Again on modem/routers

Hi :slight_smile:

I remember some time ago there were some discussions about the best configuration for ADSL connections.

The best solution at that time was internet --> modem --> Router/Firewall --> Switch --> Computers

I wonder if it is the same also today. I’m asking because in stores I noticed that modems are not more available in shelves. There are only Routers with integrated modem (most of times with also an integrated 4 port switch).

Is it still the best solution to have the modem separated from the router/firewall?

What is a reliable modem and where to get it?

There is a real advantage for an everyday use to have a gigabit switch or a 10/100 is sufficient?

Is it better to get a gigabit switch anyway even if the connection speed is not so high if every computer connected to the switch is provided of a gigabit card?

Because of the Asus Premium is not more available in stores, what is a good alternative?

Thanks :slight_smile:

Hi,[QUOTE=geno888;2309536]
The best solution at that time was internet --> modem --> Router/Firewall --> Switch --> Computers[/quote]The main disadvantage, compared to an all-in-one Modem/Router/Switch device is the higher power consumption.

I wonder if it is the same also today.
I don’t see any disadvantage of an all-in-one device.
I’m asking because in stores I noticed that modems are not more available in shelves. There are only Routers with integrated modem (most of times with also an integrated 4 port switch).
You may have a look in online-shops :wink: Local stores often have limited offers.

Is it still the best solution to have the modem separated from the router/firewall?
It depends on your ISP. With normal ADSL, you should be fine with an all-in-one. It’s different if you plan to switch to Cable Internet. The modem will be useless, and if you can’t disable it, then the whole device can’t be used. In such a scenario, it would be better to have router and modem separately.

What is a reliable modem and where to get it?
I’d guess, the modems from the ISP should be reliable enough - and there won’t be any compatibility issues. :wink:

There is a real advantage for an everyday use to have a gigabit switch or a 10/100 is sufficient?
If you often transfer large amounts of data within your local network, then GBit LAN and GBit switch would be nice. But then I would just get a GBit switch separately, since routers with built-in GBit switches are more expensive.

Michael

Hi, thanks for answers :slight_smile:

Actually I often move tons of data among the two (I hope soon three) machines connected in the network. I didn’t think to this “detail” :o

My ISP didn’t provide a modem, I bought it in a store some years ago. Currently I have a Linksys WAG200G, and it is performing rather well, but this specific model is not more available in stores (both local and online) :frowning:

Cable internet connections here have still too high prices (I really can’t afford such connections :sad:)

Hi,[QUOTE=geno888;2309568]Hi, thanks for answers :)[/quote]You’re Welcome :slight_smile:

My ISP didn’t provide a modem, I bought it in a store some years ago.
That’s different here. For a small amount of money (or even free) if you sign a contract with them :wink: So I have a plain simple DSL modem lying around here.
Currently I have a Linksys WAG200G, and it is performing rather well, but this specific model is not more available in stores (both local and online) :([/quote]Plain ADSL (and Cable) modems aren’t widespread. The few I found after a quick check were rather expensive compared to an all-in-one modem with router.

Cable internet connections here have still too high prices (I really can’t afford such connections :sad:)
My brother pays less for his 10MBit Cable (including Phone flat) than me for a 6 MBit DSL (Phone flat also included).

Michael

It’s still way better to have a separate modem.
Linksys AM200 is a pretty solid modem (so is Zyxel’s models) and for router I’d give Planex MZK-W04NU a go with a third party firmware.
…since I don’t now italian I have to rely on Google :slight_smile:

http://www.ciao.it/Linksys_ADSL_Modem_AM200__673424
Linksys WRT160NL is pretty similar to the Planex although slightly more expensive and it doesn’t have third party support yet but its being worked on…

//Danne

Thanks DiiZzY :slight_smile:

Hi,[QUOTE=DiiZzY;2311214]It’s still way better to have a separate modem.[/quote]Out of curiosity: Why? Consider the scenario, a change of the internet connection (cable vs. DSL) is not planned.

and for router I’d give Planex MZK-W04NU a go with a third party firmware.
So warranty doesn’t matter here :cool:

Michael

Why? Mainly for stability…
Combo units usually share a tiny flash (2-4Mb) and then try to squeeze everything into 16Mb RAM which is way too little usually. The CPU will also have to handle both routing and the DSL-connection since pure hw-solution are too expensive and this is a good way of cutting costs. So in the end you have an underpowered CPU (makes QoS work poorly if it included at all) and way too little ram if you run applications that uses many connections such as eMule/DC/Bittorent/P2P which in the end causes your combo unit/router to reboot, drop connections and hang.

A DSL modem is ~40 EUR and usually ISPs seems to not include modems (for free) or supply crap ones that has NAT enabled by default. At least I plan to use my connection the best way possible.
//Danne

So, for the same reason, is it better also to not use the switch embedded in most routers and prefer instead a separate switch?

Never had a problem with my all-in-one.
But if you are a heavy user with enterprise-class traffic, then you may add enterprise-class routers and switches to your DSL modem :bigsmile:

Michael

The switch hardware works fine by its own, although it might be worth investing in one if you want gbit at home. I can highly recommend Allied Telesyn’s entry gbit switches.
//Danne

I just checked their homepage… :eek:

It seems professional hardware, and I’m rather scared to find prices :bigsmile:

http://www.ciao.it/Allied_Telesyn_AT_GS900_8_8__599063
http://www.alliedtelesis.com/products/detail.aspx?pid=57&lid=58

http://www.ciao.it/Allied_Telesis_AT_GS950_8_WebSmart_Switch__1106951
http://www.alliedtelesis.com/products/detail.aspx?pid=220&lid=68

The GS950 is a “smart” switch and has a webui which allows you to control your network much better than with a SOHO switch such as a GS900 but it’s still a good choice irregardless of which one you pick.

I should perhaps mention that I run a similar configuration at home :slight_smile:
I have a Scientific Atlanta Cable Modem connect to my router which is also my fileserver running FreeBSD 8.0 among with other network/internet services. It’s hooked up to an Allied Telesis GS900/8 switch which has a Planex MZK-W04NU running in Access Point-mode connected to it among with a Xerox (rebadged Samsung) network printer among with some other clients etc. =)

//Danne

Thanks a lot DiiZzY :bow::bow:

np, time for some shopping? :slight_smile:
//Danne

I only need to have a talk with the wallet :doh:, but I think that in september I’ll start to buy the new components :iagree:

The wallet says “I feel fat and need to go on a diet!”
//Danne

LOL

the wallet is already screaming :bigsmile:

Browsing a webstore, I found this switch. Is it good or is better the Allied Telesis one? :eek:

I’m asking because there is a rather big price difference :doh:

The difference is that it lacks gigabit… :slight_smile:
http://www.chl.it/w3obj/h/default/$productdetails?a_codart=5839700&session=0&i_cdsroot=18318229 probably works just as good as the Planex one if you only need 100mbit.
//Danne