Are 150W enough for burning?

vbimport

#1

I've just installed a CD writer in my PC. It works fine, but I often get some 'Power Calibration Error' messages, especially with CD-RW.
I wonder if my power supply couldn't be a little weak with 150W? Does anyone know how much power is necessary? I have 2 hard disks drives (1.6 Gb each), a CD-ROM reader and a CD writer. It's a Pentium 166.
Thanks for the answers!


#2

ROTFL… (please forgive me)

power calibration error has little to do with the actual power of your power supply unit.

From Iomega’s website :

You may encounter power calibration errors each time you use your CD-RW drive if you are using poor quality media.

Your CD-RW drive uses a power calibration process that adjusts the recording laser power to the optimum level for each recordable disc you insert into the drive. Each CD-R and CD-RW disc contains a reference value for laser power in a preformed track, which helps the CD-RW drive determine the ideal laser power. There is also a special area on each CD-R and CD-RW disc set aside for the CD-RW drive’s laser to power up to the level required to burn the disc. If the laser power calibration process fails, a power calibration error will occur.


#3

…although 150 watt power supply is definetly on the low side ;)…its always better to have more than is necessary, as the computer will only use what is needed.


#4

150 is not enough for the latest generation of processors
you will need 250+…

i do not know if this causes the poer calibration failure…but it can lead to an instable computer.

(but as you have a p166 the 150 watt can not be a problem)

What kind of burner do you have??


#5

Thanks for all the answers! :slight_smile:

My burner is a HP CD Writer 7200i

I was asking this question because I bought a CD-RW (Maxell) with which I’ve not been able to do anything. Nero gave me a Power calibration error, and several packet writing softwares simply refused to format it.
I tried this very CD on a friend’s burner, and it worked fine, with no problem…:confused:

I tried another CD-RW; it works better, but I still have problems to write on it. With CD-R, it’s much better.


#6

THe 7200i isn’t HP’s finest product indeed.
It might not hurt to get the latest firmware for it.

Perhaps there’s even tweaked firmware for it but that’s on your own risk.

Again : the PSU power has nothing to do with the power calibration error.

In an ideal situation the complete system would take some 240 watts of which the most (40 to 80 watts) is taken by the CPU. Then harddisks take the cake.

Get a certified 300Watt powersupply and you’re always good for business. Thing is most powersupplies under 250 Watts aren’t using high optimal components. (Power fluctuations and stuff like that)

P.S. :

Don’t do crossposts … not even cloaked ones

http://forum.cdfreaks.com/showthread.php?threadid=46702


#7

Ok! If the PSU power has nothing to do with the power calibration error, I don’t think I need to change my power supply, then; except for that error message, I don’t have any other problem on my PC.
I went on the HP website, and according to them, I have the latest firmware on my writer. I don’t want to try other firmware, I think it’s much too risky!
What do you mean when you say that this writer is not a really good one?
Do you think I should try to clean it? And if so, could you give me some advise about how to do it and with what?
Thanks a lot!


#8

Originally posted by Tof
Ok! If the PSU power has nothing to do with the power calibration error, I don’t think I need to change my power supply, then; except for that error message, I don’t have any other problem on my PC.
I went on the HP website, and according to them, I have the latest firmware on my writer. I don’t want to try other firmware, I think it’s much too risky!
What do you mean when you say that this writer is not a really good one?
Do you think I should try to clean it? And if so, could you give me some advise about how to do it and with what?
Thanks a lot!

I don’t know about this HP writer , but i heard rumors that they are protected in the overburn and cd media.

you cannot put a second more on the media than 80 minutes ( if it’s an 80 minutes cd writer) and the hp tends to have a preference for its own cd’s.
I’ve experienced this with certain cd-rw’s , that when you burn with the cd-rw that is supplied with it , it’s on the fastest rw speed , but when using other media , it’s getting lower. (even when it’s certified for the writers max speed and works on other writers).


#9

I think I’ll try to buy an HP CD-RW… We’ll see!

Do you think it could help to clean the writer? I heard many things about it. What’s your opinion?


#10

Originally posted by Tof
[B]I think I’ll try to buy an HP CD-RW… We’ll see!

Do you think it could help to clean the writer? I heard many things about it. What’s your opinion? [/B]

Trying to clean the writer may cause more damage than you might expect… A little dust of fingerprint on the lens could ruin it forever. Dee-Ehn knows some more information about this cleaning process.

Use the cleaning only as the very very last option and be ready to lose your writer for ever if it goes horribly wrong.


#11

When done carefully, cleaning a lens can’t do mich damage.
But be aware, a lens is extremely sensitive!

First, open up the device. After demounting some screws and panels, you should be able to see the lense somewhere. I guess you know what it looks like!

For cleaning the lens, you’d best use a fluid. For the best results, you need a fluid that doesn’t leave anything behind and that doesn’t affect material a lense can be made of.
I strongly recommend you to use nothing but distilled water. Distilled water can be bought at quite some stores (drug stores for example) and is quite cheap.

So, here’s the process.
Use a cotton-wool-stick. Wet it in your bottle of distilled water. After that, touch your skin softly with the cotton-wool-stick so that any big drop of water will come off.
Now it’s time to clean your lens very well. If you got a good, clear, powerful lamp, use it to light your lens. Take a magnifying glass
as well, to see any small parts of dust on the lens.
Carefully remove ALL dust you can see, with making use of the cotton-wool-stick.
When it’s clean, you’ll see that there is still a little bit of water on the lens left. No worry, just let it dry (it may take some time, I know).

Now it’s time to look at the lens once again? Clean? Then re-assemble your drive. Still dirty? Clean it again!

When done right, errors due to a filthy lens should be over.
When done faulty, errors may get worse!

Good luck cleaning your lens. For any questions, feel free to ask.

p.s. I don’t take any responsibility for any damaged that may be caused doing this process. It always worked fine for me, but I can’t garantee anything…


#12

Thank you for all your explanations! Now, I don’t really know what to do… your warnings quite scare me! But I start thinking that my writer’s got a problem.
I’ve just tried a third CD-RW, a HP one, and it’s not better. I can burn it with Nero with almost no problem. But erasing it is difficult and I can’t format it in UDF at all. (I tried 3 different softwares)
The only thing I’ve not tested yet is to UDF-format a CD-R. It seems I have less problem with CD-R than with CD-RW.
Now, you told me that the power of my power supply isn’t involved in this problem, maybe the last solution is to clean the lens. I don’t know yet which way is the best… I wouldn’t want to destroy something
Thanks again for your help!


#13

bring the writer back to the shop…you said in your first post something like

“just installed a cdrw in my computer”…

is it a new writer or second hand??


#14

It’s not a new writer, it’s a second hand one.
I said I just installed a cdrw, because I had just mounted my writer in my PC and that was my first tests… I never had any writer before that!


#15

I have a 7200i myself. It is retired now, used as a reader in my old P200 rig.
The problems with these drives are that the tray does not make a tight seal against the front of the drive. This allows dust to enter. So it may be very likely that your lens needs some cleaning.

BUT: Power calibration errors means that the drive can not perform the calibration of how much power it should use on the laser when burning that cd. (Most of the time, it could be a hardware error too, but then it would probably come every time you try to burn)
I remember mine too was quite picky, often giving this error on “new” media, certified for 12X burning speed and above.
Try different media types, and settle with one that works. :rolleyes:


#16

Thank you for your participation!
I agree with you when you say that if there was a hardware trouble, then I couldn’t burn at all. Don’t you think that if the lens was dirty, it would be the same?
Power calibration errors are not the only problems I have. When trying to erase a CD-RW, either it stops before the end, either it never stops. The same behaviour occurs while formatting in UDF. I didn’t find a CD-RW that don’t react like this, until now. But I have no problem to burn with Nero, in ISO9660, or in Audio.
This is why I’m not sure the lens is dirty. Why would it burn correctly, and not erase or format? Isn’t it the same procedure, for the writer?
Maybe problems occur when burning close to the external edge of the disc?
Last question: since you have the same writer than me, could you tell me what brand of CD-R and CD-RW did you use?
Thank you!


#17

I found HP`s own cdrws to work well. I bought some Lead data cdrws once, these are crap by all means, but then the HP did not like them either! :slight_smile:
I actually thought of scrapping them, but then I bought a Liteon 12X burner, and it worked fine with those discs.
One Megadata cdrw also worked OK for me.
My advice would be to get some old cdrws, certified for only 2X or max 4X. It did not want to burn the high-speed (10X) discs that came bundled with my Liteon either.

When it comes to cdrs, I have burned a lot of discs from Ritek, CMC (these have low quality), Sony and Verbatim.

The reason I retired mine, was that it sometimes made coasters, but the burning process seemed to turn out OK. I had to check each burned cd afterwards with CDcheck.
On the cds that went bad, a few files were unreadable, but most files were OK. This happened each third to fifth disc I burned.


#18

instead of opening the drive up like dee-ehn suggested, go out and buy yourself a cheap little maxell product, a cd lense cleaner. All it is is a cd with little bristles on the bottom. Put it in and listen to the horrible elevator music for a while and voila! It’s clean.

I’ve used one or two several times on my compact cd player and have had no problems, so knock your self out!

This is also great if your cd player (not computer) keeps slowly spinning up the cd and dosent play, buy one of these and it should stop right away (no i dont work for maxell)


#19

Yes, but this is originally made for home cd players, and I would be suspicious to using a cd like this in a high-speed cdrom. On a HP 7200i it will probably work well, it reads only at 6X, but I fear that if you use a cleaning cd on a 56X cdrom, the brush will be scattered all around the inside of your cdrom…:rolleyes:


#20

It’s me again! Well, finally, I decided to open my cd writer and to clean the lens, just like Dee-ehn explained it… Guest what? It works! Thank you Dee-ehn! :slight_smile:
Since the cleaning, I could format in UDF 2 different CD-RW, and I burned some data and audio files without any problem!
Well, with InCD, I still got a blue screen (‘Fatal error’) while checking for bad sectors; that’s why I changed for DirectCD. Now, it seems I don’t have any more problem; all the tests I could make since then are OK!
I think opening the CD writer is a little frightening, but it certainly allows a better and more efficient cleaning than with a cleaning disc. And I’m not sure that those discs aren’t totally harmful for the driver…
So, thanks to everyone who helped me! :slight_smile: :slight_smile: :slight_smile: