Android vulnerability abused to infect smart TVs from Sharp, Philips and Panasonic

vbimport

#1

We’ve just posted the following news: Android vulnerability abused to infect smart TVs from Sharp, Philips and Panasonic[newsimage]http://static.myce.com//images_posts/2016/01/smart-tv-1-95x75.png[/newsimage]

Security researchers have discovered Android malware that tries to infect smart TVs. The malware abuses an old leak that exists in versions prior to Android 5.0 Lollipop.

            Read the full article here: [http://www.myce.com/news/android-vulnerability-abused-to-infect-smart-tvs-from-sharp-philips-and-panasonic-78319/](http://www.myce.com/news/android-vulnerability-abused-to-infect-smart-tvs-from-sharp-philips-and-panasonic-78319/)

            Please note that the reactions from the complete site will be synched below.

#2

Not too many years ago, we retired the Sony black trinitron CRT TV as it had exceptionally good sound and in all fairness the picture was not bad.

O.k. I installed a 1080p back-lit LED TV and the first evening my wife sat down to watch, she complaint about the time it took to turn on the TV.
I laughed and told her that we had no TV anymore. We had a computer specially designed to show television signals on the screen and that she would have to wait until it had finished booting before the signal would show on the screen.

I think that many still think of their TV the way my wife still do, and in that context, they fail to update and even for those who do, there comes a time when the OS is not updated anymore.
After that, if you use use your TV online and a vulnerability gets known/exploited, you have to decide if you want to buy a new TV scheduled and controlled or feel lucky and wait until you possibly get hit by the malware.
In my home, only my wife watch TV and it is not connected to the net apart from when I update the software and so we are pretty safe from vulnerabilities.

More and more equipment change from being just dummy electronics to become computers, devices like your fridge and so on… I think we, as consumers, in the future should stop and think about each device, if we really need it to be smart. If we answer yes to that question, we do at the same time unknowingly answer yes to the potential of the device getting vulnerable to malware.

I did read a book on the subject of the internet of things (IOT) this autumn and how easy it in reality is to exploit the devices. While not going into the details, I must add that the information was troublesome. Based on the information, I am concerned about the future based on my knowledge as to just how little people care about their security today. If that trend continues, I can already predict doom for you as a knowledgeable can probably take over your whole house and turn your life into a living hell… What do you do when everything around you are infected and run by an irritated neighbor?

A little off topic to bring up the entire problematic field, but I am not seeking to bring it up for discussion in this thread. Rather, I wanted to mention it to you as I can already see it in my ‘crystal ball’ - Here’s hoping for the future :flower:


#3

Hmmm… I bought a Sony TV not that long ago. I wonder if it’s affected?

I must have a look tonight and see if I can find out which version of Android it’s using.

It does auto update over the air though and there have been several system updates since I bought it a few months ago so perhaps I’m okay.

I read an article on IOT devices and it was very interesting. Some of these things I have to wonder about though as to whether they even need to be connected at all as the benefit either seems very limited or a bit gimmicky.

[B]Wombler[/B]


#4

I’m might proud to say that my TVs are not connected to the internet. I just have my computers and my phone. Therefore, I don’t have to worry about internet attackers taking over my fridge or my laundry machine. If they want to gain unauthorized access to my VCR or my CRT, they’ll have to break into my house, just like in the old days.