Anyone for Kaby Lake?

vbimport

#1

Released earlier in the week, the new Intel Kaby Lake platform.
Kaby Lake is an incremental update to the Sky Lake platform.
It’s the same architecture as Sky Lake. It has a higher base clock and higher turbo frequency.

From what I’ve seen, it will do 5GHz quite easily on high end air cooling. Alongside the Kaby Lake CPU comes the Z270 chipset, which has 4 more PCIe3 lanes from the PCH, and when used with a Kaby Lake CPU has support for Intel Optane storage.

I will be waiting until the new enthusiast platform (Sky Lake X and Kaby Lake X with the LGA2066 and X299 chipset) is released in H2 2017.

Anyone here going for Kaby Lake?


#2

[QUOTE=Dee;2786598]Released earlier in the week, the new Intel Kaby Lake platform.
Kaby Lake is an incremental update to the Sky Lake platform.
It’s the same architecture as Sky Lake. It has a higher base clock and higher turbo frequency.

From what I’ve seen, it will do 5GHz quite easily on high end air cooling. Alongside the Kaby Lake CPU comes the Z270 chipset, which has 4 more PCIe3 lanes from the PCH, and when used with a Kaby Lake CPU has support for Intel Optane storage.

I will be waiting until the new enthusiast platform (Sky Lake X and Kaby Lake X with the LGA2066 and X299 chipset) is released in H2 2017.

Anyone here going for Kaby Lake?[/QUOTE]

Hi Wendy, I also am running ther 6700K with the Z170 formula, my next build will be the LGA 2066 also. I have big ideas in mind for the water cooling on the new build. I am running the 6700K at a 10% overclock now and its very stable


#3

As you said Wendy, only four more PCIe lanes and support for intel optane, something that intel promises to be faster than SSD and close to RAM?
So the answer has to be NO.


#4

[QUOTE=Dee;2786598]Released earlier in the week, the new Intel Kaby Lake platform.
Kaby Lake is an incremental update to the Sky Lake platform.
It’s the same architecture as Sky Lake. It has a higher base clock and higher turbo frequency.

From what I’ve seen, it will do 5GHz quite easily on high end air cooling. Alongside the Kaby Lake CPU comes the Z270 chipset, which has 4 more PCIe3 lanes from the PCH, and when used with a Kaby Lake CPU has support for Intel Optane storage.

I will be waiting until the new enthusiast platform (Sky Lake X and Kaby Lake X with the LGA2066 and X299 chipset) is released in H2 2017.

Anyone here going for Kaby Lake?[/QUOTE]

No… For what I use my PC for, my old 4790K is more than capable. The last three generations of intel possessors are not ground breaking by any means. Unless you have the need for the latest and greatest, upgrading is a waste of money.
BTW, I’ve been running @ 4.6 GHz for two years. 5 Ghz is nothing amazing.


#5

The only amazing thing about 5GHz, is its taken them so long to get to that milestone, which should be reachable for most users with a KabyLake 7700K.
My Sandy Bridge would do 4.3GHz four years ago.

Did you know you can drop a SkyLake CPU into a Z270 mobo, or a KabyLake CPU into a Z170 mobo (with a bios update).

You’ll be missing some features in either case. I’ll get a list of features later.


#6

[QUOTE=Dee;2786674]The only amazing thing about 5GHz, is its taken them so long to get to that milestone, which should be reachable for most users with a KabyLake 7700K.
My Sandy Bridge would do 4.3GHz four years ago.

Did you know you can drop a SkyLake CPU into a Z270 mobo, or a KabyLake CPU into a Z170 mobo (with a bios update).

You’ll be missing some features in either case. I’ll get a list of features later.[/QUOTE]

  1. No Intel Optane. Said to be as fast as RAM disc, but I’ll believe it when I see Wendys review on it.:wink:

#7

This might be the only reason to move to Z270, but thankfully Intel has not releases Optane yet :slight_smile: so I will stay on X99 for as long as I can get away with it.


#8

Without much competition from AMD there really isn’t a reason for Intel to make major upgrades. KabyLake has the same number of cores. A few video enhancements… We will see if he AMD Ryzen will make a dent in Intel’s sales. I’m not holding my breath. It’s a shame Motorola left the CPU market. Motorola really is no longer an American manufacturer. Well, Intel chips are also made abroad but engineered in the US. No foundries to found in the US. Back in the day Motorola made some fine CPU’s.

[QUOTE=Dee;2786674]The only amazing thing about 5GHz, is its taken them so long to get to that milestone, which should be reachable for most users with a KabyLake 7700K.
My Sandy Bridge would do 4.3GHz four years ago.

Did you know you can drop a SkyLake CPU into a Z270 mobo, or a KabyLake CPU into a Z170 mobo (with a bios update).

You’ll be missing some features in either case. I’ll get a list of features later.[/QUOTE]


#9

I don’t see me testing Intel Optane for SSD anytime soon.
Optane at the moment focuses of two technologies.

1, Optane for memory (non volatile for DIMM) capacities from 16GB to 32GB, and not as fast as RAM.
2, Optane for SSD (made for SSD), Nowhere near as fast as RAM, but much faster than NAND. Capacities unknown at the moment.

Prices for both, I would think is very likely to be out of reach for most consumers.

Ok back on topic.

[B]SkyLake platform (Z170) has the following native features.
[/B]
20 PCIe3 lanes from the platform controller hub (PCH).
Up to 6 SATA 6Gbps ports.
Up to 10 USB3 ports.
DMI3 8GT/s transfer rate over 4 lanes.
1 native hyper 32Gbps M.2 slot with support for NVMe SSDs.
Intel SkyLake speed shift (an enhanced version of EIST which is smoother and more scalable providing your motherboard and BIOS supports it).

[B]KabyLake platform (Z270) has the following native features.
[/B]
24 PCIe3 lanes from the platform controller hub (PCH).
Up to 6 SATA 6Gbps ports.
Up to 10 USB3 ports.
DMI3 8GT/s transfer rate over 4 lanes.
2 native hyper 32Gbps M.2 slot with support for NVMe SSDs.
Intel KabyLake speed shift 2 (an enhanced version of speed shift 1).
Intel Optane Storage.

[B]Dropping an KabyLake CPU into Z170.
[/B]You would lose a native M.2 slot.
You would lose Intel Optane storage.
You would lose Intel Speed Shift 2 (may get it with a updated BIOS).

[B]Dropping an SkyLake CPU into Z270
[/B]You would lose Intel Optane.

So apart from a few features, and faster potential overclocks, there isn’t much new in KabyLake.

If I was to buy a Z270 motherboard though, It would almost certainly be the ASRock Z270 Super Carrier. Which is just insane.

Asus already have KabyLake support for most of their Z170 motherboards.

You are looking for a series 3xxx Asus Z170 bios.

The easy way to tell if your Z170 will support KabyLake can be seen in the screenshot from the Asus Z170 Deluxe UEFI below.


#10

The Pentium series of KabyLake CPUs will have hyper threading enabled. I might do mini-ITX/STX build with one of these CPUs for a 4k capable HTPC but that will be as far as I go.


#11

[QUOTE=UTR;2786683]The Pentium series of KabyLake CPUs will have hyper threading enabled. I might do mini-ITX/STX build with one of these CPUs for a 4k capable HTPC but that will be as far as I go.[/QUOTE]That along with a nice Z270 or H270 ITX mobo would make quite a nice HTPC, as the IGPU on KabyLake supports 4K decoding in hardware.


#12

[QUOTE=Dee;2786719]That along with a nice Z270 or H270 ITX mobo would make quite a nice HTPC, as the IGPU on KabyLake supports 4K decoding in hardware.[/QUOTE]

That is why I am considering the Kaby Lake CPUs. I have a Mini ITX 1151 motherboard that has a display port so I would like to use it if possible. I also like the Mini STX motherboards and might go with one of those. I think most of them support HDMI 2.0 or better.


#13

I recently updated from Sandy Bridge (i7-2600K) to Kaby Lake (i7-7700K). Generally, not much of a gain for 6 or 7 years like I hoped. I was waiting to see what AMD did with Ryzen, and while impressive on the workstation level, I think the platform needs to mature. I may build an 1700 down the line when it gets better BIOS/EFI, memory support, and other tweaks. I think it will come.

Even though I am not jumping at Ryzen (yet), I am quite excited at what it brings to the table for home users and content creators on a budget (those, like me, that also work a day job).


#14

I have changed to maybe upgrading one or two socket 1151 computers to Kaby Lake CPUs for the 4k hardware encoding ability but any builds from scratch will likely be based on Ryzen CPUs. That is unless Intel guts their prices to compete head to head on price versus performance. Even then I will likely go with AMD to reward them for bringing back competition in the CPU market.


#15

The only thing I do that stresses my computer in the slightest is video encoding, which benefits from extra cores, so Ryzen is more attractive in price/performance right now.

Not that I’m planning on building a new computer any time soon. My five year old build is chugging along just fine and I doubt I work with more than one Blu-ray a month these days. That’s no incentive for upgrading.


#16

I have an i7-3770K overclocked to 4.5 ghz in my main work computer that will serve me fine for just about as many years as it can keep chugging along. In fact, most of the Intel third gen computers I have are more than sufficient in performance for the foreseeable future.


#17

To be honest I might go with the 10nm Cannon Lake CPU , due in the last half of 2017. I will have to see an Myce review first.


#18

I will be waiting to see what the Intel LGA 2066 platform brings to the table.
AMD RyZen CPU’s look great, but the motherboard chipsets let the platform down, IMO.


#19

I think the Ryzen 5 series CPUs are going to be the ones that hit Intel the worst. They are six core/twelve thread and four core/eight thread CPUs very price competitive with Intel’s i5 series. I think the Ryzen 3 series just might be the end of the i3 series or force it into the bottom tier of Intel’s CPU line.

Plus, all Ryzen CPUs so far are unlocked and don’t require an expensive motherboard to overclock them. IMO, AMD has changed the landscape of CPU price for performance. Intel will have to react to this or AMD will steal a lot of market share from them.


#20

I decided to make the leap to Kaby Lake as my 8-year-old build started giving stability issues.

Unlike previous builds, this time I decided to buy a HP Z240 workstation, my first ever desktop PC purchase. My workplace has been using HP PCs over the past 10 years and they have been very reliable and quiet running. I was getting very close to buying a slimline PC (that goes under the monitor), but in the end chose a full size tower.

The Z240 series is the HP entry level range, but more than adequate for my needs. The configuration I chose has an Intel i7 7700K, 16GB RAM, 256GB SSD, a 4TB hard disk and Windows 10 Pro. Its PCI3 Expansion bays include 2 x16 bays (1 x4 mode), 1 x4, 1 x1 and 1 M.2 (x4 mode). Back interfaces include 4x USB3, 2x USB2, 2x DisplayPort and 1x DVI-D. Personally, I would have liked more USB slots on the back as I have all 6 used, then again a lot of PCs surprisingly still come with just 2 USB3 slots, e.g. most Fujitsu models. On the front, it has 2x USB3, 2x USB2, SD (UHS-II) reader, headphones & mic and surprisingly, a laptop-style DVDRW drive. It also has 2 unused 5.25” bays, so I’ll likely get an M-Disc capable BD drive later.

My first impression of turning it on was reaching back down to turn it on again! I cannot hear it without putting my head to the rear of it. So far I haven’t heard any fan sound, even throughout the Windows Creators Update. Of course, I’ve yet to try some video encoding… :wink: One thing I always liked about most branded PCs is the POST time. This PC is no exception and it appears to fully boot to the desktop quicker than what my old Gigabyte board took to complete the POST stage.

As this is a business grade PC, it comes with minimal software, i.e. Windows 10 Pro with drivers preinstalled and a HP recovery tool. There’s no other non-Windows software or bloat that I can see. With what looks like a clean Windows installation, I decided not to do my own clean installation.

My old PC it replaced was built mid-2009. It has a Core i5 750, Gigabyte (GA-P55A-UD3P I think), 12GB RAM, a SanDisk Ultra II 480GB SSD and 4 hard disks (1TB, 2x2TB and 3TB). It has been my longest lasting build to date and I probably would have continued using it another year or two had it remained stable. Over the past few months, it started giving stability issues with its interfaces. Every day or two, a USB port would randomly drop out, so an external HDD, Wi-Fi, etc. would randomly cut out. Even the on-board Ethernet port randomly dropped out. Sometimes even a reboot didn’t re-enable all the ports or resulted in another port not working.

It will interesting to see whether this one lasts another 8 years… :slight_smile: