‘123456’ remains most popular password, ‘password’ and ‘qwerty’ also in top 5

vbimport

#1

We’ve just posted the following news: ‘123456’ remains most popular password, ‘password’ and ‘qwerty’ also in top 5[newsimage]http://static.myce.com//images_posts/2015/12/CXdYv51WkAI-Emz-95x75.jpg[/newsimage]

The password '123456 remains the most popular on the internet, according to researchers of the German Hasso-Plattner-Institute of the University of Potsdam. The researchers investigated 215 million leaked identities of which 35 million were leaked this year.

            Read the full article here: [http://www.myce.com/news/123456-remains-most-popular-password-password-and-qwerty-also-in-top-5-78263/](http://www.myce.com/news/123456-remains-most-popular-password-password-and-qwerty-also-in-top-5-78263/)

            Please note that the reactions from the complete site will be synched below.

#2

A lot of people try to fool you and pick 6 5 4 3 2 1 , just be more secure LOL:bigsmile::bigsmile::bigsmile::bigsmile::bigsmile:


#3

I regularly come across people using elements of their email address in the password, and people still using reset passwords like london123.


#4

[QUOTE=rexroach;2765839]I regularly come across people using elements of their email address in the password, and people still using reset passwords like london123.[/QUOTE]
A password is only to keep honest people out, a hacker can get into what he pleases if he wants. Passwords no matter how long or stupid are not a protective element.


#5

In never cease to amaze me how little creative people are. Unless I enforce password complexity and password aging, I can use a default password to log on to most accounts two years later.

Then again, we can not enforce too much complexity either, it only serves the purpose of making the network less secure.
Why you may ask, and I’ll answer it for you. I was called to fix a troublesome network for a Norwegian branch of a German company which turned out to be a virus having a party. In each and every office, the password was found on a Post-It note either under the keyboard, at the back of the screen or in plain sight on the desk.

Now that is a non-working security policy for you, and goes to prove what I always say: IT security will only work in conjunction with the users. Try as you might to enforce the strictest and most rigid password security policy on the planet and I can already guarantee you will fail in achieving your goal.

Well back on track, for anyone finding this thread who chuckle because they recognize themselves - let me teach you a trick… called keyboard-tracking. This technique is simple and it is easy to create very advanced passwords using it.
A password like Sr4Dt5Fy6 could be considered advanced and if you look at your keyboard, it follows logic and so it is easier to remember while avoiding the names of kids, pets and so on. Find the most advanced keyboard track that suits you, do not tell anyone and stick to it, shift one step left or right when forced to change.

Good, now you are the user of my dreams :bigsmile:


#6

[QUOTE=alan1476;2765850]A password is only to keep honest people out, a hacker can get into what he pleases if he wants. Passwords no matter how long or stupid are not a protective element.[/QUOTE]

LOL :bigsmile: - You do not need any password to keep honest people out.
While you are correct for the most as a hacker could not be bothered with anything apart from maybe Administrator on the user side and rather hack their way to the built-in system accounts to have better access, I still think a good password could save you a lot of trouble, like another employee impersonating you on the network.


#7

[QUOTE=Xercus;2765851]In never cease to amaze me how little creative people are. Unless I enforce password complexity and password aging, I can use a default password to log on to most accounts two years later.

Then again, we can not enforce too much complexity either, it only serves the purpose of making the network less secure.
Why you may ask, and I’ll answer it for you. I was called to fix a troublesome network for a Norwegian branch of a German company which turned out to be a virus having a party. In each and every office, the password was found on a Post-It note either under the keyboard, at the back of the screen or in plain sight on the desk.

Now that is a non-working security policy for you, and goes to prove what I always say: IT security will only work in conjunction with the users. Try as you might to enforce the strictest and most rigid password security policy on the planet and I can already guarantee you will fail in achieving your goal.

Well back on track, for anyone finding this thread who chuckle because they recognize themselves - let me teach you a trick… called keyboard-tracking. This technique is simple and it is easy to create very advanced passwords using it.
A password like Sr4Dt5Fy6 could be considered advanced and if you look at your keyboard, it follows logic and so it is easier to remember while avoiding the names of kids, pets and so on. Find the most advanced keyboard track that suits you, do not tell anyone and stick to it, shift one step left or right when forced to change.

Good, now you are the user of my dreams :bigsmile:[/QUOTE] I can get into 90% of Routers with just a simple
username - admin
password - admin

                     People just are way too trusting. ;););););)

#8

[QUOTE=alan1476;2765863]I can get into 90% of Routers with just a simple
username - admin
password - admin

                     People just are way too trusting. ;););););)[/QUOTE]

Next thing you know, they start complaining about hackers and security breaches - and tomorrow;
username - admin
password - admin
No wonder when you make it a sunday walk :rolleyes:


#9

[QUOTE=Xercus;2765864]Next thing you know, they start complaining about hackers and security breaches - and tomorrow;
username - admin
password - admin
No wonder when you make it a sunday walk :rolleyes:[/QUOTE]

I can walk around town all day and never use any data, every house is a hotspot. LOL


#10

For internet logins,I use Sticky Password…for my computers @ home,I don’t use any password to login…:disagree:
It’s inconvenient,and I have a better protection against unauthorized access @ home…a German shepherd and a Malinois living in my house…:bigsmile:


#11

I thought “GOD” was the most poplar one? Makes one feel godly lmao… Probably can’t be used anymore because the security got updated so you couldn’t be less 6 characters. Otherwise I can guarantee people still being using the password “GOD”.


#12

[QUOTE=Xercus;2765851]Well back on track, for anyone finding this thread who chuckle because they recognize themselves - let me teach you a trick… called keyboard-tracking. This technique is simple and it is easy to create very advanced passwords using it.
A password like Sr4Dt5Fy6 could be considered advanced and if you look at your keyboard, it follows logic and so it is easier to remember while avoiding the names of kids, pets and so on. Find the most advanced keyboard track that suits you, do not tell anyone and stick to it, shift one step left or right when forced to change.

Good, now you are the user of my dreams :bigsmile:[/QUOTE]That’s good, I would never have thought of that.[QUOTE=Xercus;2765864]Next thing you know, they start complaining about hackers and security breaches - and tomorrow;username - admin
password - admin
No wonder when you make it a sunday walk :rolleyes:[/QUOTE]To be fair, routers have never been, and probably never will be secure. It’s not like manufacturers are responsible enough to provide updates for routers that are older than a year or two. I always recommend you have a software firewall, because your hardware firewall is old and insecure. It would be nice if manufacturers would at lease free/open their source code, so third parties can pick up the slack.


#13

[QUOTE=TSJnachos117;2765958]That’s good, I would never have thought of that. [/QUOTE]
It is all for the purpose of rendering social hacking worthless. Anyone’s red flag is up if I have to ask you your password at work. This takes care of that, and since I added an element of visual instead of pure logic to it it should make attempts of logically figuring out all possible keyboard-tracks harder. For those into music, the above is a waltz

[QUOTE=TSJnachos117;2765958]To be fair, routers have never been, and probably never will be secure. It’s not like manufacturers are responsible enough to provide updates for routers that are older than a year or two. I always recommend you have a software firewall, because your hardware firewall is old and insecure. It would be nice if manufacturers would at lease free/open their source code, so third parties can pick up the slack.[/QUOTE]
I invested in an enterprise firewall to handle my two ISPs, finally being able to better loadbalance WAN instead of just Round-Robin. On a general scale, a new update every three months or so. Still, I treasure the software or as I call it, Application firewall. It is of utter importance even if your firewall is brand new.

I mean, I do try as I may to stop what I can on the outside, but hey, I would like to have a second chance. The firewall log, both hardware and application may mean a world of difference as to the next step :slight_smile:


#14

[QUOTE=coolcolors;2765913]I thought “GOD” was the most poplar one? Makes one feel godly lmao… Probably can’t be used anymore because the security got updated so you couldn’t be less 6 characters. Otherwise I can guarantee people still being using the password “GOD”.[/QUOTE]
Most sites will not allow 3 letter logins just for that silly reason.:disagree:


#15

[QUOTE=TSJnachos117;2765958]…It would be nice if manufacturers would at lease free/open their source code, so third parties can pick up the slack.[/QUOTE]

Sweet! Publish the source code so any script kiddie can hack it. That will keep people from hacking your router. Especially that 99% of us who don’t bother upgrading router firmware…:bigsmile:


#16

Hmmm where can we find a full list with the most common passwords :smiley:


#17

[QUOTE=John_Rambo;2766095]Hmmm where can we find a full list with the most common passwords :D[/QUOTE]

It is not hard to find, let me gøggel that for you. :slight_smile:

I will give you one advice just in case: Do not go down the ‘wannabe’ hacker route. You will probably get caught long before you have the required knowledge to become a real hacker. To give you a little hint, the ‘wannabees’ outnumber the real hackers at least 10000:1 and it is not only down to technology.

For any true hacker, there comes a time to step down, but they will forever be, as it is a way of thinking and solve challenges that over the years become burned into their brain.
Comparable people are some of the seasoned CD-Freaks in here, who live, dream and digest optical technology.
No, they have no interest, they have an obsession, a fundamental belief.

With that said, Alan1472 is absolutely correct, it is possible to walk around town all day and not use any of your subscribed mobile data… All you need to know are the default passwords, if any at all… It is that simple really. :flower:


#18

[QUOTE=Xercus;2766112]It is not hard to find, let me gøggel that for you. :)…
With that said, Alan1472 is absolutely correct, it is possible to walk around town all day and not use any of your subscribed mobile data… All you need to know are the default passwords, if any at all… It is that simple really. :flower:[/QUOTE]

I get my internet from ComCast (Xfinity) and they have it setup that if you rent one of their modems it by default sets up a second SSID that is public and usable by any Xfinity customer or for a ‘nominal’ fee.

PS: I own my modem and router so I’m not one of them.