12TB HDDs from Seagate to be released within 2 months

vbimport

#1

We’ve just posted the following news: 12TB HDDs from Seagate to be released within 2 months[newsimage]http://www.myce.com/wp-content/images_posts/2016/07/517ZBdCsJsL-95x75.jpg[/newsimage]

Seagate plans to release a batch of 12TB HDDs to ‘pilot customers’ this quarter. The information comes from Seagate’s CEO that mentioned the 12TB disks during an earnings call. The drive will likely be the successor of Seagate’s 10TB drive that’s currently available.

            Read the full article here: [http://www.myce.com/news/12tb-hdds-seagate-released-within-2-months-80135/](http://www.myce.com/news/12tb-hdds-seagate-released-within-2-months-80135/)

            Please note that the reactions from the complete site will be synched below.

#2

Awesome. I’m rocking an ssd, a 6tb and a few 4tb’s.  12tb’s. That insane! :slight_smile:


#3

I still remember my first harddisk, 20MB (that’s right, megabytes) thinking I was never going to run out of space, and now we’re closing in on the first 20TB drive :bigsmile:


#4

[QUOTE=Zod;2778995]Awesome. I’m rocking an ssd, a 6tb and a few 4tb’s. 12tb’s. That insane! :)[/QUOTE]
I sell my left **&^ for that…


#5

Buy at least two drives. One to use and one for backup. I would be terrified to have that much storage at risk without multiple backups.


#6

I visited a friend at Stanford University, they actually had Petabyte hard drives that they were doing research on. I do not think they are available to the pubic though.


#7

To have that much information riding on one set of bearings, one circuit board, one set of read/write heads etc. would have me on pins and needles. Especially since it is made by Seagate. They haven’t instilled much confidence in me over the years as I have had numerous drives of theirs fail me without the slightest warning.


#8

[QUOTE=UTR;2779013]To have that much information riding on one set of bearings, one circuit board, one set of read/write heads etc. would have me on pins and needles. Especially since it is made by Seagate. They haven’t instilled much confidence in me over the years as I have had numerous drives of theirs fail me without the slightest warning.[/QUOTE]
That is a understatement but they way I see it is if the drive is mainly a storage drive running at 5400rpm then it will be ok for that purpose since failure will be only if the hardware goes from lifespan not constant wear and tear. I think that will be where 8tb and higher SSD will be mostly used in storage and archival means first. That is what I plan to use a one or more 12tb SSD for. Assuming I can afford one.


#9

[QUOTE=coolcolors;2779015]That is a understatement but they way I see it is if the drive is mainly a storage drive running at 5400rpm then it will be ok for that purpose since failure will be only if the hardware goes from lifespan not constant wear and tear. I think that will be where 8tb and higher SSD will be mostly used in storage and archival means first. That is what I plan to use a one or more 12tb SSD for. Assuming I can afford one.[/QUOTE]

The Seagate drives I have had fail happened well before their lifespan was up or even close to being up. Most failed within 3-6 months after purchase. About 2-3 years ago I stopped using this brand completely and haven’t had a hard drive die since then. One thing I can thank Seagate for is they made me far more diligent about backing up my files and data over multiple drives. Now I even backup to the “Cloud” in case the house burns down.

I agree though with the 5,400 rpm drives being inherently more reliable than faster drives. Speed typically means more friction and power usage which usually means more heat and heat kills electronics.


#10

[QUOTE=alan1476;2779009]I visited a friend at Stanford University, they actually had Petabyte hard drives that they were doing research on. I do not think they are available to the pubic though.[/QUOTE]

Now that would cover my needs for the foreseeable future :bigsmile:


#11

[QUOTE=Xercus;2778996]I still remember my first harddisk, 20MB (that’s right, megabytes) thinking I was never going to run out of space, and now we’re closing in on the first 20TB drive :bigsmile:[/QUOTE]Let me guess, it was attached to an IBM PC/XT. Am I Right?


#12

[QUOTE=TSJnachos117;2779041]Let me guess, it was attached to an IBM PC/XT. Am I Right?[/QUOTE] Almost correct, but I was pretty much a Commodore Amiga-holic back then and so it was an A590 SCSI harddisk.

My first PC harddisk bought just after that I think was a whopping 40 or 60 MB, but I do not recall the spec of the computer’s hardware anymore - Now that I WAS sure I would never be able to fill up :bigsmile:


#13

[QUOTE=Xercus;2779044]Almost correct, but I was pretty much a Commodore Amiga-holic back then and so it was an A590 SCSI harddisk.[/QUOTE]By the time I started getting into computers, Commodore had already ceased to exist. I’ll bet I would have been an Amiga-holic too if I were around in 1985. How many other graphical multi-tasking computers were there at the time that could could show 4096 colors? I can’t think of a single one.[QUOTE=Xercus;2779044]My first PC harddisk bought just after that I think was a whopping 40 or 60 MB, but I do not recall the spec of the computer’s hardware anymore - Now that I WAS sure I would never be able to fill up :bigsmile:[/QUOTE]That’s exactly how I felt about my first 40 GB harddisk (this was the first time I had ever upgraded a harddisk, other than the time my PC died, forcing me to replace it). There was no way I was ever going to fill that up… until I did.:cool:


#14

[QUOTE=TSJnachos117;2779052]By the time I started getting into computers, Commodore had already ceased to exist. I’ll bet I would have been an Amiga-holic too if I were around in 1985. How many other graphical multi-tasking computers were there at the time that could could show 4096 colors? I can’t think of a single one.That’s exactly how I felt about my first 40 GB harddisk (this was the first time I had ever upgraded a harddisk, other than the time my PC died, forcing me to replace it). There was no way I was ever going to fill that up… until I did.:cool:[/QUOTE]
I learned the true meaning of computing around Amiga - first to have sound and audio that was a god send also the Commodore 64 had sound compared to the Atari and the likes in those days didn’t have good audio. That is what most computer users forget before we had Sound card Amiga and Commodore 64 already had built in sound that you could play the game and enjoy the audio.


#15

I think I got some of my first hdd’s around 60 to 120mb days… around the time it was becoming affordable to the masses and the masses were still “middle class”.
With 12tb drives, that should now make 4tb the entry level. Still, one wonders how high capacity hdd’s will go before they’re replaced altogether with ssd drives. For that to happen the pricing would need to come WAY DOWN, dare I say BELOW where current HDD prices are.


#16

Seen to many bad Seagate drives do not buy them


#17

[QUOTE=samlar;2779413]Seen to many bad Seagate drives do not buy them[/QUOTE]
Using 2 8tb seagate right now for data and file storage only and so far they are working good. I think the problem comes when people use for Bootdrive or Raid something the drive isn’t made for or has the drive speed for. Now if this was a SSD 12tb that be a different story.


#18

I’m wondering is it practical to use these LARGE HDD’s as a primary PC system OS drive?
Even though HDD mfg’s claim this helium scheme is practical and safe, it reeks of potential catastrophic failure.
Also, the prices for these drives are becoming insane. $500+ for a hdd?!? WTF are they thinking??


#19

[QUOTE=tmc8080;2779838]I’m wondering is it practical to use these LARGE HDD’s as a primary PC system OS drive?
Even though HDD mfg’s claim this helium scheme is practical and safe, it reeks of potential catastrophic failure.
Also, the prices for these drives are becoming insane. $500+ for a hdd?!? WTF are they thinking??[/QUOTE]

Personally I have, like coolcolors mentions above as his setup too, two 8TB drives as data drives. The system drives are SSDs of 320 and 480GB for most computers and even the one still running HD still runs a 500GB drive. This is mostly to not have backup schedules taking forever (we do tend to fill them up over time).
Because of it and even though the Seagate drives has a bumpy past as far as reliability goes, a 12TB system drive of any make is not something I would use personally.

As for price… Whatever the market is willing to pay I guess :flower:


#20

Will it actually be reliable? Seagate always seems to experience the highest failure rates while WD and HGST have the lowest. I’d like an 8TB WD Red, but I can’t afford to spend ~$750-800 for two of them (one as a redundant backup).

I’ve been pretty lucky so far with Seagate drives. I have had four of their external hard drives - a 1TB USB 3.0 desktop model, 1TB USB 2.0 portable, 250GB USB 2.0 portable and a 3TB Barracuda and so far the only one that has failed is the 250GB. I was using it for school running all kinds of VMs off of it, got ~4 yrs of life out of it.

I’ve also got a WD 2TB USB 3.0 portable, WD 3TB USB 3.0 portable, WD Red 3TB, 750GB HGST and a couple of Samsung 250GB SSDs. I will probably just stick to WD or HGST in the future as those brands seem to have the best reliability.