‘Apple deliberately slows down iPhones before a new release’

vbimport

#1

We’ve just posted the following news: ‘Apple deliberately slows down iPhones before a new release’[newsimage]http://static.myce.com//images_posts/2014/07/myce-iphone-graph-95x75.jpg[/newsimage]
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Read the full article here: http://www.myce.com/news/apple-deliberately-slows-down-iphones-before-a-new-release-72296

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#2

BS. I bought my iPhone 5 the day before 5S was released (for a heck of a “bargain”) and its always been lightning fast.
Also, is it “around” new releases or only “before” ? “Around” implies after as well, when millions of rabid owners of new iPhones are activating it and accessing the cloud etc.

Maybe, MAYBE, its something such as more users are backing up their phones to the cloud getting ready for the new release, so the cloud and Apple services are slower to respond. This is just an example of a possibility…

It would be too easy for that strategy to backfire. If my iPhone started acting slow and sluggish I might think about other brands rather than a new iPhone.


#3

I think the last sentence says it all. New iOS releases make old phones slower.
This could of course be a design decision by apple to push users to upgrade.


#4

Pftt. Lol. xD

… It’s nuts, that people will (still) choose to pay for Apple stuff - getting near-outdated hardware (antiquated or obsolete, hehe), for double the price of other devices; basically && this has been going on for MANY years, now. It’s funny, really. :slight_smile: :slight_smile:

(Err, not to mention the special ‘test’ functions - where the camera / and, or / microphone CAN be turned on remotely, on any device/iPhone; for the obvious uses of spying on people; true, or false, heh.)

[B]Edit[/B]:[QUOTE=aiolos;2732900]This could of course be a design decision by apple to push users to upgrade.[/QUOTE]
When it comes to Apple, I can believe it all. xD


#5

[QUOTE=ivid;2732884]BS. I bought my iPhone 5 the day before 5S was released (for a heck of a “bargain”) and its always been lightning fast.
Also, is it “around” new releases or only “before” ? “Around” implies after as well, when millions of rabid owners of new iPhones are activating it and accessing the cloud etc.

Maybe, MAYBE, its something such as more users are backing up their phones to the cloud getting ready for the new release, so the cloud and Apple services are slower to respond. This is just an example of a possibility…

It would be too easy for that strategy to backfire. If my iPhone started acting slow and sluggish I might think about other brands rather than a new iPhone.[/QUOTE]
I agree, total BS and unworthy of a headline of any sort. This student hasn’t learned that the “effects” she noticed don’t say a bloody thing about what the “cause” might be.

Apple’s icloud services and general download servers slow down periodically, and most notably around new iOS and product releases, for obvious reasons…

:stuck_out_tongue:


#6

[QUOTE=DukeOfUrl;2732931]Apple’s icloud services and general download servers slow down periodically, and most notably around new iOS and product releases, for obvious reasons…

:p[/QUOTE]

Really what is the obvious reasons? Care to enlighten us then…if you already know the insider trades secret???


#7

This is the fundamental problem with proprietary software… no one knows how it works except a few who are sworn to secrecy. The general public isn’t allowed to know what types of practices are buried in the software, which means that claims like this cannot be confirmed or denied, except by their developers, who might not be telling the truth, or might only be telling part of the truth, or by one or more individuals with enough time, skills, and willpower to engage in reverse engineering (which itself is probably illegal).


#8

There are genuine instances where an OS upgrade will cause issues, as mentioned. But is it deliberate? Gonna be hard to say, especially when you have to define what aspect was deliberate*, then have documents from the various planning phases and/or easily-navigable source code for each device across a variety of OS releases to give proof of intent.

I know I’m susceptible to placebo/nocebo effects and try to work around them as best I can, so I don’t consider this a major concern for myself. I might be open to buying a new device if it becomes utterly unusable, but I also know my general upgrade cycle well enough to know when I am causing it to be unusable because I just do too much. [Yes, that is a thing for me.**]

*: slowing the device down for the express purpose of selling new devices, or simply pushing out an update with no regard for performance (expecting things to be fine) for the sake of end user experience and brand reputation.

**: I’m pretty sure I run across physical hardware limitations more readily than most people, and I also run across physical hardware degradation from time to time, but I can only wonder whether I use devices for a period longer than intended by the manufacturers.


#9

[QUOTE=coolcolors;2733043]Really what is the obvious reasons? Care to enlighten us then…if you already know the insider trades secret???[/QUOTE]

Simple–heavy traffic on the servers. I thought in this group that went without saying.