Any member use Pioneer 203 in conjunction w/ Sony BD-R Media?

w/ so many pioneer 203 owners in this forum, has any1 of you use the sony to burn a BD-R? IF so, compatible or not?

I have. I just started burning with it so I haven’t put any results up yet. I used Sony 4x media and a 2x BD-RE and it worked fine. It even said it would burn the 4x media at 6x/8x if I wanted.

thanks for the info. For your info., don’t burn your disc higher than the rated speed. In fact, to get a proper burn of binary 1, do it 1 speed lower. So if your disc media is rated 2X, do the burn at 1x.

[quote=happy hopping;2238968]For your info., don’t burn your disc higher than the rated speed. In fact, to get a proper burn of binary 1, do it 1 speed lower. So if your disc media is rated 2X, do the burn at 1x.[/quote]Sorry this is partially incorrect for today’s modern drives and media.

A burn speed higher than the rated speed can also get good or better result, especially if the drive’s firmware is optimized and the media quality is very good. We have seen numerous tests done by members particularly in the DVD burner section and Blank Media forum.

However, burning at many times higher than rated speed, for example 8x rated DVD-R burn at 20x or 24x, the outcome might be worst than burning at rated speed, although it is possible that the result is still within standard of a good burn.

As for this Pioneer BDR-203, you can’t burn BD-R/RE lower than 2x, in other words, you can’t burn at 1x as you suggested above.

Disks do not stay in the same state as they are when written.
They change through time and the data can become misrepresented causing errors or becoming unreadable.

A binary 1 is written to a disk by burning a hole in the media with a laser.
This hole needs to be big enough to be read without error.
Also the timing of when the burn occurs is crucial as even a small error can cause the burn to skip half a bit and affect neighboring data.

Each disk is rated to account for the power of the writing laser and the speed a good write can be made.
It takes a small amount of time for the laser to burn through the media so its critical that the laser is applied long enough to burn through the media.
Spinning the disk faster while writing means that the laser cannot be on for as long and subsequently there is a chance that a write will burn a smaller hole and perhaps not even register as a binary 1.

A certain number of errors can be tolerated before a disk becomes unreadable.
As disks age, they get scratched and the media also degrades such that some more data becomes unreadable.
Once past a threshold of errors the disk will become unreadable, so the less errors you introduce, the longer the disk will last.

Therefore its a good idea to burn at a speed the disks are rated at or slower.

See, some1 wrote the above. And it looks very convincing. I used to burn DVD+R, say rated 16X disc to 20X, but since the above surface, I have been burning DVD+R at a lower speed than the rated speed

HAH?? Where in the world you get this info: “to get a proper burn of binary 1, do it 1 speed lower”??? — Due to “binary 1” we burn “1 speed lower”??

“So if your disc media is rated 2X, do the burn at 1x.” — So if DVD media rated at 16x, we should burn at 15x? Do you know Pioneer 203 when burning DVD at 16x will start at 6x and increases the speed slowly up until 16x at end of disc? Do you even know there is no 15x writing strategy in the firmware for DVD, nor 1x writing strategy for BD burner???

It does look convincing if you now little. Look like a machine translation from a “source”.
“A binary 1 is written to a disk by burning a hole in the media with a laser.” —> As in digging a hole and put number “1” into the hole? Funny! Do you know “binary” consists of 0 and 1? Where do you burn number “0”?

Dude, seriously, Google for pits and land. Then head over to blank media section here, search PI/PO error scan.

Always include the source of the “quote”. Even from [H]ard|Forum.