Are curved TVs a gimmick?

vbimport

#1

For the first time since the death of CRT, numerous nonflat televisions will make it onto store shelves. But has the drive to differentiate and turn a profit bent these boob tubes far beyond beneficial?

Link: http://ces.cnet.com/8301-35303_1-57617072/are-curved-tvs-a-gimmick/

:cool::cool:


#2

My gut is telling me this is another 3D type of hype to sell TVs to people who are gullible enough to buy into the hype. The curved screens I have seen (at Disney World) were radically curved and gave the impression of a 360 degree view field. I don’t see where a 70" TV that is 10’-12’ from the viewer will offer much in the way of visual effect. The human eye is designed to focus very fast and very often so I don’t see the need for a curved TV screen to make the job of focusing easier.

I do find it ironic that the TV manufacturers were tell us just a few years ago that flat screen tube TVs (compared to curved screens) were great and now they are saying that LCD TVs are better with a curved screen. I think I smell BS wafting in the air.


#3

[QUOTE=UTR;2716249]I do find it ironic that the TV manufacturers were tell us just a few years ago that flat screen tube TVs (compared to curved screens) were great and now they are saying that LCD TVs are better with a curved screen. I think I smell BS wafting in the air.[/QUOTE] To be fair, CRT screens curved the wrong way so flat screens were an improvement.

My first impression is that this is a gimmick like 3D and 4K but let’s see what happens.


#4

[QUOTE=DrageMester;2716252][B]To be fair, CRT screens curved the wrong way so flat screens were an improvement.
[/B]
My first impression is that this is a gimmick like 3D and 4K but let’s see what happens.[/QUOTE]

Good point. Although I do think that CRTs going from curved to flat will prove to be a more tangible improvement in picture quality than LCDs going from flat to curved. The only benefit I can see of having a curved screen is to give the impression of a wider field of vision which would require a very large screen. Much larger than a TV one would typically have in their home.


#5

I’d be more interested in what sort of geometry processing is in use on these. I’d expect they require a very specific viewing distance to avoid perceptual geometry issues. A slight curve will help with your eye’s focal distance, especially on a larger screen, but at too great a distance - or too short - problems could arise. Like 3D, your eyes will have to re-focus any time you shift your gaze to a different part of the screen. This is also true with a flat screen if you sit too close.


#6

[QUOTE=UTR;2716254]Good point. Although I do think that CRTs going from curved to flat will prove to be a more tangible improvement in picture quality than LCDs going from flat to curved. The only benefit I can see of having a curved screen is to give the impression of a wider field of vision which would require a very large screen. Much larger than a TV one would typically have in their home.[/QUOTE]

You forgot one more thing. From CRT to LCD, it was like a DOWNGRADE from 30 inch to 15 inch. What’s happening now is more like an UPGRADE from 50 inch to 105 inch.

However, the most important factor here is you haven’t seen really curved panels yet. Flat means flat. It means just flat. Flat panel technology needed to be flat but different flat panels had different depths and different weights. Curve means a variety of angles and directions. It needs not literally mean a globe-like curve.


#7

[QUOTE=CDan;2716257]I’d be more interested in what sort of geometry processing is in use on these. I’d expect they require a very specific viewing distance to avoid perceptual geometry issues. A slight curve will help with your eye’s focal distance, especially on a larger screen, but at too great a distance - or too short - problems could arise. Like 3D, your eyes will have to re-focus any time you shift your gaze to a different part of the screen. This is also true with a flat screen if you sit too close.[/QUOTE]
Ars Technica examined the viewing distance/angle of view in an article yesterday:


#8

[QUOTE=Kenshin;2716295]You forgot one more thing. From CRT to LCD, it was like a DOWNGRADE from 30 inch to 15 inch. What’s happening now is more like an UPGRADE from 50 inch to 105 inch.

However, the most important factor here is you haven’t seen really curved panels yet. Flat means flat. It means just flat. Flat panel technology needed to be flat but different flat panels had different depths and different weights. Curve means a variety of angles and directions. It needs not literally mean a globe-like curve.[/QUOTE]

IMO, even at 105" the viewing distance would have to be very short and the curve quite severe to improve peripheral enhancements while viewing. I would think this technology would be better applied to goggles than a conventional TV screen. I just don’t see where a slightly curved screen will give anyone the “wow” factor like they are claiming.


#9

[QUOTE=Kerry56;2716305]Ars Technica examined the viewing distance/angle of view in an article yesterday:
http://arstechnica.com/gadgets/2014/01/whats-the-deal-with-curved-tvs/[/QUOTE]

What might help make this succeed is that curved screens make the screen seem larger than it actually is according to the article. However this makes me wonder if the image would need manipulated and distorted to enhance this perception. I guess I will have to wait to see one in person before passing final judgement on the technology.


#10

There may be some advantages but I’d imagine that unless you’re sitting directly in front of it your viewing experience could be reduced rather than improved depending on what angle you’re looking at.

Not entirely ideal for the typical living room layout.

[B]Wombler[/B]


#11

[QUOTE=CDan;2716257]I’d be more interested in what sort of geometry processing is in use on these. I’d expect they require a very specific viewing distance to avoid perceptual geometry issues. A slight curve will help with your eye’s focal distance, especially on a larger screen, but at too great a distance - or too short - problems could arise. Like 3D, your eyes will have to re-focus any time you shift your gaze to a different part of the screen. This is also true with a flat screen if you sit too close.[/QUOTE]

:iagree::iagree::iagree::iagree::iagree:

Sitting at the wrong distance would be terrible. Also, sitting off-centre would be terrible.

I see a favorable market for curved tvs in the marketing sector of the economy.