Another photoshop question

How do I add a second layer of a totally different picture to the one I am working on?

I know how to do a duplicate layer, but how do I add a second layer that is a different picture?

I am using CS3.

Sorry, don’t use CS3. But in PS7, when you add a new layer, there are 4 or 5 different options to select for the type of layer you want to add. There is New Layer, Layer as Copy, Duplicate layer, etc…

I can add a duplicate layer, and I can now add a second picture as a layer, but when I try to cut out the background of the 2nd picture I cant user the eraser or the history brush. When I do i see the 1st picture.

with photoshop you have to have the layer you want to work on selected in the layers pallet, alternately some tools have a “sample all layers” option in the top menu bar so you can make changes on a blank layer and preserve the original image

[QUOTE=Jack Hass;1945465]I can add a duplicate layer, and I can now add a second picture as a layer, but when I try to cut out the background of the 2nd picture I cant user the eraser or the history brush. When I do i see the 1st picture.[/QUOTE]

Not quite clear on what you’re trying to do, but you can hide the 1st layer (usually called the background layer) and just work on the second layer alone.
In Photoshop, all the layers will become transparent when you use the eraser tool etc - so you will always be able to see the 1st layer (background).
You can choose to have a transparent background layer, or to change the order of the layers etc if you want to change that,

If you want to make a selection and move it into a different picture entirely, you can copy it to a new layer, then blank out all the other layers from view.
Use the regular lasso tool to select the picture portion in the new layer, then use the move tool to drag the selection into a totally different picture - or use the cut / copy and paste tool to put it into a new layer in the different picture.

But - remember that the resolution of the 2 pictures you are going to use must be the same, otherwise you will get perceived size changes of the pictures.
If this is a problem, try resampling one of the pictures first.

Jack,
Just a little advice. If you are fairly new to photoshop, I highly suggest you google “Photoshop tutorial”, and spend hundreds of hours going over and over the tutorials. Photoshop is extremely powerful software, and it is also very complex. When I was starting out with it, I struggled for days and days on just one photo. That was when I decided to check out the tutorials. Now, I can do some pretty complex stuff, in a very short time. You will never regret the time you spend on the tutorials.

Very [B]GOOD[/B] advice! Not only with photoshop but with any software :slight_smile:

I agree :iagree:
PS CS3 is so complex that you have to get a lot of basic techniques down to be able to work on pictures and not spend days doing it.

I have a couple of books on it, but also attended a week long training course last year - and learned more from that than I even would have by a year of messing about on my own.