AnyDVD’s lead developer doesn’t rule out he’ll crack the AACS 2.0 protection of Ultra HD Blu-ray’s

vbimport

#1

We’ve just posted the following news: AnyDVD’s lead developer doesn’t rule out he’ll crack the AACS 2.0 protection of Ultra HD Blu-ray’s[newsimage]http://www.myce.com/wp-content/images_posts/2016/02/myce-redfox-forum-95x75.png[/newsimage]

In an interview with Myce, the lead developer of AnyDVD doesn’t rule out he will be able to crack the AACS 2.0 protection used on Ultra HD Blu-ray discs. He also has good news for recent lifetime license purchasers and he provides a little more information on his idea of making a ‘decryption box’.

            Read the full article here: [http://www.myce.com/news/anydvd-lead-developer-doesnt-rule-out-he-will-crack-aacs-2-0-78721/](http://www.myce.com/news/anydvd-lead-developer-doesnt-rule-out-he-will-crack-aacs-2-0-78721/)

            Please note that the reactions from the complete site will be synched below.

#2

He should and he should be allowed to under U.S. law. Fair use doctrine > DMCA. I say if you legally purchased a retail copy of whatever copyrighted work, you should be able to crack any copyright protections to make a fair use backup. In a representative republic, isn’t my voice as a voter supposed to be heard? Instead, Hollywood just bribes these guys to pass laws which favor them so they can continue their monopoly. I don’t see how my wanting to fairly use the disc I paid for digs into their profits. They should go after the people who are redistributing it to other people via torrents or whatever.


#3

[QUOTE=hogger129;2769221]He should and he should be allowed to under U.S. law. Fair use doctrine > DMCA. I say if you legally purchased a retail copy of whatever copyrighted work, you should be able to crack any copyright protections to make a fair use backup. In a representative republic, isn’t my voice as a voter supposed to be heard? Instead, Hollywood just bribes these guys to pass laws which favor them so they can continue their monopoly. I don’t see how my wanting to fairly use the disc I paid for digs into their profits. They should go after the people who are redistributing it to other people via torrents or whatever.[/QUOTE]
They talk about Fair Use…until they have to face it then they use DMCA rules…so the rule only is for them not US…

In an interview with Myce, the lead developer of AnyDVD doesn’t rule out he will be able to crack the AACS 2.0 protection used on Ultra HD Blu-ray discs. He also has good news for recent lifetime license purchasers and he provides a little more information on his idea of making a ‘decryption box’.
Good news to hear…a poke into the DMCA eyes… lol…

Now just have to wait for the news of update to AnyDVD HD.


#4

I need AnyDVD for one simple reason: Region locking.

Region locking was once important to Hollywood studios to prevent foreign consumers from viewing North American home video cassettes before the films completed their foreign theatrical runs, as it often took months or even years for a Hollywood film to officially reach the foreign market, delayed either by translation efforts, or the studios just being jerks and making the British wait longer. This was passively accomplished as a natural consequence of countries using different electrical currents and consequently utilizing different electronic signals, namely NTSC, PAL, and SECOM. Universal players that would convert the video to the correct signal were rare and pricey, not to mention that globalized commerce on a consumer level was uncommon, so it was difficult for typical consumers to circumvent the studios’ release schedules.

In this modern digital age however, hardware’s electronic signals are no longer a barrier to “incompatible” picture formats: All formats of a given medium, e.g. DVD, are fundamentally identical, with the only real difference being how many pixels are in a frame and how frequently to cycle to the next frame. A player that can play back both NTSC and PAL to an NTSC television is relatively easy to manufacture without having to gauge the consumer’s wallet, not to mention that almost every home in first-world countries has a powerful personal computer capable of handling and displaying videos of virtually any digital format.

Therefore, the studios had to impose an active region lock in order to enforce their controlled distribution of home videos, and the vile DVD region lock was born, which then continued with the Blu-Ray region lock.

But do they really need to lock regions any more in this globalized economy? I remember years ago when one of the last Harry Potter films came out on home video, and the Region 3 Hong Kong DVD was released just a few days before the Region 1 North America release. Star Wars: The Force Awakens started playing in theaters on the SAME DAY in both North America and Japan, but you can bet the home videos will be region-locked.

Why this matters to me, while it probably doesn’t matter to most other Americans:

  1. Why must I limit myself to ONLY the films that Hollywood produces, and the small handful of foreign films that are half-heartedly imported, when there are literally THOUSANDS of excellent foreign films which will never be officially imported on Region 1 DVD or Region A Blu-ray? Instead the “foreign film” sections are flooded with cheap-to-import crap so boring that it makes watching paint dry exciting. The only alternative is to buy bootlegs off of eBay, which I have taken a great effort to avoid doing.

I have purchased several legitimate non-Region-1 DVDs and non-Region-A Blu-rays for films which have never seen an official North American release.

  1. Languages is a hobby of mine. Watching foreign-language films is a fantastic way to help learn a language, and so is watching a familiar film, originally recorded in your mother tongue, dubbed in another language. If I were only interested in learning French and Spanish I could be quite content with North American DVDs (alternate audio tracks), but anybody wishing to listen to any other language is going to have a very small selection to choose from.

I have purchased several legitimate foreign DVDs and Blu-rays of American films so that I could watch them in alternate languages.

  1. Being able to purchase from other markets gives me access to potentially superior versions not normally available to me. In an ideal world, all DVDs/Blu-rays would have the same content and special features, but in reality they don’t. Sometimes one release has a poor digital transfer while another market’s release is superb. One release will have just stereo while another will have other sound options. Sometimes the foreign interface is just better: A lot of my Japanese DVDs start the movie immediately without making me wait through unskippable copyright warnings, annoying advertisements, and stupid animated menus.

Yes, I am aware of region-free players and have a region-free Blu-ray player, but sometimes I want to watch a foreign movie while sitting at my computer desk. When I used to commute 100 miles and frequently worked late at the office, it was nice being able to watch a movie while I ate my dinner at my workdesk.


#5

I’m sure it will be cracked or bypassed sooner or later. But if not, there’s [I]always[/I] a way. Ciphers/encryption buy time, not absolute secrecy. :iagree:

One method springs to mind which may work if there is a TV or monitor which supports HDCP 2.2 and uses an eDP panel. Add a couple of commercially available adapters…
[Edit: Even an LVDS panel TV/monitor may be possible, still using current commercially available parts.]

The result wouldn’t be lossless, as the video is captured after decompression. But it could potentially give results as good as re-coding the actual disc contents.

Of course this would be much more trouble than just using AnyDVD HD, and so the encryption would successfully deter the ordinary customer with an original, legally-purchased disc they would like to watch on another device.

However it certainly wouldn’t deter the pirates, who willingly sit and hold a camcorder in a cinema for 3 hours if that’s what it takes!

So why go after your most loyal, legitimate customers so agressively? Surely it will only encourage them to turn to piracy? :confused:


#6

[QUOTE=Ibex;2769525]I’m sure it will be cracked or bypassed sooner or later. But if not, there’s [I]always[/I] a way. Ciphers/encryption buy time, not absolute secrecy. :iagree:[/QUOTE]In due time… it will break and then they cry fowl…

[QUOTE=Ibex;2769525]However it certainly wouldn’t deter the pirates, who willingly sit and hold a camcorder in a cinema for 3 hours if that’s what it takes![/QUOTE]Anyone watching this should be wipped with wet noodle they are so bad…

[QUOTE=Ibex;2769525]So why go after your most loyal, legitimate customers so agressively? Surely it will only encourage them to turn to piracy? :confused:[/QUOTE]They could care less…


#7

[QUOTE=coolcolors;2769540]
Anyone watching this should be wipped with wet noodle they are so bad…
[/QUOTE]
:clap::clap::clap::clap::bigsmile:


#8

We’re not talking about a classified military cypher system, used for transmissions from certain locations to recipients in possession of one of a limited number of closely guarded decryption boxes. Both the encrypted content and the decoders are being mass distributed to the public. Anyone can buy a bunch of Ultra HD bluray players to take apart and reverse engineer. Anyone with the right equipment can analyze the discs and their content. The sort of people who will take on the challenge of cracking AACS 2.0 are likely to be even smarter than the ones who created it. For the studios to win, the crackers need to fail every single time. For us to win, they only need to succeed once. It will inevitably happen. Just a question of when.


#9

[QUOTE=ecortez;2775899]We’re not talking about a classified military cypher system, used for transmissions from certain locations to recipients in possession of one of a limited number of closely guarded decryption boxes. Both the encrypted content and the decoders are being mass distributed to the public. Anyone can buy a bunch of Ultra HD bluray players to take apart and reverse engineer. Anyone with the right equipment can analyze the discs and their content. The sort of people who will take on the challenge of cracking AACS 2.0 are likely to be even smarter than the ones who created it. For the studios to win, the crackers need to fail every single time. For us to win, they only need to succeed once. It will inevitably happen. Just a question of when.[/QUOTE]
Truth, nothing but :flower:

Spend six months to a year creating a protection scheme, it will take a seasoned hacker/cracker less than six days to crack it. A protector’s worst nightmare is his own code which he one way or the other will have to give us, there’s no escape.