1948793]
Anyway, what do you guys think of any solution for this? Early adaptors (including myself) enjoy the higher image quality on their HDTV however this research by Home Theater magazine suggested that not all HDTV in the market has the ability to process the image correctly. [/quote] Mine (a Samsung LN_T4671F) wasn’t on the list nor was the model before it, so it looks like an older comparison. But by the looks of it a lot of Samsung’s failed somewhere so it wouldn’t shock me to find out mine fails as well. Still think the picture was one of the best available at the time of purchase and I am very happy with it. So do I really want to know?

Personally i think, if you’re happy with the picture on your display, why worry to much about it?
Let your eyeball be the judge and just enjoy your purchase.

I agree, my Samsung HP-T5054 provided one the best Quality Picture I have notice so far. Samsung TV displays are reaaly the one to enjoy considering PQ for the price you buying.

[QUOTE=Dee-27;1950834]Personally i think, if you’re happy with the picture on your display, why worry to much about it?
Let your eyeball be the judge and just enjoy your purchase.[/QUOTE]

Speaking of eyeballs here is an example of incorrect deinterlacing compared to
correctly done deinterlacing. This of course is using quality source material.


The correct one is indeed smoother.

So to rephrase my question, what’s the solution or what should we do? Can we complain to manufactures because they incorrectly process the deinterlacing and 3:2? Class action?

[QUOTE=zevia;1951239]The correct one is indeed smoother.

So to rephrase my question, what’s the solution or what should we do?[/QUOTE]

For the average consumer, not much. Deal with the tools on hand at a reasonable price to maximize the experience. For ones that are truly hardcore than buying a dedicated video scaler would solve this issue.

Example: Depending on the features wanted prices range from $1500 and up.

Link: http://anchorbaytechnologies.com/products/systems/index.php

:cool::cool: