Any unequivocal advice on formatting flash for system backup?

vbimport

#1

I’ve got another thread here discussing harddrive backup/cloning/mirroring. I hope I can get some concrete clarity here on a few things that I’m finding conflicting info on across the web.

First of all is there anything inherently bad about saving a 9gb backup file to a 16gb usb flash drive? I keep getting “it’s a bad idea” without any real substantiation. Modern USB “sticks” are a generally reliable storage media for static file over the ‘short’ term (talking less than a year for my needs in this case).

Secondly, format in FAT32 or NTSF? Wow is there a lot of loose opinion about the web on this one. At the Acronis forum and elsewhere I’m advised to format NTSF for anything over 4gb. It’s even repeated often in google searches on the subject that this is the limit. Yet I’ve successfully stored and recovered an 8gb backup on a FAT32 formatted drive and even a few members at the Acronis forum recommend FAT32 instead of NTFS.

Are there any unequivocal facts that apply here?


#2

[QUOTE=svejkovat;2652879]

Secondly, format in FAT32 or [B]NTSF[/B]? Wow is there a lot of loose opinion about the web on this one. At the Acronis forum and elsewhere I’m advised to format [B]NTSF[/B] for anything over 4gb. It’s even repeated often in google searches on the subject that this is the limit. Yet I’ve successfully stored and recovered an 8gb backup on a FAT32 formatted drive and even a few members at the Acronis forum recommend FAT32 instead of NTFS.

Are there any unequivocal facts that apply here?[/QUOTE]

Doubtless NTFS in this case.


#3

If you need to save a file of 4 GB or larger, you cannot do this on a FAT32 filesystem, but you can on an NTFS filesystem.

Acronis will, however, automatically split an archive over multiple files as needed by the filesystem (or you can set it to do so manually).

If you only need to use your flash stick for Acronis backups, I would personally use the FAT32 filesystem on the stick and let Acronis handle splitting automatically.

NTFS works on flash sticks, but sometimes Windows will stubbornly refuse to eject an external NTFS drive, and this is in my experience less likely with FAT32.


#4

As in the guide .PDF I posted a link to in the other thread . I have a USB external harddrive set up as in the guide . It is actually set up a bit more complex but that would not have been necessary .
The "Acronis Recovery Partition " on this drive is FAT32 & only 33.7 MB of which only 14.8 MB is used. So very small . The partition I keep the backups on is NTFS & 368 GB .
I also keep other files I want to have on it too. My usual backup image file is 28 GB & I keep 3 most of the time as well as an alternating one on another USB external . The second USB external doesnt have the “boot” on it but I’ve never had to use it for a backup. It is just in case of a harddrive failure of the first one.

I haven tried it on a flash drive but I think you would partition it with a small FAT32 for the "Acronis Recovery Partition " & NTFS for the second partition.
I don’t have any flashdrives larger than 4GB so I can’t test this . If I need large portability I have a small Samsung 250GB hard drive that meets this need.


#5

Check out wikipedia on filesystem limits. On Windows exFAT would be okay since it allows large files, else NTFS. It is more error resilient than FAT32 and with recent Linux versions you can read/write it nowadays.


#6

[QUOTE=svejkovat;2652879]I’ve got another thread here discussing harddrive backup/cloning/mirroring. I hope I can get some concrete clarity here on a few things that I’m finding conflicting info on across the web.

First of all is there anything inherently bad about saving a 9gb backup file to a 16gb usb flash drive? I keep getting “it’s a bad idea” without any real substantiation. Modern USB “sticks” are a generally reliable storage media for static file over the ‘short’ term (talking less than a year for my needs in this case).

Are there any unequivocal facts that apply here?[/QUOTE]

I do use Flash Drives to Double Back-up important Data. I’m from the Old School, and believe in only Backing up your Data. If your C: fails, you buy a new one reload your OS, Programs, and Data and you are back in Business. I have worked on many failed Systems, and this method works every time. No Smoke and Mirrors, just basic stuff. :cool: