A bit of fun from my hometown...:)

vbimport

#1

I’ve never known whether I was proud or not of my accent…in stories and on TV, whenever there’s a (British) country character, or a farmer, they always have a West Country accent, same as mine.

I have a pretty broad accent too, which makes it worse. Only in recent years have I become quite proud of the accent and its quirks, and even more so after reading this page from the BBC News site: http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-bristol-17523102 :bigsmile:

You guys ever feel the same about your own accents?


#2

Only from another person from another country,of course we in the states also have different dialects . The different between the east coast to the west coast can really change.And a person from the south here is sure easy to pick out from someone in the north.But you should be proud of your native language it’s part of you.


#3

Be proud of your accent, no matter where you come from.

I hadn’t actually noticed about the rural farmer accent you mentioned until you mentioned it, and you’re right. :slight_smile:

I guess it’s the same all over. Everyone think that a Scottish accent is the same as a Glaswegian accent, or everyone in Scotland has the same accent, and speaks like Taggart. :slight_smile:

The east coast is very very different, and by all accounts very posh. :slight_smile:

Be proud of where you’re from and how you speak.


#4

Yo-

What accent?


#5

LOL @ Mike :bigsmile:

@Dee and Dougie - yep, you’re right about being proud of where you come from and the accent that goes with it. :slight_smile:

Along the lines of what Dee mentions about the East coast of Scotland, we have an area here in Bristol (Clifton) that’s dead posh - only a very, very slight hint of Bristolian that you’d only catch if you were looking for it. I;ve never lived there, haha :slight_smile:



#6

[QUOTE=Arachne;2628170]
Along the lines of what Dee mentions about the East coast of Scotland, we have an area here in Bristol (Clifton) that’s dead posh - only a very, very slight hint of Bristolian that you’d only catch if you were looking for it. I’ve never lived there, haha :)[/QUOTE]
Along still similar lines… I know I have an accent that sounds not like the stereotypical southern U.S. accent, and a few folks from my same hometown have the same thing. But the rest of the folks have more traditional accents. Of course, we posh folks (as you might be wont to call us) do slip into accents on certain words, which is always an opportunity for a jab & a joke. :slight_smile:

'Course, when folks used to the deep south accent hear me, they ask from where I originate. “Here…?” is my typical response to their question. They then either fail to believe me, or ask to what school(s) I went/go. As such, I don’t really get a chance to feel embarrassed or anything, because more likely than not, people marvel at my speech patterns the second I say a sentence with some substance.

Elocution: It’s what’s for dinner.® :bigsmile:


#7

Rats, Albert - you just shattered my image of you speaking with a lovely broad Southern accent :stuck_out_tongue: :doh:

EDIT: Well, not image…you know what I means :stuck_out_tongue:


#8

[QUOTE=Arachne;2628174]Rats, Albert - you just shattered my image of you speaking with a lovely broad Southern accent :stuck_out_tongue: :doh:

EDIT: Well, not image…you know what I means :p[/QUOTE]

I’m sure you would pick up on something in my voice. It may not be 100% of the swanky twang you have in mind, but there’s a certain…something to it. :iagree:


#9

[QUOTE=Albert;2628177]I’m sure you would pick up on something in my voice. It may not be the drawl you have in mind, but there’s a certain…something to it. :iagree:[/QUOTE]

Sounds like our “Posh Bristolians”, hehe :smiley:


#10

All this talk of accents made this come to mind. :bigsmile:

Rambling Syd Rumpo (aka Kenneth Williams)

Dear only knows what the non-UK folks will make of this! :bigsmile::bigsmile::bigsmile:

[B]Wombler[/B]


#11

I have a Texas accent but there are many accents just in Texas.
A US Northerner might label them all the same & even call them a Southern accent like
Albert says he has. I bet he can tell a Texan from people in his area.
Here’s a geography lesson to put this in perspective for Arachne & others in the UK.
Texas is 268,581 sq mi (696,241 km2).
England is 130,373 square kilometers (50,337 square miles).
The UK is 244,820 square kilometers (94,525 square miles) .
So Texas is some larger than the UK. About 2 1/2 times larger.
My accent is NW Texan . I have some relatives just 90 miles North & they speak slower .
If you go to Dallas the accent is faster & more Southern US but still the more Western Texas . The farther South & East you go the more US Southern & eventually Louisiana Cajun influenced .
West Texas like Kerry56 is from is a lot like ours in the Panhandle .
To add to that across the state some people are of Mexican descent . Even those born here can have a very heavy “Mexican” accent . Funny thing is some sound just like I do & no “Mexican” accent at all. That is hard for me to figure out. Since I’ve known both sides to speak Mexican . Before someone corrects me with Spanish it is similar but not the same as Mexican. Mexican has many American Indian words or words derived from,
Also English & French derived words.

@ Wombler , I got the " This video is not available in your country " message . From the link .
I think this one is the same maybe;


#12

#13

Interesting, we still use the expression ‘to red up’ here in Northern Ireland but it’s spelt differently.

[B]Wombler[/B]


#14

I don’t know what ‘to red up’ means but I can guess .
My great grandfather was a red haired light complected Irishman.
I don’t know if he was born in Ireland or here in the US .
My mother was about the same .I took more to the German/Dutch side myself.
To get back to the ‘to red up’ applying it to my mother. Does it mean to get mad ?

I should have listened to the Pittsburghese video first . ‘to red up’ means to clean the house .

I still go with my guess being pretty good . If you had seen my mom about to loose her temper
you would have thought the same . As she turned from pale to bright red.


#15

[QUOTE=cholla;2628193]I don’t know what ‘to red up’ means but I can guess .
My great grandfather was a red haired light complected Irishman.
I don’t know if he was born in Ireland or here in the US .
My mother was about the same .I took more to the German/Dutch side myself.
To get back to the ‘to red up’ applying it to my mother. Does it mean to get mad ?[/QUOTE]
Red up just means clean up, yinz=ya’ll. I know what you are saying about Texas, I lived in Houston for 2 years. When we moved to Michigan a lot of my friends thought I was British :confused:.


#16

[QUOTE=cholla;2628193]I don’t know what ‘to red up’ means but I can guess .
My great grandfather was a red haired light complected Irishman.
I don’t know if he was born in Ireland or here in the US .
My mother was about the same .I took more to the German/Dutch side myself.
To get back to the ‘to red up’ applying it to my mother. Does it mean to get mad ?

I should have listened to the Pittsburghese video first . ‘to red up’ means to clean the house .

I still go with my guess being pretty good . If you had seen my mom about to loose her temper
you would have thought the same . As she turned from pale to bright red.[/QUOTE]

It’s to clean up or clear up any sort of mess.

You’d talk about getting the house red up when tidying or cleaning etc. of course it could also mean giving it a coat of paint or generally making it look better. :slight_smile:

[B]Wombler[/B]


#17

yinz=ya’ll another form of youins.

Once I watched the Pittsburghese YouTube I got red up.
I was still listening to the Rambling Syd Rumpo Kenneth Williams
when I posted.


#18

[B]@Arachne[/B]

[B]Darth Vader[/B] had a west country accent (before he was dubbed).

If anyone wants to hear what Darth really sounded like, look for the old ‘Green Cross Code’ adverts (IIRC the earlier ones were dubbed, but the later ones weren’t).


#19

[QUOTE=Ibex;2628362][B]@Arachne[/B]

[B]Darth Vader[/B] had a west country accent (before he was dubbed).

If anyone wants to hear what Darth really sounded like, look for the old ‘Green Cross Code’ adverts (IIRC the earlier ones were dubbed, but the later ones weren’t).[/QUOTE]

Yep good old Dave Prowse!

[B]Wombler[/B]


#20