American Consumer Affairs flooded with complaints about overcharging McAfee and Symantec

vbimport

#1

We’ve just posted the following news: American Consumer Affairs flooded with complaints about overcharging McAfee and Symantec[newsimage]http://static.myce.com//images_posts/2012/09/Norton.jpg[/newsimage]

The website of the American consumer organisation Consumer Affairs is flooded with complaints of consumers about paid antivirus software and the helpdesk of antivirus companies. The complaints mainly target Symantec and McAfee.

            Read the full article here: [http://www.myce.com/news/american-consumer-affairs-flooded-with-complaints-about-overcharging-mcafee-and-symantec-78291/](http://www.myce.com/news/american-consumer-affairs-flooded-with-complaints-about-overcharging-mcafee-and-symantec-78291/)

            Please note that the reactions from the complete site will be synched below.

#2

Consumers mainly complain about recurring subscriptions, the inability of properly detecting malware and the helpdesk for the technical questions.
Why am I not surprised…

The reports were discovered by the website Democrat Gazette which also notes that some reports might be fake, or that users called phone numbers that belong to scammers.
Fake/Scammers - truth be told - these two companies Symantec and McAfee should’ve have been up and forefront about fixing this instead of trying to hide it. This only tells me they could care less about fixing the problem. I been use MSE for Windows 7 and older O/S and have no problem like what they are having here.


#3

Its actually very funny, because I use Eset Smart Security, I have used it for a good long time. My internet provider , provides McAfee for free for as many computers as I have in my home. But I just do not like it, so much so I would pay for Eset in 2 year licenses, when you have 5 rigs in the home, its actually pretty cheap, they have a 50% discount now. I paid 54USD for a 5 computer 2 year license, that less than 5.00 a year per PC. I admit it may not be rated the best. But I do not get viruses because I have learned the correct ways to surf the internet, where to go and where not to go. What to look for and what not to do. I am sure I do not know all the tricks but enough to stay relatively safe. So when I read that the American Consumer Affairs are flooded with complaints about McAfee I don’t feel so bad about not taking advantage of my free offer from my internet provider. LOL.


#4

[QUOTE=coolcolors;2766132]Why am I not surprised…
[/QUOTE]
There has to be a surprise first :bigsmile:

[QUOTE=coolcolors;2766132] Fake/Scammers - truth be told - these two companies Symantec and McAfee should’ve have been up and forefront about fixing this instead of trying to hide it. This only tells me they could care less about fixing the problem. I been use MSE for Windows 7 and older O/S and have no problem like what they are having here.[/QUOTE]

You got me lined up with you here. It would be refreshing if they started to care about viruses as well, not just money…
Like you I use MSE… I ported ForFront endpoint security (MSE equivalent for the Business) to Windows 10 (reinstated from windows.old after upgrade).
This is by far a good enough engine. It is light on resources and works, what more can you ask for?
Way better than the above, Symantec moves too slow, and McAfee… I think I should restrict myself from commenting.


#5

[QUOTE=alan1476;2766145]Its actually very funny, because I use Eset Smart Security, I have used it for a good long time. My internet provider , provides McAfee for free for as many computers as I have in my home. But I just do not like it, so much so I would pay for Eset in 2 year licenses, when you have 5 rigs in the home, its actually pretty cheap, they have a 50% discount now. I paid 54USD for a 5 computer 2 year license, that less than 5.00 a year per PC. I admit it may not be rated the best. But I do not get viruses because I have learned the correct ways to surf the internet, where to go and where not to go. What to look for and what not to do. I am sure I do not know all the tricks but enough to stay relatively safe. So when I read that the American Consumer Affairs are flooded with complaints about McAfee I don’t feel so bad about not taking advantage of my free offer from my internet provider. LOL.[/QUOTE]

You could do a lot worse. That is in fact not a bad choice at all if spending money… One of the apps I have found to actually work in a day to day situation. . . . and do not think so much about ratings, I find them to be rather worthless.
You use another defense too it seems which is worth much more, common sense combined with a little scepticism and self-imposed restrictions.

I am all over at all times, even places where I know malware is present (I love to see them bash into the sandbox (it can not be jumped as there is no place to jump) while I analyze their attack, then again, I am a little crazy)
Naturally, I do not rely on just one security application but have one for each attack type. Then I have a few tweaks of my own to make sure.
Ultimately, even I anchor it all in common sense, scepticism and self-imposed restrictions (7 day quarantine-time for all downloads unless I have the time to dissect.)
Like I have said before, the interest rate on trust is too low out here… and if I send you a file, check it! I can only guarantee that I did not find any virus on my end… there is no distrust in that, it would actually please me if you do.


#6

I personally like Comodo, as you don’t have to pay huge piles of money for a good A/V. It routinely scores better than MS Security Essentials, and has decent sandboxing, which can help prevent malware from infecting your computer in the first place. IMHO, their rescue disc is to die for, even if it uses a rather old version of the Linux kernel (old kernel=old drivers and/or lack of drivers). That way, when malicious programs install malicious drivers into the Windows kernel (preventing Windows from detecting the malware), the malware can still be located and removed.


#7

[QUOTE=TSJnachos117;2766251]I personally like Comodo, as you don’t have to pay huge piles of money for a good A/V. It routinely scores better than MS Security Essentials, and has decent sandboxing, which can help prevent malware from infecting your computer in the first place.[/QUOTE]Well MSE works well for alot of people so far and MSE doesn’t require a yearly payment to use it when you have Windows it’s Free - can’t get any cheaper then that and setup is easier then most would think.

[QUOTE=TSJnachos117;2766251]IMHO, their rescue disc is to die for, even if it uses a rather old version of the Linux kernel (old kernel=old drivers and/or lack of drivers).[/QUOTE]For that I would use the Factory Computer Windows REcovery media or Windows created Backup restore disk that will restore far better and insure all programs are in their proper restore.

[QUOTE=TSJnachos117;2766251]That way, when malicious programs install malicious drivers into the Windows kernel (preventing Windows from detecting the malware), the malware can still be located and removed.[/QUOTE]Well why don’t you just make a Windows “User” Account that will prevent malware/virus from installing? This is what people forget your first account is a “Admin” account but creating a “User” account doesn’t allow installs will further protect your Windows Sys files. And using the "User’ account will further protect your system should it get infected just wipe clean that account and recreate the “User” account again and continue using. At least in the “Admin” account you can copy your data from the “User” account and save it and then restore it back to the New “User” account and keep right on going. And infection will be limited to only the “User” account and will require “Admin” password to do any installs. This further insures that unless you know how to install the software or what the software is will make you stop to ask what is it trying to do or what are you installing. It’s not like in the days of XP where everyone was either “Admin” or “limited users” this made protection worse until Vista came around could you separate “Admin” and “User” account where only if you have the Admin password could a User install software but only Admin can Add or Remove accounts. Users should read up on this to further protect their Windows functions. This will go a long way to fix common infection problems.


#8

[QUOTE=coolcolors;2766273]Well why don’t you just make a Windows “User” Account that will prevent malware/virus from installing? This is what people forget your first account is a “Admin” account but creating a “User” account doesn’t allow installs will further protect your Windows Sys files. And using the "User’ account will further protect your system should it get infected just wipe clean that account and recreate the “User” account again and continue using. At least in the “Admin” account you can copy your data from the “User” account and save it and then restore it back to the New “User” account and keep right on going. And infection will be limited to only the “User” account and will require “Admin” password to do any installs. This further insures that unless you know how to install the software or what the software is will make you stop to ask what is it trying to do or what are you installing. It’s not like in the days of XP where everyone was either “Admin” or “limited users” this made protection worse until Vista came around could you separate “Admin” and “User” account where only if you have the Admin password could a User install software but only Admin can Add or Remove accounts. Users should read up on this to further protect their Windows functions. This will go a long way to fix common infection problems.[/QUOTE]
I recognize the fact that you are aware of just how right you are here, if only the rest of the world knew…:bow:


#9

[QUOTE=Xercus;2766282]I recognize the fact that you are aware of just how right you are here, if only the rest of the world knew…:bow:[/QUOTE]
It’s a slog fest trying to get people to look outside the box. This is what I did to my family computers so that they stop infecting their computers. My brother’s family has 6 laptops and when infected you can guess how fun that it is to clean. A few of them I had to totally wipe clean and reinstall. And this time I told them there are two accounts Admin and User - Never USE the Admin account just the User account to do your everyday business and if you need to install legit software then use the Admin account or if there are Windows Update or Software update then use it but beyond that don’t use the Admin account when you login to the computer to use. If Enduser do this they will eliminate alot of infections fairly quickly.


#10

[QUOTE=coolcolors;2766289]It’s a slog fest trying to get people to look outside the box. This is what I did to my family computers so that they stop infecting their computers. My brother’s family has 6 laptops and when infected you can guess how fun that it is to clean. A few of them I had to totally wipe clean and reinstall. And this time I told them there are two accounts Admin and User - Never USE the Admin account just the User account to do your everyday business and if you need to install legit software then use the Admin account or if there are Windows Update or Software update then use it but beyond that don’t use the Admin account when you login to the computer to use. If Enduser do this they will eliminate alot of infections fairly quickly.[/QUOTE]

Spot on! My family calls me regularly about upgrades and I am only too happy to help, knowing it saves me a heck of a lot of time compared to clean malware… This is a minute, a malware is an hour, anyone can do the math on that one… I prefer to assist updating. The fun part is that they are happy as it works and indeed, they have no troubles and that rains down on me - Goes to show, whatever works :stuck_out_tongue: