All those BLABLA about versions

vbimport

#1

God, i read all this shit here now for days and days, ok someone released dvdshrink which is free and might have functions dvd2one doesn’t offer. There are several other progs now that do the same things like dvd2one, some got more features, some less. It’s the decision of the person who buys it, no matter if it’s dvd2one, ic, dvd95copy or whatever. Just one person here in the forum, i don’t remember the name said something that SHOULD make sense. IF there’s now a program than can do everything dvd2one can, FOR FREE the authors of dvd2one should really think about decisions they have to make. On thing is fact, nobody buys software if he can get the same for nothing. I don’t really understand why edwin and rene do not at least release a list of upcoming features, what is planned and so on, to hold up their customers. Don’t missunderstand me, i like dvd2one, but i think A BIT the same as the person who would like to have his money back, it’s a bit strange that there’s a prog that does all the things plus more for nothing where other people buyed dvd2one. Now i would at least like to see a dvd2one version that can do the same as a shrinkdvd, so sliders for quality and so on.


#2

i agree.

this product has entered into a phase where the MARKEING of it is almost as important as the coding.


#3

I have no probs with paying for this program…

I have tried both programs,(dvdshrink and dvd2one) and dvd2one has a SHARPER PICTURE… I look at it this way, I payed for dvd2one, it does what it is supposed to do, and awesome quality… Let’s all remember that this program was the first to come out and set the standards for all others… For this, a price had to be paid…

I feel that no matter what other programs do or don’t charge (even if they have new and more features), dvd2one will always be more focused on QUALITY not QUANITY… After all, I baught the program for DVD MOVIE ONLY… And guess what, it does that…

Keep up the good work Rene, and Erwin…

:bow: :bow:

-Chris


#4

I tried DVDShrink. Great features but the video quality at level 4 compression (to fit on one DVD) was not the quality that DVD2One is. For compression DVD software I’ve found DVD2One to do it the best!! I’m sure we will begin to see additional features and capabilities soon.


#5

You bought the program m8, the same as everyone else and you got what it said on the tin for the price advertised.

I dont see your logic ! how can you expect a refund when you received exactly what you ordered. I understand that Dvdshrink is a freebie, but that’s life surely … there will always be something better or cheaper that comes along the week after … that’s competition.

I’m sure nobody would expect a refund on their PC System, bought a month ago, simply because there is now a bigger & better system at a cheaper price.

This program might not have all the bells & whistles yet, but come on be realistic here, there have now been 2 updates and the program is very stable. Also you are entitled to free upgrades, as and when they are written. So stop moaning and be patient.


#6

Originally posted by lafjax
I tried DVDShrink. Great features but the video quality at level 4 compression (to fit on one DVD) was not the quality that DVD2One is. For compression DVD software I’ve found DVD2One to do it the best!! I’m sure we will begin to see additional features and capabilities soon.

I agree

In addition i would say “you get what you pay for”


#7

Well, after some thought about it, I have to agree with phil. Let’s see if the author of DVD2ONE can “make the customer happy”.

I just bought DVD2ONE two days ago, and about 3 hours after I bought it, I came across DVDSHRINK. Needless to say, I was pissed. DVDSHRINK seemed to do everything that DVD2ONE does with some added user control. And For FREE! I’ve burned a few from each now, and I would say that DVD2ONE has some advantage with picture quality. Does that edge justify $45.00 as opposed to free? I don’t think so at this point. But, I am willing to believe that the author of DVD2ONE will be quick about updating the product to include or surpass the features and advantages of DVDSHRINK or his brainchild will die a quick death…sales-wise.

I also believe that the author should allow free updates to those that have bought DVD2ONE until the product has close to the same features.

Question to anyone…Is there some law that prohibits decrypting or “ripping” software? Is DVDSHRINK “legal”? If so, why doesn’t DVD2ONE have the decrypting (“ripping”) program included also?

Any reply to this would be greatly appreciated


#8

Originally posted by Birnster
[B]Well, after some thought about it, I have to agree with phil. Let’s see if the author of DVD2ONE can “make the customer happy”.

I just bought DVD2ONE two days ago, and about 3 hours after I bought it, I came across DVDSHRINK. Needless to say, I was pissed. DVDSHRINK seemed to do everything that DVD2ONE does with some added user control. And For FREE! I’ve burned a few from each now, and I would say that DVD2ONE has some advantage with picture quality. Does that edge justify $45.00 as opposed to free? I don’t think so at this point. But, I am willing to believe that the author of DVD2ONE will be quick about updating the product to include or surpass the features and advantages of DVDSHRINK or his brainchild will die a quick death…sales-wise.

I also believe that the author should allow free updates to those that have bought DVD2ONE until the product has close to the same features.

Question to anyone…Is there some law that prohibits decrypting or “ripping” software? Is DVDSHRINK “legal”? If so, why doesn’t DVD2ONE have the decrypting (“ripping”) program included also?

Any reply to this would be greatly appreciated [/B]

Number 1: I’ve done 150+ backups with DVD2One in Movie-Only mode (maybe a few older Disney movies in Full-Disc mode) but I’m extremely happy… the quality is awesome and it’s easy & quick. My $45 is well spent. I would have gladly paid twice as much. With that said, I would have like to have it for free as well, but that’s life. No regrets here.

Number 2: Depending on where you live, DVD ripping/deCSS’ing software may or may not be legal. If you live in a country where the entertainment industry has the politicians as their personal latchkeys like I do (read U.S. of A), then yes, it’s illegal. Never mind consumers’ fair use.

I personally own over 300 DVD’s that I’ve bought & paid for with my hard-earned money… but no more, especially with what I’ve seen the industry doing to the consumers. Enough is enough. I’ve vowed to myself that I would never buy another DVD - that’s how you hurt them, in the wallet. After I back up my personal collection, I’m getting a Netflix account and burning new ones. Fuck the MPAA.


#9

So you guys bought a product,
it did exactly what it said it would,
at the time it was the only one that did,
so STOP moaning, and give the guys at DVD2ONE some credit, stop dissing them, I`m sure you have had your moneys worth from the product.

So theres now stuff out that does it all for free, that`s life, get over it


#10

Hey I made the purchasing decision to buy DVD2One based on what it could do not on what it could’nt do, or what it might Offer. I have no regrets. All these programs have their uses and situations where you should use them. I will still be using DVD2One, I look forward to future updates, and I will be getting my $44 out of it.


#11

Originally posted by phuocle
[B]

I personally own over 300 DVD’s that I’ve bought & paid for with my hard-earned money… but no more, especially with what I’ve seen the industry doing to the consumers. Enough is enough. I’ve vowed to myself that I would never buy another DVD - that’s how you hurt them, in the wallet. After I back up my personal collection, I’m getting a Netflix account and burning new ones. Fuck the MPAA. [/B]

I must be missing something here what exactly has the industry done to you?


#12

Scarpad, are you serious or is your response a joke?

The MPAA ensures that the consumer pays every last cent for their DVD products. The fact they are overpriced by up to 400% -Region coded so that DVD’s can be sold in different countries at different prices - Heavily protected with CGMS and FBI warnings.

The only other Firm that use these methods is the Mafia!

If prices were realistic there would be no need for copying.

Thank you Erwin for DVD2One. You have saved me a great deal of cash.:cool:


#13

Hmm Let’s see $14.99 at Target for a 2 Disk Harry Potter Set w/a Free bottle of coke… sounds like extorsion to me <g> Compare the price of a DVD to what Laserdisks used to cost… with no Extras or DTS etc…sorry don’t see it.


#14

$14.99 for Harry Potter? Lucky you. Thanks to the MPAA the same 2 disc DVD in the UK will cost you up to $40! Perhaps you can now understand the reason behind Region Coding.

Nuff said.


#15

Originally posted by menher
[B]$14.99 for Harry Potter? Lucky you. Thanks to the MPAA the same 2 disc DVD in the UK will cost you up to $40! Perhaps you can now understand the reason behind Region Coding.

Nuff said. [/B]

top man what can i say…you said it all

one point when will the movie companies finally work out that region coding on discs just dont work?
anybody out there own a dvd that cant be hacked…so what is the point…apart from some stuck up tw*t in a big office that says i have a plan(baldrick in black adder)we are going to encoded discs in to regions and make lots of cash as we can charge what we like in each region…one big flaw if its software you will hack it


#16

Originally posted by Scarpad
[B]

I must be missing something here what exactly has the industry done to you? [/B]

They’ve done plenty… not personally to me, but to consumers in general… for example, the infamous DMCA. The DMCA effectively prohibits backing up your own DVD’s since circumventing any copy protection scheme is illegal. They even went after Johansen in Norway, then 16 years old for developing software to watch his own store bought & paid for DVD’s on his Linux box. The MPAA went after him through the Norwegian’s Economic Crime Unit…

Earlier, they brought suit against the web site 2600 for publishing DeCSS… by the way, bypassing Region Coding is also a crime.

They now want a “broadcast flag” embedded in digital broadcasts and requires equipment manufacturer to make hardware check for the flag before playing it back. This means that you can’t record TV shows off the air and replay it when we’re all digital (supposed to be soon, but maybe off for a while)…

The industry also wants any device capable of playing back digital media to have copy protection hardware built in. This means computers, CD players, etc.

The list goes on and on. They’re looking after their interests and I can’t blame them, but when it starts to hurt my interests, then I get pissed.

$15 for a 2-disc set is a rip-off still… I can’t blame you for being ignorant; after all, you’ve been conditioned that this is reasonable, especially compared to Laser Discs - let’s not start on that. Raw manufacturing costs on these discs with the packaging and everything is less than $1… they’ve already recupped their capital investment in equipment for mastering, etc. so you can’t count that… take marketing & a very reasonable profit into account and I still can’t get near $15.

The industry has been hit hard in a recent judgement forcing recording companies from Capitol Records to Time Warner to Sony Music and retailers such as Tower Records and Musicland to pay almost $150 million to consumers (works out to about $20 for those who’ve signed up) for fixing the prices of music CD’s. Just do a Google search and you’ll find it - don’t take my word for it.

DVD’s aren’t any different. The RIAA and the MPAA are in the same league; it’s just that the MPAA hasn’t suffered as much as the RIAA. Whereas CD sales have dropped 7% globally in 2002, DVD sales actually grew 31%.

I’m out to hurt the MPAA, even on a small level. Do you understand now?


#17

Your Augument defiantely applies to the music Industry more than the DVD industry. And you make a good point that they would like nothing more than going to a Pay Per Use Format, Divx proved that. If you had to set a price for what the New Harry Potter should sell for I’m curious what would it be.


#18

Originally posted by Scarpad
Your Augument defiantely applies to the music Industry more than the DVD industry. And you make a good point that they would like nothing more than going to a Pay Per Use Format, Divx proved that. If you had to set a price for what the New Harry Potter should sell for I’m curious what would it be.

It applies to both - the DeCSS case is one of my biggest argument (and is strictly directed at the MPAA) that points out how overly protective they are of what they think is their turf and how they will sue to stop the consumers’ actions that they deem are harmful to them, regardless of how we feel about it.

Want another example? They’re suing 321 Studios for DVD X Copy, just because they’re afraid of the technology. They don’t want us backing up anything because they’re afraid of piracy. I don’t know how to break it to them, but piracy will always be there and it’s not the small guy piracy that they should worry about at all - go after the guys that pirate 1,000 copies at a time in Hong Kong.

As for pricing, I think a “fair price” would be between $10 - $12. A “special edition” should have a 50% premium at most. We’re pretty close in the U.S. (except for special edition pricing) with all of the discounters: Wal-Mart, Target, etc. Pricing is not where I have a problem with them (after all I do own 300+ DVD’s), but only it’s because I live in the U.S. where everybody has the DVD’s you want and you can take your pick of the price points.

The same DVD in other parts of the world is easily $40 USD - that’s not fair. I’ve been to London, Paris, Frankfurt, Hamburg, Hong Kong, Singapore, and Tokyo so far this year (no SARS yet thank God for that) and the same DVD in those places are often 1.5X to 2.5X what I would have to pay in the U.S… I’d like to get a German language version of Harry Potter for example so I can practice my German, but not at $30… aside from that I need a region free player, which I have that also does automatic PAL -> NTSC and vice versa.

The region code really bugs me, but even that is not why I’m pissed. It’s mainly the industry, and I’m talking about the MPAA here, efforts at taking away my consumer rights and having laws pass that benefits them at my expense. So far the arguments from consumers are falling on deaf ears. Lawmakers could care less about you or me; they only pay us lip service.


#19

Scarpad: It applies equally to both the music and film industry.

As for price… $5 would give them a 400% markup. You work it out.

phuocle: If ever a true word was spoken you have said it all.

I LOVE DVD2ONE, Passionately.


#20

In France, it is legal, and the fact is little known even here, to keep a personal copy of a rented video, for the same reason that it is legal to record TV broadcast. (it’s not legal to give that copy to a friend)

Even the official website of the video record Seller industry state it (lost the link, but I read it)

It should be legal for any media, VHS and DVD-video.

So, it appears that in France it’s the copy prohibition system wich is illegal. We are even paying taxes on tapes, CD-R and DVD-R for that matter.

Currently, consumer leagues are working on stopping anti-copy system on CD-Audio and DVD-video. The fact is, they can’t have the money from blank media and forbid the personal copy.