Antipiracy DNS blacklist bill passes the Senate Judiciary Committee

Antipiracy DNS blacklist bill passes the Senate Judiciary Committee.

[newsimage]http://static.rankone.nl/images_posts/2010/11/wmr4F2.jpg[/newsimage]A bill that will allow the US government to force internet service providers to block websites accused of illegal file sharing was passed the Senate Judiciary Committee Thursday morning by a unanimous vote.


Read the full article here: [http://www.myce.com/news/antipiracy-dns-blacklist-bill-passes-through-senate-judiciary-committee-36777/](http://www.myce.com/news/antipiracy-dns-blacklist-bill-passes-through-senate-judiciary-committee-36777/)


Please note that the reactions from the complete site will be synched below.

So … how many civil liberties violations are required before a corporation is declared an enemy of the state?

This bill is another nail in the coffin of Fair Use. It has the potential to block far more than file-sharing sites. The measure is in my opinion the first step down a slippery slope towards censorship of internet content and has only weak due process provisions. US citizens concerned with issues of prior restraint and individual liberty should contact their Senators and Representatives and ask them to help stop S.3804.

[QUOTE=debro;2558251]So … how many civil liberties violations are required before a corporation is declared an enemy of the state?[/QUOTE]And how many before the State is the enemy of the people?

Welcome to the United fascist States of Amerika. First the Dept of Homeland Security and their lackeys the TSA legally aloud to sexually molest you and now gov ruled by the MPAA, RIAA and now big business…

I wonder how this DNS blacklist will be enforced, as there are two main problems I see with this:

  1. If only the DNS is blocked, there is little stopping the end user from changing to an alternative DNS provider such as OpenDNS or another freely available public DNS provider.

  2. If the associated IP address is also blocked to prevent users using a 3rd party DNS provider, this would have a major impact on shared hosting providers, where a very large number of websites have the same IP address, e.g. SiteGround. For example, if a blacklisted DNS results in the IP of a shared host being blocked, that could knock the websites of businesses offline who also use that same hosting provider.

[QUOTE=debro;2558251]So … how many civil liberties violations are required before a corporation is declared an enemy of the state?[/QUOTE]

Corporations run the state, that would be like becoming an enemy of yourself.

This is gonna be fun with ipv6

Actually it was crushed last minute! so Victory!

Yesterday the Senate Judiciary Committee voted unanimously to send the Internet blacklist bill to the full Senate, but it was quickly stopped by Sen. Ron Wyden (D-OR) who denounced it as “a bunker-buster cluster bomb” aimed at the Internet and pledged to “do everything I can to take the necessary steps to stop it from passing the U.S. Senate.”

Wyden’s opposition practically guarantees the bill is dead this year – and next year the new Congress will have to reintroduce the bill and start all over again. But even that might not happen: Dianne Feinstein (D-CA), Hollywood’s own senator, told the committee that even she was uncomfortable with the Internet censorship portion of the bill and hoped it could be removed when they took it up again next year!

Sorry, but how exactly does this proposal protect free speech? If anything, it squashes it!

Censorship of ANY kind is bad–first IP addresses, then what? People’s computers being spied upon? Government agencies taking a peek into your online activities? Where does it stop?

And who exactly is going to select which sites are actively participating? Are they going to remove all content or just certain one? I can name 50 sites right off hand that let you download material that the artists themselves put out there–who’s going to ensure that something like this doesn’t get caught up in this mess?

Welcome to the U.S.S.R circa 2010

[QUOTE=Chimera1970;2558487]Sorry, but how exactly does this proposal protect free speech? If anything, it squashes it![/quote] Nothing new compared to earliers laws and bills.

Censorship of ANY kind is bad–first IP addresses, then what? People’s computers being spied upon? Government agencies taking a peek into your online activities? Where does it stop?
It does not stop. May i recommend reading this book?

And who exactly is going to select which sites are actively participating?
A club of wise men.

who’s going to ensure that something like this doesn’t get caught up in this mess?
The greater good for humanity is far more important than a few of earth’s inhabitants.