150 tdk +r $21.99/free ship

vbimport

#1

TDK DVD+R 16X 4.7GB 150 Discs (3 - 50pk Spindles)

http://www.buy.com/prod/tdk-dvd-r-16x-4-7gb-150-discs-3-50pk-spindles/213348832.html

Have never used these myself so no idea about the quality or MID.


#2

[QUOTE=felch;2612993]TDK DVD+R 16X 4.7GB 150 Discs (3 - 50pk Spindles)

http://www.buy.com/prod/tdk-dvd-r-16x-4-7gb-150-discs-3-50pk-spindles/213348832.html

Have never used these myself so no idea about the quality or MID.[/QUOTE]

Not a bad deal. Do anyone know if these are good discs

Thanks
Mr. Bill :cool:


#3

Not sure, mediocre at best, probably CMCMAG D01
http://www.buy.com/prod/tdk-dvd-r-16x-4-7gb-150-discs-3-50pk-spindles/213348832.html


#4

I second jamescooley1. TDK’s DVD-/+ R department tend to be crap, low quality media, with at best medorce MID codes.


#5

It all depends on your use, if you just want plain media, they’ll probably be ok… but if you want good to excellent quality, go with Verbatim blue/magenta label +rs, or Taiyo Yuden’s 8x (recorded @ 8x) for archival quality that will actually LAST beyond 2 years before degrading in a way you can pick up on quality scans (PIE, PIF). :iagree:


#6

AVOID TDK at all costs. TDK are well known for outsourcing their discs to different manufacturers at the lowest cost, so what you could get may be different the next time you wanted to buy some. Not really worth gambling your stuff unless your pretty certain you know who made them :disagree:

Why not stick to Maxell, since I think they can be got for a similar price? They always use the RitekF1 for DVD-R, and RitekF16 for DVD+R :slight_smile:


#7

[QUOTE=Chad_Bronson;2616592]AVOID TDK at all costs. TDK are well known for outsourcing their discs to different manufacturers at the lowest cost, so what you could get may be different the next time you wanted to buy some. Not really worth gambling your stuff unless your pretty certain you know who made them :disagree:

Why not stick to Maxell, since I think they can be got for a similar price? They always use the RitekF1 for DVD-R, and RitekF16 for DVD+R :)[/QUOTE]

Almost every time I see an ultra-low price around the holidays there are horror stories attached to them about the product being junk. :rolleyes:
A BRAND name even if it’s TDK can not risk having their product labeled as LANDFILL quality and deal with QC RMA issues from thousands of customers who will go through the hardship (and cost) of shipping back product… who EXPECT better product and free shipping for the return trip.

** The only areas I would agree with is if you plan to use these disks for DVD-VIDEO (stand-alone players) & LONG TERM IMPORTANT data archival… then in all cases buck up & buy better media!


#8

These disks suck! I bought 300 of them on sale for $3.00 a spindle of 50 with free shipping. That was about 18 months ago and I still have about 150 of them. I burned them at 8x in the 1640 and they are playable. At 12x in the Optiarc 7200 they are also playable. Don’t scan them or you will be suprised that they play at all. The media code on my disks was CMC MAG-M01-00.
budzos


#9

[QUOTE=tmc8080;2616617]Almost every time I see an ultra-low price around the holidays there are horror stories attached to them about the product being junk. :rolleyes: [/QUOTE]

Maybe because those ultra-low priced discs are crap. Not always of course; But most are.

[QUOTE=tmc8080;2616617] A BRAND name even if it’s TDK can not risk having their product labeled as LANDFILL quality and deal with QC RMA issues from thousands of customers who will go through the hardship (and cost) of shipping back product… who EXPECT better product and free shipping for the return trip.

** The only areas I would agree with is if you plan to use these disks for DVD-VIDEO (stand-alone players) & LONG TERM IMPORTANT data archival… then in all cases buck up & buy better media![/QUOTE]

I have to disagree with you there, tmc. Companies like TDK, Memorex etc constantly chop and change who manufacturers their disc, usually for the lowest available price. So long as TDK get something out of it, they don’t care who does.

If companies like TDK et al really do care about the consumers, they would demand the cream of the crop from their manufacturers and not take on the lowest grade possible under that MID code. I haven’t got a problem with outsourcing since the big players, MBI, CMC, Ritek… All work well the burners I have - But they should at least expect the best.

It’s pretty well known that people who are savvy on MID codes tend to hostile using CMC media for being low quality. Why do Memorex (especially so), for example, keep continuing to sell despite being shamed as one of the worst “branded” optical disc sellers out there?

People will learn soon enough that low quality discs will hurt the brand by many annoyed buyers who paid a lot of money (frequent buyers from the shelf) who simply will not use the brand in the future.

BTW - If I wanted medoirce discs, make sense to pay for it under a brand name like ASDA or Tesco than pay a proper brand price for it! :wink:


#10

[QUOTE=tmc8080;2616617]
A BRAND name even if it’s TDK can not risk having their product labeled as LANDFILL quality and deal with QC RMA issues from thousands of customers who will go through the hardship (and cost) of shipping back product… who EXPECT better product and free shipping for the return trip. [/QUOTE]

The sad reality is that incredibly few will take the time and expense to return poor quality media. Just take a look at the reviews of any of the retail brand media at a seller like newegg or SMS. You will find plenty of people who are not thrilled with getting 5 coasters out of 50, but are willing to consider it a good deal for the price. Folks buying the likes of TDK or Memorex media have simply grown accustomed to ever lower expectations and won’t know better unless they get lucky and stumble across club.myce.com(even that doesn’t always work :wink: ). Profit margins for brands selling at the retail/brick and mortar level are extremely slim(too many mark-ups along the way), and brands like TDK are driven by market pressure to seek ever-cheaper sources for their media to remain competitive.

[QUOTE=tmc8080;2616617]
** The only areas I would agree with is if you plan to use these disks for DVD-VIDEO (stand-alone players) & LONG TERM IMPORTANT data archival… then in all cases buck up & buy better media![/QUOTE]

Who exactly are you recommending these to? If you rule out people using them for video and for backing up data(I do believe anyone’s data would be considered important to THEM), who is it you would in good conscience sell these to?


#11

[QUOTE=deanwitty;2616866]The sad reality is that incredibly few will take the time and expense to return poor quality media. Just take a look at the reviews of any of the retail brand media at a seller like newegg or SMS. You will find plenty of people who are not thrilled with getting 5 coasters out of 50, but are willing to consider it a good deal for the price. Folks buying the likes of TDK or Memorex media have simply grown accustomed to ever lower expectations and won’t know better unless they get lucky and stumble across club.myce.com(even that doesn’t always work :wink: ). Profit margins for brands selling at the retail/brick and mortar level are extremely slim(too many mark-ups along the way), and brands like TDK are driven by market pressure to seek ever-cheaper sources for their media to remain competitive. [/QUOTE]

Sadly, deanwitty is right on the money there. Most people will not take up the time to look at MID codes. When I started burning seriously last year, my first cake was Bulkpaq Orange 16x, a 50 pack I got for £5. Having a horrendous burning problem on my burners, I began looking into MID codes, Bulkpaq, burning speeds, before eventually joining Club MyCE to ask for, and also give, support :slight_smile:

The additional problem with Memorex et al is that serious retailers will not take them back for being crap discs since so many factors can influence a bad burn. PC multi-tasking, poor writing stratergy, poor writing speed, burner doesn’t like them or just flat out crap discs.

In ordinary circumstances a disc is a disc and will keep for a while if treated okay. But there are so many offcuts and bad batches that it makes it hard to tell which is which.

[B]deanwitty[/B] just a question I wanted to ask you. I know that my local supermarkets do their own line of DVD+R, so I bought some as an emergency buy and they come up as a CMC M01, also under TDK, Memorex, etc.

My question is, if these brands all have the same MID code and same performances, would there be any point getting branded CMC M01 like TDK / Memorex, when I can get the same MID from my supermarket value? Please ask me to clarify if you don’t follow that :slight_smile:

Thanks!


#12

You bring up a very good point in that most sellers will not accept returned discs for a refund, and those that will take returns are offering to swap the junk you got with the same junk off their shelves. Why bother:rolleyes:?

I’ve been fortunate enough to have some very revealing discussions about blank media manufacturing with manufacturers reps and wholesalers over the years. To answer your question, let me give you a little insight into how it works. Discs are manufactured using a stamper. Said stamper slowly wears out as it is used for manufacturing. Basically, discs 1-1000 are A grade, discs 1000-5,000 are B grade, and depending on the standards(or financial realities) of that factory, 5,000-10,000 are C grade, and this continues as far as that factory chooses before replacing it. I don’t know the actual numbers for any given factory(that I can disclose;)), but you get the idea.

I chuckle when I read the posts of “media gurus” elsewhere who scoff at the notion of a good batch of media or a bad batch of media ;). You better believe that the spindle containing discs 1-50 off that stamper will burn profoundly better than the spindle containing discs 10,000-10,050.

This is why the same MID discs under different brands can truly be very different in quality. Brand 1 buys only A and B grade discs from a manufacturer. Brand 2 usually buys grade B but currently is willing to buy grade B and C discs because their media accessories division’s sales were down last quarter and they need to make a little more profit from their media division for the sake of their shareholders. Even more factors are involved, of course.

Is it possible that the cheaper discs you are talking about are as good as big-name branded ones? Yes. Can I tell you without trying them myself? No :o:). Depending on the grade, too many MID’s from manufacturers like CMC/Ritek/MBI can and do range from landfill to pretty decent. I truly wish that I could give you the nod and help you save some coin, but I’m afraid you will need to start dating the supermarket media buyer’s daughter and learn what grade they are buying yourself :bigsmile:.

The price of the discs is very often, but not always, an indication of the grade you are buying.


#13

[QUOTE=deanwitty;2616891]You bring up a very good point in that most sellers will not accept returned discs for a refund, and those that will take returns are offering to swap the junk you got with the same junk off their shelves. Why bother:rolleyes:?

I’ve been fortunate enough to have some very revealing discussions about blank media manufacturing with manufacturers reps and wholesalers over the years. To answer your question, let me give you a little insight into how it works. Discs are manufactured using a stamper. Said stamper slowly wears out as it is used for manufacturing. Basically, discs 1-1000 are A grade, discs 1000-5,000 are B grade, and depending on the standards(or financial realities) of that factory, 5,000-10,000 are C grade, and this continues as far as that factory chooses before replacing it. I don’t know the actual numbers for any given factory(that I can disclose;)), but you get the idea.

I chuckle when I read the posts of “media gurus” elsewhere who scoff at the notion of a good batch of media or a bad batch of media ;). You better believe that the spindle containing discs 1-50 off that stamper will burn profoundly better than the spindle containing discs 10,000-10,050.

This is why the same MID discs under different brands can truly be very different in quality. Brand 1 buys only A and B grade discs from a manufacturer. Brand 2 usually buys grade B but currently is willing to buy grade B and C discs because their media accessories division’s sales were down last quarter and they need to make a little more profit from their media division for the sake of their shareholders. Even more factors are involved, of course.

Is it possible that the cheaper discs you are talking about are as good as big-name branded ones? Yes. Can I tell you without trying them myself? No :o:). Depending on the grade, too many MID’s from manufacturers like CMC/Ritek/MBI can and do range from landfill to pretty decent. I truly wish that I could give you the nod and help you save some coin, but I’m afraid you will need to start dating the supermarket media buyer’s daughter and learn what grade they are buying yourself :bigsmile:.

The price of the discs is very often, but not always, an indication of the grade you are buying.[/QUOTE]

Can I just say out of all the members here on Club MyCE, you’ve been one of the most helpful :bow:

Your tongue in cheek references never fail to amuse! :bigsmile: I’m a little confused about the term “stampers” - I am aware of stampers used to, er, stamp the MID code onto a disc, but what exactly does a “stamper” do? :confused:

I never really got the whole A / B / Grade notion; I always thought that the MID code was exactly the same regardless of what grade it was? The only reason why I can think supermarket line CDs and DVDs, despite having the same MID code as branded ones like TDK and Memorex, is how the ones supermarkets pick up is offcuts which CMC, Ritek etc couldn’t sell so they discount their batches in order to flog off as soon as possible, rather like what TuffDisc did by getting botched discs and relabeling them and selling them under their own brand.

Surely the notion of grading for discs is just hyperbole? I mean RiDisc may pride itself in being Grade A CD-R; but why on earth would TuffDisc (for example) stick Grade C on their discs? A bit extreme I know.

The way I see it dean is near enough every MID code is capable of producing good results, and the good results produced by CMC, Ritek, MBI, and even the higher lines like Verbatim and TY reinforce this. The only boycott I can think of why for the former disc producers is the low quality / landfill quality batches people just by accident have got.

Buying offcut brands don’t help this either. Intenso and Maxell got the cream of the crop for CMC, whilst Bulkpaq and supermarket brands probably got the leg ends. Please do correct me anyone if I’m wrong :slight_smile:


#14

Thank you for your very kind words :o :flower:

> I’m a little confused about the term “stampers” - I am aware of stampers used to, er, stamp the MID code onto a disc, but what exactly does a “stamper” do? :confused:

You’re going to get me in trouble here Chad. I’ve already shared more than the manufacturers would care to see. There is good reason they avoid letting this become common knowledge(at least for them). I thought it safe to give it a passing mention in a “bargain” thread to try to help you get a better grasp of what you’re dealing with. Here is a quote from a professional media testing/manufacturing company:

With molded discs that have not been handled, the most common cause of defects is a defective master or stamper. This is true because any defect on the stamper will be faithfully reproduced on every disc. This applies to recordable discs too, as a stamper is used to mold the pre-groove into the blank disc. A small defect on the stamper used to make recordable media will create a spot where proper recording cannot take place. Stamper defects can be so small or subtle that they are not visible to the naked eye, so you can’t always tell by looking at the disc.

The grooves created by that stamper contain more and more defects as it wears out. This is literally the biggest factor in the variation you see in burn quality with a single MID.

>I never really got the whole A / B / Grade notion; I always thought that the MID code was exactly the same regardless of what grade it was? The only reason why I can think supermarket line CDs and DVDs, despite having the same MID code as branded ones like TDK and Memorex, is how the ones supermarkets pick up is offcuts which CMC, Ritek etc couldn’t sell so they discount their batches in order to flog off as soon as possible, rather like what TuffDisc did by getting botched discs and relabeling them and selling them under their own brand.

Hopefully you are beginning to understand? Discs of the same MID are actually good/mediocre/bad based on what point in the stamper run they are from. Other points in the manufacturing process can certainly experience a temporary breakdown inducing defective discs, a bad batch of chemical can leave a production run with poor bonding, but the quality variation caused by the stamper is constant and unavoidable. TDK and other brands are very much aware of this and can specify what grade they wish to receive. Of course the factory prices their discs based on their grade. Some manufacturers replace/refurbish that stamper before it starts producing defective coaster-prone media. Others push it too far in pursuit of more profit or the result of inadequate quality control checks.

>Surely the notion of grading for discs is just hyperbole?

No. Very real.

>The way I see it dean is near enough every MID code is capable of producing good results, and the good results produced by CMC, Ritek, MBI, and even the higher lines like Verbatim and TY reinforce this. The only boycott I can think of why for the former disc producers is the low quality / landfill quality batches people just by accident have got.

Its no accident. Lower grade discs are bought very intentionally by resellers to make more profit.

>Buying offcut brands don’t help this either. Intenso and Maxell got the cream of the crop for CMC, whilst Bulkpaq and supermarket brands probably got the leg ends. Please do correct me anyone if I’m wrong :slight_smile:

You’re looking as I am for the realities behind the marketing fluff and nonsense. I’ve just been at it a little longer and knocked on a few more doors in my search ;). It can get a bit touchy for me as I try to respect friends and information given to me in confidence and balance that against wishing to help others make good decisions with more information :(.

PS- You did NOT hear any of this from me. Seriously.


#15

[QUOTE=deanwitty;2616910]Thank you for your very kind words :o :flower:

> I’m a little confused about the term “stampers” - I am aware of stampers used to, er, stamp the MID code onto a disc, but what exactly does a “stamper” do? :confused:

You’re going to get me in trouble here Chad. I’ve already shared more than the manufacturers would care to see. There is good reason they avoid letting this become common knowledge(at least for them). I thought it safe to give it a passing mention in a “bargain” thread to try to help you get a better grasp of what you’re dealing with. Here is a quote from a professional media testing/manufacturing company:

With molded discs that have not been handled, the most common cause of defects is a defective master or stamper. This is true because any defect on the stamper will be faithfully reproduced on every disc. This applies to recordable discs too, as a stamper is used to mold the pre-groove into the blank disc. A small defect on the stamper used to make recordable media will create a spot where proper recording cannot take place. Stamper defects can be so small or subtle that they are not visible to the naked eye, so you can’t always tell by looking at the disc.

The grooves created by that stamper contain more and more defects as it wears out. This is literally the biggest factor in the variation you see in burn quality with a single MID.

>I never really got the whole A / B / Grade notion; I always thought that the MID code was exactly the same regardless of what grade it was? The only reason why I can think supermarket line CDs and DVDs, despite having the same MID code as branded ones like TDK and Memorex, is how the ones supermarkets pick up is offcuts which CMC, Ritek etc couldn’t sell so they discount their batches in order to flog off as soon as possible, rather like what TuffDisc did by getting botched discs and relabeling them and selling them under their own brand.

Hopefully you are beginning to understand? Discs of the same MID are actually good/mediocre/bad based on what point in the stamper run they are from. Other points in the manufacturing process can certainly experience a temporary breakdown inducing defective discs, a bad batch of chemical can leave a production run with poor bonding, but the quality variation caused by the stamper is constant and unavoidable. TDK and other brands are very much aware of this and can specify what grade they wish to receive. Of course the factory prices their discs based on their grade. Some manufacturers replace/refurbish that stamper before it starts producing defective coaster-prone media. Others push it too far in pursuit of more profit or the result of inadequate quality control checks.

>Surely the notion of grading for discs is just hyperbole?

No. Very real.

>The way I see it dean is near enough every MID code is capable of producing good results, and the good results produced by CMC, Ritek, MBI, and even the higher lines like Verbatim and TY reinforce this. The only boycott I can think of why for the former disc producers is the low quality / landfill quality batches people just by accident have got.

Its no accident. Lower grade discs are bought very intentionally by resellers to make more profit.

>Buying offcut brands don’t help this either. Intenso and Maxell got the cream of the crop for CMC, whilst Bulkpaq and supermarket brands probably got the leg ends. Please do correct me anyone if I’m wrong :slight_smile:

You’re looking as I am for the realities behind the marketing fluff and nonsense. I’ve just been at it a little longer and knocked on a few more doors in my search ;). It can get a bit touchy for me as I try to respect friends and information given to me in confidence and balance that against wishing to help others make good decisions with more information :(.

PS- You did NOT hear any of this from me. Seriously.[/QUOTE]

No problem :wink: First off the bat I apologise for my lateness of my email, I’ve not been sleeping well for the past few nights. I respect your decision of concealing indenties of people, companies etc, and to be honest with you Dean I expected you to do that anyway :iagree:

I fail to understand how this might be, as you say, top secret technology but that might be because I’m being dimwittyed (see what I did there? :bigsmile ) since I would have thought this would be a little more widespread on MyCE - It’s well know about grading discs, and companies manufacturing techniques, etc - I think merely your just reinforcing your knowledge :slight_smile:

So, a master is effectively the “way” of making a disc using a certain dye formula - So for example the master would be the mid code itself, like CMC MAG AM3, whereas the discs themselves are merely “clones” of this master, from the machine (if appropriate?) how to MAKE the disc by spreading the dye in a certain way and bonding the layers of a disc together? Possibly as well as putting a brand name, if apt, onto a disc?

Sorry for the wayward questions and if you feel uncomfortable at all answering any of these questions, let me know ASAP and I’ll suppress it. Or, you can pop me an email :slight_smile:

The only realistic way for me to become a little more knowledgeable about MID codes is to get out there and try different MID codes. Truth be told, and ignorance on my part - I have little interest in scans for the discs - So long as it’s readable on ImgBurn, it will do me :slight_smile:

The only time I am cautious about MID codes is if they are going in my standalone recorder - Which for my CMC MAG M01, I am VERY wary about :eek:

Take care, Chad.


#16

[QUOTE=deanwitty;2616891]I’ve been fortunate enough to have some very revealing discussions about blank media manufacturing with manufacturers reps and wholesalers over the years. To answer your question, let me give you a little insight into how it works. Discs are manufactured using a stamper. Said stamper slowly wears out as it is used for manufacturing. Basically, discs 1-1000 are A grade, discs 1000-5,000 are B grade, and depending on the standards(or financial realities) of that factory, 5,000-10,000 are C grade, and this continues as far as that factory chooses before replacing it. I don’t know the actual numbers for any given factory(that I can disclose;)), but you get the idea.[/QUOTE]

You are basically right, but regarding the grading system, there are more factors (and some of them are much more important) then the stamper worn-out level. The stamper cost counts for about 1% of the DVDR medium production costs.

A substantial part of produced media always has to be down graded because it doesn’t meet tolerances (uneven dye thickness, dye comets, dots and microscopic dirt in dye/reflective layer, cosmetic defects, etc.). This is done partially automatically (by an inline scanner in a manufacturing line) and partially manually by a visual control from line operators. The media, that 100% pass the set criteria, are sold as the “A grade media”, the rest is sold as “B” or “C” grade media for lower prices (of course, not counting unusable media with severe defects - those are recycled or thrown away).
More importantly - these days, the most of “B-grade” media are intentionally produced to be of lower quality and therefore cheaper than “A-grade” media. They may be produced on older manufacturing lines or on lines with faster manufacturing cycles, from worse quality or recycled polycarbonate, from cheaper dye, with a slightly thinner dye/reflective layer, etc.
Compare the 4-5 years old and “new” DVDR media. The “new” one are slightly thinner, their recording side is much lighter and the feel extremely cheap in comparison (bubbles in the bonding glue, rough edges, etc.).


#17

[QUOTE=Chad_Bronson;2616928]So, a master is effectively the “way” of making a disc using a certain dye formula - So for example the master would be the mid code itself, like CMC MAG AM3, whereas the discs themselves are merely “clones” of this master, from the machine (if appropriate?) how to MAKE the disc by spreading the dye in a certain way and bonding the layers of a disc together? Possibly as well as putting a brand name, if apt, onto a disc?
[/QUOTE]

Chad, you may find these videos very informative and interesting:



#18

Thanks Pepst :flower:

Wonderful job of rounding out the realities of disc grades. I thought I would try to explain one of the simplest factors that results in differing disc qualities from even the best of manufacturers to help make our member aware that there are in fact different disc quality grades beyond “offcuts” and such. You’ve certainly bumped it up a few notches and I think made it very clear why one might wish to avoid purchasing media from manufacturers who also play fast and loose with material qualities and manufacturing lines ;). Chad brings up an interesting point. These facts are not widely discussed here or elsewhere. Perhaps those of us with a penchant for poking our noses into the dirty side of media manufacturing need to make a little more noise about it :confused::wink:

I’ve said it before, and I’ll say it again, You Da Man! :bigsmile:


#19

[QUOTE=pepst;2616939]You are basically right, but regarding the grading system, there are more factors (and some of them are much more important) then the stamper worn-out level. The stamper cost counts for about 1% of the DVDR medium production costs.

A substantial part of produced media always has to be down graded because it doesn’t meet tolerances (uneven dye thickness, dye comets, dots and microscopic dirt in dye/reflective layer, cosmetic defects, etc.). This is done partially automatically (by an inline scanner in a manufacturing line) and partially manually by a visual control from line operators. The media, that 100% pass the set criteria, are sold as the “A grade media”, the rest is sold as “B” or “C” grade media for lower prices (of course, not counting unusable media with severe defects - those are recycled or thrown away).
More importantly - these days, the most of “B-grade” media are intentionally produced to be of lower quality and therefore cheaper than “A-grade” media. They may be produced on older manufacturing lines or on lines with faster manufacturing cycles, from worse quality or recycled polycarbonate, from cheaper dye, with a slightly thinner dye/reflective layer, etc.
Compare the 4-5 years old and “new” DVDR media. The “new” one are slightly thinner, their recording side is much lighter and the feel extremely cheap in comparison (bubbles in the bonding glue, rough edges, etc.).[/QUOTE]

AH! So the stamper is the machine that literally stamps the information onto a disc? Please enlighten further, all of this is going over my head :sad: :eek:

Although I know exactly what you mean about being “imperfect” discs, ranging from the blue dots to streaks in the dye itself. I have observed, however, this mainly occurs after I try to burn a disc that has been lightly scratched, rather than being out of the blue scratched - They were ALWAYS in the Ritek F1 / Ritek F16 MID codes however, never CMC or UmeDisc.

The poor bonding I never really considered as a problem (almost always on the leg ends of DVD-Rs and CD-Rs as much as how the actual disc itself burns. Most of my burns, through CMC MAG AM3 RitekF1 Ritek F16 and now CMC MAG M01 have always been unsuccessful at verifying back on ImgBurn when recorded on my standalone.

However, most of them verified if they were actually burned on my computer, so I think the recording protection on my standalone is wrecking havoc at trying to copy the discs, since those recorded on my standalone all play back on different burners / players successfully.

Many thanks again Pepst for the research. I have been enlightened, and it’s genuinely a pleasure to talk to someone who takes a look at different manufacturers without recommended TY or Verbitim out of blind ignorance and propaganda. Not to upset the many members of Club MyCE of course, but it seems unfair to just blindly recommend one brand over another.

Quite astonishing really considering that so much can go wrong in making optical media, who despite spending millions of dollars and hours of man/womanpower on equipment to produce such things we can get DVD-Rs for less than 10p each :eek:


#20

In addition, I have also been enlightened how a disc is made! Essentially it is just a dye sandwiched between two layers of plastic! Well, how I see it anyway! :bigsmile:

P.S. How DID we hijack the original posters post? :rollseyes: :bigsmile: