Adding fan on top of existing CPU fan is ok? Or no?

vbimport

#1

I hear a computer that has an AMD chip and AMD heatsync and the fan speeds to over 6000 rpm and is loud.

I would ask if it is recommended or deemed ok to stack another fan on top of existing CPU fan facing in the same direction of original?

Thank you


#2

I would say that is way to loud and stacking I thinks would defeat the purpose of cooling unless it was designed from beginning to be that way. Also why not just use liquid cooling setup that they now have out to void all that loud noise. That loud of a fan sounds like it will break or isn’t working properly anymore.


#3

True, but not everyone has the budget or knowledge of using liquid cooling. And if the pump emits a noise too, then it may not be as quiet as expected. Since OP is using original HSF w/the CPU, then it’s not likely he may want to spend that much on cooling.

@SubZero,
You would likely have a counter-productive effect when piggy-backing fans. You would need to invest in some quiet HSF combo or you can look into just replacing the stock fan with something more quiet.


#4

Also, try cleaning out the HSF, sometimes they are just completely clogged with dust and hair.


#5

Thank you for replies

My system is new and came with stock AMD HSF with the fan producing much noise at RPM speed over 5000. My temperature on the core is not to exceed 62C and under normal use it stays 41C to 44C and in very hard gaming use it has not passed 53C.

I had thought to reduce the noise of HSF by trying to stack fan to cool down the area of the chip thinking it would then not go as high. I have assumed speed increase as heat increase inside of area near the CPU chip.

The chip system is under warranty with the rest of the computer and changing HSF to another would void the terms so I thought leaving fan in place only adding to the cooling.

Thank you for helping


#6

Your CPU temps are fine.

If you enter the BIOS of the computer while it is first starting up. There should be an option to allow the fan to adjust it’s speed relative to the CPU temps instead of being on full blast all the time. On Asus motherboards this option is called QFan. Look around in there, it should be fairly obvious.


#7

Thank you for reply

I have set it to relative temperature and it is while gaming or converting audio or video that the chip fan spins up to 6000+


#8

You can also try controlling the the fan with speedfan:
http://www.almico.com/speedfan440.exe
Great monitoring program. Just keep an eye on your CPU temps if you are converting audio or video.


#9

[QUOTE=adict2jane;2502625]You can also try controlling the the fan with speedfan:
http://www.almico.com/speedfan440.exe
Great monitoring program. Just keep an eye on your CPU temps if you are converting audio or video.[/QUOTE]

Thank you for reply

I have found the Speed Fan for looking on speed and temps but my MB is not on the list of those it can adjust.

I would ask are there others that could do that? It is only the CPU fan that I wish to slow if it will not break the chip.


#10

hmm, well, the only other thing I can think of is to get a fan controller. But if you did that, you might as well spend the money on a new HSF. Did your motherboard come with any utilities that you can set the fan speed with?


#11

Thank you for reply

I had not considered your suggestion on MB utility. I have Gigabyte MA770T-UD3P. I will seek to find the program if it is on their site.

Thank you for helping


#12

I think for Gigabyte boards the utility with fan control is EasyTune. Hope it works! :slight_smile:


#13

[QUOTE=adict2jane;2502785]I think for Gigabyte boards the utility with fan control is EasyTune. Hope it works! :)[/QUOTE]

Thank you for reply

I have found and used the EasyTune 6 utility and find if I do adjust it down even from 6xxx to 5xxx max the temperature of the core rises up to 58c which is only 4c away from the 62c maximum I have read of so I will not be using the program but will now consider new HSF combination. That will void warranty though so I must need to think hard if it will be worth doing afterall.

Thank you for helping


#15

I don’t have too much experience with AMD CPUs but I would not worry too much about your temps. Voltage is much more of a killer than temps and even running at 62c 24/7, your CPU will probably last a long time, like years and years. I have not heard of any CPU dying solely due to heat (besides completely removing the HSF or other stupid experiments). Chances are you PSU/motherboard/GPU will die long before.

Maybe someone else with more AMD CPU experience can chime in.