AC3 5.1 => Generic mp4(h.264, aac) not what I thought

I did the research, moved my whole DVD (movie/music video/tv) collection over to the digital world, and I guess I made a poor ASSumption or just didn’t understand what I was doing. The audio isn’t what I expected.

I choose the mp4 container. Seemed widely accepted and it worked with a couple of really nice compression algorithms…h.264 and AAC.

I choose DVDFAb as the tool to do all the work.

Used the Generic option under the DVD to Mobile group. Always choose the AC3 5.1 as the audio source.

It wasn’t until I finished my whole collection that I realized the AAC was only 2 channel (I don’t have a 5.1 setup/receiver yet, but I’m trying to have things ready for the future). I know the AAC spec. said that it could handle something like 40-some-odd channels, so I just figured I would get 6 channel AAC encoded if I choose to use the AC3-5.1 audio track…I guess I was wrong.

So, now I’m sitting with all of my stuff with 2-channel audio. I’ve begun to look into ripping the AC3 5.1 audio tracks, transcoding them to AAC 5.1 and then muxing them with the h.264 video stream I already have. In order to prevent myself from making another big oversight/mistake, I would like to get the opinions of the people “who’ve been there, done that”… so fellas, what do you think?

Thanks for your input,
Eric

i think it’s far wiser to convert your DVDs to digital DVDs i.e. via the DVD to DVD options, & buy more hard drive storage space if you need to. Then use a good dvd software player - I also have the cyberlink remote which is very good.

sooner or later you’ll have a really BIG screen , as they keep getting cheaper, & you will then wish you had not compressed the video !
I do that & only use generic compression options for instances where I only want a small extract.

there is a generic + audio copy option whihc leaves the audio unchanged but I’ve had grief with that option in Vista MEdia centre

compression only makes sense if you want truly mobile solutions

I thought about that too. Thing is though, I did 4 compressions, at 4 different levels, and found 1 that I was satisfied with. BTW, I did this testing on a 57"er.

I’m not a huge audio/video-phile. Fact is, my eyes and ears just aren’t that good, and neither is my pallete for that matter.

Also, compression makes sense to each person individually. If comression didn’t make sense, then why did mp3’s take off like they did?

[QUOTE=ejmccalla;2039920]I thought about that too. Thing is though, I did 4 compressions, at 4 different levels, and found 1 that I was satisfied with. BTW, I did this testing on a 57"er.

I’m not a huge audio/video-phile. Fact is, my eyes and ears just aren’t that good, and neither is my pallete for that matter.

Also, compression makes sense to each person individually. If comression didn’t make sense, then why did mp3’s take off like they did?[/QUOTE]

OK - well try the generic xvid + audiocopy option to preserve multi channel sound & use high quality video settings - others here have suggested video bit rates of 1500.

mp3 took off back in the daya when disc space was expensive and a collection of 5000 music files came close to filling your hard drive!

I’ve re-ripped all the stuff I did at 128k mp3, to use 192k variable instead - I abandoned a plan to move to mp4a instead as mp3 has wonderful compatibility with all other software.

but it seems to me that if you use surround sound you could spend 100 hours compressing 100 movies, compared with just buyng a 500gb external drive & putting 100 main movies onto that in DVD format. in about 1/4 of the time.

with the latter solution you don’t have to worry about whether you ripped the audio correctly or whether you optimised the audio volume ( which seems to need setting differently for some movies)

It’s not just about audio & video quality - it’s about retaining all of the DVD playback controls - freeze, zoom, slow, fast, angle, subttitle etc and being able to use a remote with your PC to control all of that.

I use DVD43 and handbrake for both my Mac and Vista machines.