16:9 Widescreen?

vbimport

#1

I’ve just got a new bluray player with USB port and now I’m ripping all my DVDs to put my entire collection on a 2TB USB HD attached to the player.

I have a 1920px800p movie on my external USB HD and the movie is without black bars and letterboxing.

If I just play the movie as it is with Bluray settings of “16:9 widescreen” for my FULL HD TV I see a vertically stretched image (horizontally shrinked) which occupies all the size of the monitor, which is really awful.

After changing the video settings on my Bluray Player from “16:9 widescreeen” to simply “16:9” for my TV, the player (or the TV??) adds the bars itself and I can watch the movie correctly (with correct 1:78 ratio).

So it was just a matter of changing “16:9 widescreen” to “16:9”.

As I’m a complete newbie, can you explain what is the difference between the two settings as my TV is a full HD 1920px1080p (which I think it IS a “widescreen”!) ??

Thanks in advance for your kindness.


#2

It’s most likely that the player & TV don’t use exactly the same terminology.
It seems to me the “full screen” (16:9 wide screen) is coming on with the resolution either “zoomed” or “stretched” . If your TV has this kind of settings you might verify this.
I haven’t looked it up but my guess is the 16:9 setting would be for an older CRT TV to play letterbox video better.


#3

[QUOTE=cholla;2745579]It’s most likely that the player & TV don’t use exactly the same terminology.
It seems to me the “full screen” (16:9 wide screen) is coming on with the resolution either “zoomed” or “stretched” . If your TV has this kind of settings you might verify this.
I haven’t looked it up but my guess is the 16:9 setting would be for an older CRT TV to play letterbox video better.[/QUOTE]

Thanks!! but what is the resolution of a “16:9 widescreen” then to properly add letterboxing to a 1920x800 image?? mine is 1920x1080, shouldn’t it be widescreen and render the image properly??


#4

There is no such thing as 1920x800 on a DVD, or Blu-ray for that matter. Your movie has been ripped incorrectly. If the source is a DVD, its probably something like 720x480 with the black bars being part of the image. That’s the way it should be ripped. Anything else will result in a loss of quality and aspect ratio issues such as you have seen. Players like a BD player are often not capable of correctly dealing with non-standard aspect ratios like 1920x800.

But again, if its a DVD, it should be ripped in DVD resolution (720x480 or 705x480) with no cropping. An MKV file must also have the correct 16:9 aspect flag for correct display.


#5

You need to look up information on resolution.
You will find a lot.
The problem lies in that the standard isn’t always followed.
It can even make a difference if you are connecting HDMI instead of USB .
On the same equipment.
Here is a comparison to something different:
If a restaurant has fried potatoes on their menu & you order them.
Then what you get is mashed potatoes .
You complain & they tell you that is what they call fried potatoes.

Your player isn’t supplying what your TV expects as 16:9 widescreen.

I also agree with CDan’s post.


#6

Thanks to you all… you are probably right, I simply ripped in thw wrong manner cropping the black bars from the original movie (I thought the final result would have been smaller in size)

But if I rip a DVD to 720x480 I get an aspect ratio of 1.5 which is not the 1.78 of a 16:9 TV so CDan are you sure about the sizes??

Thanks again :slight_smile:


#7

[QUOTE=boito50;2745587]
But if I rip a DVD to 720x480 I get an aspect ratio of 1.5 which is not the 1.78 of a 16:9 TV so CDan are you sure about the sizes??

Thanks again :)[/QUOTE]

Not easy to wrap your head around, but yes. 720x480 is the max resolution for DVD-V format. How it gets displayed, (4:3 vs 16:9), is simply a matter of the AR flag which is applied. This happened because DVD-V was invented in a 4:3 world, the 16:9 flag was added to allow compatibility with 16:9 displays. The player sends it out as 4:3 or 16:9 based on that flag, but the number of pixels is the same either way. Your TV also has settings to let you stretch a 4:3 out to 16:9, again displaying the same pixels. Your TV should also have a setting to let it display something like 1920x800 with bars at top and bottom, in case your player doesn’t.

Talking about DVDs, lets just mention that there are some older DVDs that claim to be “Widescreen Version” which are in fact a letterboxed 4:3 image. MGM was actually sued and lost over this little trick. But those type discs are still out there.

Blu-ray eliminated all this foolishness, all BD is 16:9.