Apache server

That Motorola is your modem not your router. What router do you have?

WBR-2310

D-LINK

Your web server is now on some ip with some port, your local computer on its local network.
Let’s say it’s on 192.168.0.101 on port 80 (tcp port)

Now all you need to to is have your network (that is, the router) to accept “connections from the outside/internet” over a certain port to 192.168.100.15 on port 80.

This can also be written as :

OUTBOUND: *:80 -> 192.168.0.101:80

This means any ip that has a port 80 request (normal http/website behaviour) will get forwarded to 192.168.0.101 port 80.

There are tons of Dlink routers, but here is an example of a Dlink DFL-200 port forwarding.


I seriously advise studying basic network configuration. Learn what a modem, a router, forwarding and NAT is and before you know it you know everything about hosting internet applications.

ok. I have gone and set up my router. But i still dont understand how i could connect to my website from a different computer that is on a totaly different network. If it has http:// on the front, it just wont open on a network that isnt mine?

[QUOTE=vlad4242;2478088]ok. I have gone and set up my router. But i still dont understand how i could connect to my website from a different computer that is on a totaly different network.[/quote] That’s just what routers do! They “route” the request to the ip adress (of another network) that is defined in the router.

Test it with another computer. Get a friend to type in the ip of your modem like http://speedtouch.dsl.co.au or something…

So, if you accept all incoming requests from port 80 (port 80 is open in the firewall) and redirect it to your computer running a webserver (routing to another ip, perhaps even another port, but let’s say it stays on 80) it will redirect the request to your webserver and the webserver responds back with the result. (http request accepted, here is your info. Handled by the webserver).

If it has http:// on the front, it just wont open on a network that isnt mine?
These days you don’t need http:// anymore. The http reuquest on port 80 is enough.

You need to install DynDNS updater and put your information into the updater http://www.dyndns.com/support/ this program (which you need) tells the net that this is where to go when someone types your address in. If you don’t have an updater for the DynDNS service your apache server will be very lonely.

Have you opened ports 80 and 8080 through your router? Sometimes these things need rebooting after changing virtual server/application ports settings. If the router has something called a DMZ area put your server ip and ports in there… just temp putting it outside the firewall… and then if it works when tested you will need to check which ports are open… I have a home built one so I know nothing about d-link… my router runs iptables on slackware and is solid… From your posts the server is up and running… now you need to open those request ports to the outside world (that IS where the problem is… if it will work inside the network it will work outside to the net if it’s allowed to connect), and as it’s no doubt a windows server get ready to rebuild it within hours as it gets hacked to bits. Image it now… so a restore is easy.

One way to test safely is to set up the tracker in azureus… no files needed… that will run a nice test webpage on port 6969 and will also tell you your outside ip.

I am throgh with apache now. I will use the less comlincated AppWeb.

AppWeb… I wonder why nobody in the professional webserver field uses that… oh yes… 10k easy scriptkiddie hacks.

the problem wasn’t apache fool… it was your stupid firewall/router settings… bloody windows and it’s garbage and incompetent users… sigh apache is a no brainer to set up and configure… 20 years and 99% of the internet using it can’t possibly be wrong!

[QUOTE=janrocks;2485802]AppWeb… I wonder why nobody in the professional webserver field uses that… oh yes… 10k easy scriptkiddie hacks.

the problem wasn’t apache fool…

it was your stupid firewall/router settings… bloody windows and it’s garbage and incompetent users… sigh apache is a no brainer to set up and configure… 20 years and 99% of the internet using it can’t possibly be wrong![/QUOTE] I doubt ranting about it will help the original poster any step further in setting up a nice apache server.