2ch ac3 to 5.1

vbimport

#1

how can i put a file in 2ch ac3 to 5.1. tou see my dvd filme in my home cinema in my 6 channels??? what program?


#2

if i understand the question correctly, you want to convert from 2ch to 6ch? there’s no advantage to doing this since you don’t have the additional channels necessary for real surround sound, and the resulting audio stream would end up taking more of the space on the dvd. a better idea would be to change the output mode on your receiver to have the sound come from all speakers even when playing only stereo sound.


#3

Real commercial surround sound is extrapolated from an original stereo source …

Voices->Front Centre
Original Signal - partial voice ->Front L/R
Ultra Low Frequency -> Subwoofer.
!Voice -> Rear L/R

I asked the same question a long time ago. I doubt the answer has changed.

I’d like a 1 button program to convert 2 channel stereo 44.1KHz -> 5.1 / 6.1 AC3, just so I could hear my CD’s in 5.1, like audio DVD’s :slight_smile:

Try here Here though, if you feel dedicated enough :wink:


#4

this is the method I use:
http://forum.doom9.org/showthread.php?threadid=59949
very time consuming, but does work well. I skip the BeSweet encoding part and use a different encoder. You’ll still need a encoder that supports 5.1 encoding like AC3Enc or Softencode. Besweet’s AC3 encoder has known incompatibilities with certain players (although I think the issue has been sorted out)


#5

interesting, i had no idea there were guides for creating your own surround channels. i wouldn’t agree that commercial surround is extrapolated from stereo sources though. for instance, following the above guidelines:

Voices->Front Centre
Original Signal - partial voice ->Front L/R
Ultra Low Frequency -> Subwoofer.
!Voice -> Rear L/R

everything happening “in front” of the viewer would also be heard “behind” the viewer, meaning that any directional sound (aside from left/right) would be ignored, including explosions that are meant to be heard only from “behind”, etc. real commercial surround tracks are artificially created to take this into consideration and also involve directional mics.


#6

I’m pretty sure they still use only a stereo recording initially.

However, you are entirely correct about the processing.They do ALOT of pre-processing, changing each channels phases & delays, amplitudes, voice removal algorithms, etc, performed on processing arrays on the scale that would make most computer fanatics cream themselves in glee and is unavailable to the general consumer, or at least in a decent timeframe.

It’s like A3D and dolby surround. Lots of cool effects to make everything sound right.