Adding a second monitor (ports?)

vbimport

#1

I want to add a second monitor to my PC…mainly for use with Photoshop.

What ports can I use?

The PC has a good graphics card Nvidia GeForce GT450 with the following ports

[ul]
[li]1x VGA
[/li][li]1x DVI-I
[/li][li]1x DVI-D
[/li][li]HDMI
[/li][/ul]

The two monitors are both Dell H 2410 with the following ports each

[ul]
[li]1x VGA
[/li][li]2x DVI
[/li][li]1x HDMI
[/li][/ul]

The current monitor is connected via VGA - VGA

What´s the best way to connect the second monitor?

[ul]
[li]PC DVI to Monitor VGA ?
[/li][li]PC DVI to Monitor DVI ?
[/li][li]HDMI to HDMI ?
[/li][/ul]

…or something else?
…or does it matter?

Cheers
Dean


#2

Some cards don’t allow DVI and HDMI at the same time, but since you have one connected by VGA now, I would think you could use either the DVI or HDMI connectors without issues.

On a computer, I’ve always used DVI–>DVI when available.


#3

HDMI and DVI…it will give you the easiest way the same refresh rate and the same screen resolution for both monitors,and most important,the best quality signal…


#4

Go DVI or HDMI. Either DVI port should be fine, since I’m assuming the monitor will request DVI-D when connected to the DVI-I port on the graphics card.

VGA is said to be not so good at higher resolutions, and I found that VGA at 1080p resulted in muddled color reproduction and a loss of sharpness in addition to the screen not refreshing as smoothly. Going back to DVI-D/HDMI fixed my problems. Less important is that I found HDMI to result in the screen going to sleep and waking more instantaneously & required no auto-adjust of any sort.


#5

I would guess the two DVIs work together - the DVI-I is Integrated, also supports analog (DVI to VGA)
The DVI-D is digital only, the analog side for that probably goes to the single VGA.

So you can use 2x DVI (best), or 2x VGA using the VGA and an adapter on the DVI-I.

The analog part of the DVI-I is the 4 pins around the slot end.


#6

Good grief…you guys rock.

I´m gonna try to pick up a DVI-I to VGA for the second monitor and see what happens.

:flower:


#7

As far as the image goes it shouldn’t matter if you use DVI or HDMI.

But for your work uniformity & consistency is very important, so I would try to avoid using VGA.

Even the best monitors look less sharp with an analogue input as you are relying on the monitor to digitise the analogue signal, and colour accuracy could suffer as well.

DVI uses separate pins for analogue & digital, so there shouldn’t be any settings to change. A standard DVI-DVI cable is all you need for you DVI-I port.

You shouldn’t need a dual-link cable for 1920x1200 resolution. Some old graphics cards (~10 years) limited the DVI frequency by default, which needed to be disabled to achieve higher resolutions. But I would be surprised if a modern one like yours did this.


#8

Back…got the DVI-I - VGA convertor, and things look fine.

except the colors are slightly different :rolleyes:

So…I should go for DVI - DVI for both monitors…for better image quality?


#9

Yeah, you’ll probably have better luck if both are DVI. All digital signal means you should be able to set up each display with relatively similar settings and get similar color reproduction from both.

I’m guessing no amount of tweaking to the newly connected display even gets close the original display connected via VGA? Color profiles and all that?


#10

Using an analogue VGA connection is like copying an audio CD using your sound card (digital to analogue to digital again). Except that your vision is probably more sensitive to differences as it can compare two images side by side. Switching to DVI/HDMI should help, but it probably won’t solve the problem.

Getting multiple displays calibrated is tricky anyway. Do you have a device for calibrating monitors?

There used to be issues with Windows only loading the colour profile for the first monitor, and the calibration software may only supports multiple monitors if you buy a more expensive version.


#11

EIther use both DVI links or DVI and HDMI.

Frankly, I would suggest upgrading to a less power hungry graphics card. You’ll save money in the long run. The NVIDIA 750 Ti has Maxwell architecture and uses less power:


#12

[QUOTE=Ibex;2743407]There used to be issues with Windows only loading the colour profile for the first monitor[/QUOTE]

Does that happen too when having identical monitors?
I have 3 LG monitors for my eyefinity setup,and the colors seem fine to me…
Although I run eyefinity for gaming,I have also a license for DisplayFusion which makes handling multi monitor setups much more powerful.


#13

[QUOTE=roadworker;2743420]Does that happen too when having identical monitors?
I have 3 LG monitors for my eyefinity setup,and the colors seem fine to me…
Although I run eyefinity for gaming,I have also a license for DisplayFusion which makes handling multi monitor setups much more powerful.[/QUOTE]
If you have calibrated your displays, then using same model of monitor wouldn’t solve the problem. Each monitor would need its own corrected colour profile loaded.

The problem exists in Windows XP. It appears to also affect Vista & 7 (although some sources imply it doesn’t). I’m not sure about 8. The solution is to use 3rd party software to automatically load the colour profiles.

The calibration software for your colourimeter (or photospectrometer) will probably take care of loading the correct profile to each monitor. If it won’t let you calibrate multiple monitors (without paying for an upgrade), you may be able to overcome this limitation be calibrating the monitors one at a time (disconnecting the others if necessary), then using a 3rd party utility to load the profiles, taking care to match profiles to monitors.

If you have not calibrated your displays and are just using the manufacturer’s default profile, then having the same model avoid the problem. But it is well worth calibrating your displays.

If you don’t have a hardware calibration device, go to Control Panel -> Colour Management -> Advanced -> Calibrate Display. This will take you through some tests to try and set the correct gamma (like the old Adobe Gamma utility). It is no substitute for proper calibration using a colourimeter or photospectrometer, but it better than nothing.

[I]Apologies to Dean if I have gone a bit off topic.[/I] :flower:


#14

If you have not calibrated your displays and are just using the manufacturer’s default profile, then having the same model avoid the problem.

Ah,I see…that’s my case…:iagree:

But it is well worth calibrating your displays

Never had the urge to do so,but now I’m curious about it…:bigsmile:

Many THX for your detailed explanation!:clap: