A look back at VHS picture quality

vbimport

#1

The following is an interesting video I came across about the VHS tapes showing what the quality was like on various movie titles. As the video mentions, VHS is a format that doesn’t seem to be doing as well as other retro formats:

//youtu.be/uzlcoWWdHoA

Sure the picture quality was not that great, but VHS did have a few advantages over DVD and Blu-ray, not mentioned in that video:

[ul]
[li]You could easily fast-forward straight to the movie, very useful when watching older titles for which the ads/trailers are obsolete.
[/li][li]They were robust, especially with kids handling them. Sure they may scratch or crack the outer case on a VHS tape, but that didn’t affect its playback. Try that with a disc.
[/li][li]They were easy to record on and most people knew how to record on VHS. While many people have DVD recorders, most haven’t a clue how to record to DVD, let how to about buying blank discs.
[/li][li]No artificial region code restriction. Most VHS players could play both NTSC and PAL tapes.
[/li][/ul]

Then again, I can’t imagine most going back to that format. It was the one format where pretty much everyone could clearly see the superior image quality of moving to DVD. At this stage, DVD has done so well that many don’t even see Blu-ray as a worthwhile upgrade despite another significant leap in picture quality. As for 4K, I think that’s going to see a very slow adoption, if it doesn’t fail by then.


#2

To me, the big addition regarding VHS was the hi-fi sound some players had incorporated. This was the genesis of hi-fi audio in regard to video for home use and I really liked having it.


#3

[QUOTE=Seán;2773131]Sure the picture quality was not that great, but VHS did have a few advantages over DVD and Blu-ray, not mentioned in that video:
[ul]
[li]You could easily fast-forward straight to the movie, very useful when watching older titles for which the ads/trailers are obsolete.[/li][/ul]
[/QUOTE] Not necessary with DVD copies containing only the main movie; which is why copies are sometimes better than the original.

[ul]
[li]They were robust, especially with kids handling them. Sure they may scratch or crack the outer case on a VHS tape, but that didn’t affect its playback. Try that with a disc.[/li]> [/ul]

…or when tape salad happens, your VHS tape and your VHS player could both be ruined at the same time!


#4

I’d regard VHS footage as almost unwatchable these days.

When got my first DVD the difference was so pronounced that I got rid of all my tapes and bought anything I really wanted again on DVD.

HD has been slightly different though as I don’t have many physical discs and I watch most of the HD content I want to view via Sky Digital.

It’s indicative of how things have moved on I suppose.

[B]Wombler[/B]


#5

I bought hi fi decks, SVHS decks, laser disk players, and finally a dvd player when Pioneer made a basic one that could also play audio CDs as many early players could not as they had a DVD only pickup.
It turned out that pioneer also didn’t have any of the digital artifacts most other cheap players had that I bought later.
If you find one of the few svhs players with a time base correction circuit low speed tapes have much better color and are slightly sharper.
I have a JVC 9600 and a Mitsubishi 795? And they both have dtbc circuits and my old tapes look much better played through them and they have the maximum resolution SD TV allows in the fastest speed.
Look up the Sony SLVR5 deck as it was one of the most advanced svhs decks ever made and some folks still collect and rebuild them.


#6

Yeah worse than I remember is more like it. I only grew up with the format and it was a Godsend when DVD’s came out.

Blu-ray beats them all.


#7

What I remember most of all about VHS, was going to the video rental shop with my sister to rent a video on a cold winters day.

We got home and couldn’t wait to watch the video. I put on the TV, and put the tape in the VHS recorder, and was met with a terrible noise from inside the machine. The tape had wrapped itself around the rotating head, and wrote off both the tape and the machine. Needless to say, my dad wasn’t pleased. :slight_smile:

He had to buy a new machine, and had to pay for a new rental tape at the video rental shop.

Me and my sister were told our pocket money would be stopped for six months, although that never actually happened.

The sad thing is. I can’t recall for the life of me what the film was.


#8

I did learn how to take apart the cases and put the tape back on the reel and if the tape wasn’t as bad as Dee is talking about I could re roll it and get it working again most of the time. Sure spent a lot of money on retail tapes as well as rentals.


#9

Worked in the AV dept in school so I learned how to splice them back together, still do some now and then with my collection of vhs.


#10

[QUOTE=Dee;2773671]What I remember most of all about VHS, was going to the video rental shop with my sister to rent a video on a cold winters day.

We got home and couldn’t wait to watch the video. I put on the TV, and put the tape in the VHS recorder, and was met with a terrible noise from inside the machine. The tape had wrapped itself around the rotating head, and wrote off both the tape and the machine. Needless to say, my dad wasn’t pleased. :slight_smile:

He had to buy a new machine, and had to pay for a new rental tape at the video rental shop.

Me and my sister were told our pocket money would be stopped for six months, although that never actually happened.

The sad thing is. I can’t recall for the life of me what the film was.[/QUOTE]

LOL, that was another benefit of DVDs, no unravelling inside the player. :bigsmile:

Your Dad might remember what film it was though if he was the one that had to pay for it. ;):slight_smile:

[B]Wombler[/B]


#11

[QUOTE=bean55;2773715]Worked in the AV dept in school so I learned how to splice them back together, still do some now and then with my collection of vhs.[/QUOTE]

Yeah, I used to do that with cassette tapes as well. :iagree:

[B]Wombler[/B]