120 minute blanks

I was doing a little searching on yahoo for blank cds and came across this .

Is there any truth to the existence of these, and if so where could i buy them!?!?!?

I would love to make another compilation cd with lots of music. I haven’t bought any 99 minute discs, but from what ive read, the liteon ltr48125w can burn the full 99 minutes.

Anybody know?:bow: :confused:

Lite-on can do 99 min, don’t know about 120 min??

I know about a high dentisy drives of SONY, perhaps they can do 120 min.

Originally posted by kwkard
[B]from what ive read, the liteon ltr48125w can burn the full 99 minutes.

Anybody know?:bow: :confused: [/B]

Since flashing to the new VS08 firmware my liteon 48125w doesnt seem to want to burn 99min cdrs anymore… Just thought you should know… It should hopefully be worked out in the future firmware, but until then I have an expensive stack of useless giga discs :frowning:

why dont you flash it back to something else?

Anyone who knows a solution is welcome to explain to me what the sector header and the q-subchannel looks like at 100+ minutes!

if i had some 99 minute+ discs id check for you.

What I can promise is that the q-subchannel will be invalid. The question is in which way.
I guess that the next time stamp after 99:59:74 will be either “00 00 00” or “:0 00 00”, if it is written in raw-dao mode…

reminds me of the so called Y2K bug. Why would you say that after 99:59:74 it would go to zeros, is it possible to be 100+:xx.xx?

Originally posted by alexnoe
What I can promise is that the q-subchannel will be invalid. The question is in which way.
I guess that the next time stamp after 99:59:74 will be either “00 00 00” or “:0 00 00”, if it is written in raw-dao mode…

From my webpage in my WWW link in my profile.

Yes, this disc plays fine in all cd players. The computer reads the display fine, audio cd players have a fit over the 100 minute mark.
I can’t remember what the audio player displays, but I’ll check it out and report back.

I don’t have any 99 minute discs left to try a data disc. I used my 10 pack for audio!

I’ll have more in early December.

I thought I read that the 120 minute disc format died before any real bulk manufacturing began. So, I doubt there’s any discs out there to be had. I could be wrong too.

I’d like to see the subchannel file…

Originally posted by alexnoe
I’d like to see the subchannel file…

How do I get that? I’ll be glad to post it for you if you can provide me with a link for required software or walk me through it.

I listened to the disc in the mini van on the way home from work and it was fine, other than where it got scratched by my 19 month old son.

My home audio cd player (Pioneer 6 pack changer from 1992 or so) plays it fine. It reads the track time as 0:47 as total playing time. Unlike my computer, the last song on the disc is fine. The computer cut it off just before the end of the song.

I’ll have to update the web page now. :frowning:

My audio cd player does not have an option for total disc playing time elapsed. Only song time elapsed, song time remaining and total disc time remaining.

Read the CD with CloneCD…it will be something like 35 MB, but can be compressed downto almost nothing.

I’m reading it now with Clone CD.

Do you want me to zip it and e-mail it to you, or do I open it up somehow to examine it?

I see there’s an e-mail link in your profile, but it doesn’t allow me at add the .zip attachment.

*** Update: I’ve e-mailed the subcode to him. ***
Please post your results.

The timecode after 99:59:74 is (fasten your seatbelt) A0:00:00

OK. Now I’ll explain it.

Bumbers as 99 or 59, as you know it, are called “decimal”. 59 means 510+91.

Then you might know hexadezimal numbers, such as 2E or the such: That is 216+E1 (with E=14, per definition), which would be 46, in decimal. To avoid misunderstandings, it’s common to put a “0x” before the number if you speak about hexadecimal numbers, such as 46 = 0x2E.

Then, there is “packed BCD”. This one is easy:
46 decimal is 0x46 in packed-BCD (while the decimal value of 0x46 is 4*16+6 = 70 if it is real hexadecimal). You need 4 bits to store one digit, 1 Byte stores 2 digits then.

Q-Subcodes contain timestamps in packed-BCD format, i.e. a timestamp of 23:50:72 would render as
0x23 0x50 0x72. Since one byte can contain only 2 digits, you can’t write a value of 0x100 for the minutes.
The sub file I received contained then an “0xA0” as minute-value: A is hexadecimal for 10…that means that the “first” digit is “10” then, the second is “0”.

This allows of course timestamps of more than 100 min, but it is a funny mixture of hexadecimal and packed-bcd numbers. Seeking beyond 100min should not work at all…

Are these disk for the sony high dentisy cdr drive???

No idea. These 120min discs have been announced long time ago, but were, as to my knowledge, fortunately never released.

EDIT I’ve asked in the german cd writer newsgroup about this kind of timestamps, and got the following response by Jörg Schilling:

Das ist seit ca. 2 Jahren der letzte Schrei in Schanghei und wird in etwas
namens DSVCD verwendet. Ein ganzer Spielfilm auf einer 120 Minuten CD.
Da geht das dann noch viiiel weiter…

Alle neuen Cyberdrive LW können das mit der SW für den chinesischen
Markt lesen.

In English:

This has been very popular and has been used for 2 years in Shanghei and is used in something called DSVCD. A whole movie on a 120 min CDs. This (this kind of timestamps) is then continued.

All new cyberdrive drives can read this with software (i guess he means firmware) for the chinese market

Seems that 120 min discs are available indeed.

perhaps he provided a link as to where one could but these blanks?