About ISP and bandwidth

vbimport

#1

Ive noticed my max upload speeds in utorrent top off at about 270kB/s

Is that about rite for 2 mbps?

Shouldn’t I be able to seed at 2048kB/s?

or is it mega bits per second?

I have the basic

NOT BOOST

o and also I am connected to router (if that matters)

Thanks guys, mike…


#2

Your getting your big and little B’s mixed up

usually b= bits and B = bytes, there are 8b’s in a B

For most maths to work stuff out I find its easier to just do a b/10 = B type thing as its close enough and allows some margin of error for things like error correction etc.

270KB/s is good for a 2Mb/s transfer


#3

Bandwidth Calculator:wink:


#4

thanks guys! : )


#5

typically speaking when you see kbps you devide by 8 to get KB/s (which is more common and familiar… i personally DONT see WHY people use kbps/mbps instead of KB/s or MB/s which makes more sense since you see KB/s and MB/s alot more often when say downloading your typical file on the internet)

so say you got a 768k internet connection… that would mean about 96KB/s (actually a little lower cause of overhead… probably around 85KB/s ish… cause on my 384kbps DSL connection i should get 48KB/s when in reality i max out @ 40KB/s cause of the overhead)

also say you see a connection that says 15mbps … that’s 15000kbps devided by 8 = 1875KB/s (or 1.8-1.9MB/s)

so as to the OP’s question of … how fast 2mbps (2000kbps) is… it’s roughly 250KB/s


#6

Moved to the [I]Music Download, P2P, and Legal issue[/I]s forum.


#7

[QUOTE=NBR;2153603]… i personally DONT see WHY people use kbps/mbps instead of KB/s or MB/s which makes more sense since you see KB/s and MB/s alot more often when say downloading your typical file on the internet)[/QUOTE]
Because serial transmission mediums transmit bits per second.

Parallel technologies transmit Bytes per second.

Aka … Parallel ATA transmits (upto) @ 133 Mega-Bytes / second because it can transfer 32b (aka 4Bytes) at a single instant, whereas serial ata transmits at (upto) 3 giga-[B]bits[/B] per second because only a single bit can be transmitted on the medium at any particular instant.

And if you really want to get funky …
A mega is 1 million, not 2^20 as measured in computer terms, similarly Giga is 1 Billion, not 2^30 as measured in computer terms :slight_smile:


#8

If you really want to get to the nuts and bolts of it 1 KB (KiloByte) is really 1024 bits. Some HD manufacturers have gone way over board to tell ppl the size of the drive as compared to the actual amount of data that can be stored on that drive. Dell has done this on their site as well.

Just my 2 cents.
WKT


#9

[QUOTE=wkt37211;2154772]If you really want to get to the nuts and bolts of it 1 KB (KiloByte) is really 1024 bits. Some HD manufacturers have gone way over board to tell ppl the size of the drive as compared to the actual amount of data that can be stored on that drive. Dell has done this on their site as well.

Just my 2 cents.
WKT[/QUOTE]
Unfortunately your 2c is incorrect - and has been for 8 years :slight_smile:

Kilo = 1000
Mega = 1000,000
Giga = 1000,000,000

Kibi = 1024
Mebi = 1024 x 1024 = 1048576
Gibi = 1024 x 1024 x 1024 = 1073,741,824

You must remember that any classical (mechanical) recording medium is serial technology.
RAM based devices are different - they are parallel based technologies.

Bluray/DVD/CD/HDD/Floppy Discs are all serial technologies. Write one bit, then another - therefore they are serial, and specified as such.
Flash Ram / RAM write multiple bytes simultaneously - therefore technically should be specified in MebiBytes/Gibibytes/TebiBytes.

The advent of HDD & Optical Drive Caches & the parallel based interfaces has confused the situation somewhat.